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2 films for "known" list


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These two films are presently listed as unknown status by silent era. For those of you who try to keep an up to date list of "known" films, you can add these. They were offered to me today.

 

1) SCARLET LADY 1928, directed by Alan Crosland. Released by Columbia and starred Lya De Putti and Don Alvarado.

 

2)YELLOW LILY 1928, Directed by Alexander Korda. Released by 1st National and starred Billie Dove and Clive Brook.

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Ed,

 

Don't forget about CAMEO KIRBY. And here are a few more titles of great interest. BUTTERFLY, HER BIG NIGHT, HER SISTER FROM PARIS, THE HOMEMAKER, THE JONESTOWN FLOOD, and TIN GODS. Also anything with Corinne Griffith, or Colleen Moore that I don't already have.

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Jeffrey and Ed,

 

Wow! Now that is a list!

 

TILLIE THE TOILER 1927 is under MGM lock and key. Anybody's guess what their intentions are, proberably nothing.

 

HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT did survive and was shown at a festival in England about 20 yrs ago, whereabouts now is unknown but most likely a private collection.

 

CAMEO KIRBY and THE HOMEMAKER are at UCLA and may be possible in the future. Most of the rare titles I find originated there and somehow leaked out?

 

THE JOHNSTOWN FLOOD is at Eastmans in NY so you may never see it, as you know they lend to festivals and no copying at all. Too bad.

 

I am not sure if copies survived of BUTTERFLY, HER BIG NIGHT and TIN GODS???

 

HER SISTER FROM PARIS 1925 was restored by L.O.C. and you should be able to obtain a copy as they usually will copy their holdings for the public.

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nosound.

 

To update the post a little, HER BIG NIGHT (Universal, 1926) with Laura La Plante survives. I know people who have seen it. Dan Navarro viewed it at a live screening, and claimed that the print was in superb condition. Not needing much restoration at all.

 

Clarence Brown's BUTTERFLY (Universal, 1924), with La Plante, Norman Kerry, and Margaret Livingston, was recently restored by UCLA according to Kevin Brownlow, so was Sidney Franklin's THE HOMEMAKER with Alice Joyce, and Clive Brook.

 

HER SISTER FROM PARIS (First National, 1925) with Constance Talmadge and Ronald Coleman meanwhile, was restored a year or two ago by the Doris group. Along with the Norma Talmadge KIKI. The restored Talmadge titles might make it to DVD from someone, or so I have been told, probably Milestone, or Kino before to long now? So that is good news.

 

Ed managed to find a copy of THE FAIR CO-ED, but the quality was dismal. However, in July there was a screening of a new 35 Millimeter print in L. A. I know of people who have claimed to have seen TIN GODS, and FORBIDDEN HOURS? The later apparently had a live screening in 2002. However, Silent era.com still list's that film as "Status Unknown"?

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Thats great news and leaves a little "hope" for some of these titles.

 

The only Colleen Moore I have seen floating around lately is BROKEN HEARTS OF BROADWAY 1923.

 

I have seen a few Raymond Griffiths out there like THE NIGHT CLUB 1925, OPEN ALL NIGHT 1924 and PATHS TO PARADISE 1925.

 

Seems to be more and more titles coming out of hiding. Time is on our side but unfortunately it also happens to be nitrates worst enemy. We shall see....

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nosound,

 

I have all of those Raymond Griffith's except OPEN ALL NIGHT. These are not great prints by any means. Hopefully, better ones survive someplace? David Shepard said that they did, but wasn't specific.

 

I have BROKEN HEARTS OF BROADWAY too. In-fact, I have a couple different versions. One from Sunrise Silent's the other from Unknown Video. No, that's not the one. It is the correct year though. Some months ago, they had another film of Colleen Moore's from 1923 for sale on Ioffer.com. I just can not recall the title?

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Scottman,

 

Kevin Brownlow said on Silver Screen Oasis back in May, that He believed there were also some rights issues involved with MAN, WOMAN & SIN. But I can't imagine what they could be? Do you have any idea? Brownlow said that it was important that this one be seen though, and the rights cleared.

 

I feel the same way about the Photo-play Productions edition of WINGS.

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It is so ridiculous to have these "rights issues" over films almost 80 years old. Surely all the principal parties involved in these issues are long dead. In the meantime these films which so many of us are anxious to view are collecting mothballs or slowly disintegrating into dust.

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smokey15,

 

I agree wholeheartedly! MAN WOMAN & SIN (MGM, 1927) is over 80 years old. Maybe it's that Jeanne Eagels is in the film, I don't know?

 

TCM can, and of course has run WINGS, but they are subjected to what ever Paramount provides them with for broadcast. Inexplicably That hasn't been the Photo-play Productions version. What is the use of having a superior version produced for Television and it is never seen?

 

In fairness to TCM, it definitely isn't their fault that the old Laser-disc release is what Paramount saddled them with. I certainly haven't given up in my quest to get the Photo-play Productions version on TCM.

 

TCM Programmer Charles Tabesh freely admitted that He was under the impression all along that the Photo-play edition is what they would be getting from Paramount when they inked the contract in the first place! Since then, He has been attempting to rectify the situation and clear the rights, but has been unsuccessful. Paramount/Viacom is directly to blame for the Kevin Brownlow restoration not being seen!

 

I was told by some guy who seems to know allot about lease-agreements on Nitrateville, that apparently, there never were any American Broadcast rights as part of the arrangement with Paramount for the Brownlow restoration of WINGS? Just British Television. Well, to be blunt BIG DEAL! In 16 years, that should have long since changed! The Photo-play WINGS was produced in 1993!

It all boils down to Paramount not paying Photo-play, and Carl Davis anything for all their hard-work! Gaylord Carter is passed on, and apparently has no "heirs" to speak of? That's why Paramount sticks with his Wurlitzer scored version. They don't have to shell out any additional royalties to anyone.

 

It's recently come to my attention that the Safety-stock transfer used for the 1985 Paramount Laser-disc, was struck clear back in 1965! I am not kidding here! 43 years ago! Yet that is all that TCM is allowed to play of this picture! The Theater Organ score was also recorded sometime in the Mid to late 70's. By stark contrast, The Photo-play version I am told is very sharp, not muddy. It's pristine looking, and has all the original tints re-instated. Plus you have the awesome Carl Davis orchestral score!

 

It seems that the Channel Four Silent's series, and Photo-play commissioned the Davis score for WINGS. Paramount had nothing to do with it. They may own the rights to the film itself, but Brownlow 's company restored, and scored this version not Paramount. They never purchased the rights to the score. Another fella on Nitrateville told me that Paramount already had a score, so why would they want a competing version shown? My answer to that is? Huh? In my estimation, It's not a competing version at all. Just a more recent one.

 

If Paramount won't put out this version of WINGS on DVD, they should at least allow it to be shown on TCM! I mean the old Gaylord Carter scored Paramount Home video version from the 80's has been bootlegged on DVD and DVD-R all over the place for years and years! There is nothing all that rare about it. Conversely, The Photo-play edition is just collecting dust!

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Jeffrey & Ed,

 

These 3 films are being held at UCLA in different formats, including VHS at the study center.

 

HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT, BUTTERFLY, and HER BIG NIGHT. As I understand, they are available for viewing but they will not copy. Oh well !

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> {quote:title=Scottman wrote:}{quote}

> HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT is held up from viewing because of some rights issues, otherwise MGM still has the film. I believe it was supposed to play at a Cinecon here in LA several years ago, but was not shown due to the rights entanglements.

 

 

Paramount bought HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT from MGM not long after its theatrical run, and remade the film as A BREATH OF SCANDAL in 1960. A clip of HGN was included in the 1993 documentary MGM: WHEN THE LION ROARS. One of the closing credits reads: "HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT -- courtesy of Paramount Pictures." The film was shown at Cinecon in 1998.

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I know HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT sits in a UCLA repository. I didn't know it had had any public showing since its original run. This is interesting. Despite the film's extremely bad reputation and its supposed disastrous effect on John Gilbert's career, the film, released September 1929 cost 210,000 and earned 589,000 at the box office (according to Donald Crafton's book "The Talkies"). It's hard to believe there's not a copy of this one around somewhere. I know Kevin Brownlow has seen it (and disliked it) but I think he saw it at a museum.

 

Betty Compson's STREET GIRL, which was the first film released through the new RKO, cost 211,000 and made 806,000 and was considered a smash hit. SYNCOPATION is sometimes mentioned as the first RKO film but was apparently released under the old FBO umbrella.

 

Of course shaming them both was THE LIGHTS OF NEW YORK which cost a paultry 23,000 (!!) and grossed a whopping 1,160,000..... talk about a megahit!

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STREET GIRL is on my list too.... Richard Barrios gives it a glowing review in his book on musicals.... and yes Betty Compson is really playing that violin. She was a concert-level musician as well as a terrific actress.

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I didn't know Betty could play the violin, thanks for sharing. The first time I saw Deanna Durbin in a film (Three Smart Girls) I was convinced that wasn't her singing. Boy did I have egg on my face when I found out later it really was her. I probably would have done the same with Betty and her violin.

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FORBIDDEN HOURS apparently exists, all right. Andre Soares talks of having seen a rare print of it in his book Beyond Paradise: The Life of Ramon Novarro, and offers some brief critical opinion of it. (I'm still confused by that clip I saw once on TV from Novarro's supposedly lost A CERTAIN YOUNG MAN, unless it came from a surviving trailer...?)

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Watched STREET GIRL.... I liked it. The music was good and although the story was a little thin, it was worth watching to see Betty Compson, Jack Oakie, Ned Sparks, and John Harron (Robert's brother).

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ok the Barrios book says SYNCOPATION was the first film released under Radio Pictures (later RKO) but was produced by FBO... STREET GIRL was the first full Radio Pictures film and it grossed over $1M in 1929! The music was by Oscar Levant of all people.....

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Ed, Aaron,

 

According to this quote from "Decotodd" on Nitrateville, it appears a 35 Millimeter print, virtually complete of John Gilbert's TWELVE MILES OUT may have been found? It was screened at some festival just last year. Previously you had noted that only a few reels survived in 9 and a half millimeter. Well, this apparently is no longer the case?

 

*I saw "12 Miles Out" last year in Los Angeles. The print was pretty sharp and complete as far as I know -- it had the first couple of previously missing reels that give the back-story of the Gilbert and Ernest Torrance characters. The Grapevine dupe begins with the break-in at Crawford and her father's house, about 30 minutes into the film.*

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