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Meet Me in St. Louis

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Isnt Judy Garland an absoulute angel in that movie ! especially at the very end she sings *"Have Youself a Merry Little Christmas"*

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So many wonderful Judy moments in the film! And she summed up this gay boy's feelings perfectly in The Boy Next Door! The Trolley Song is probably in my top 3 Garland film moments!

 

Jon

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I think LandLfan was referring to himself as gay, but in real life Tom Drake (the boy next door) was gay, although in the closet.

 

Judy Garland introduces him from the audience on one of the episodes of *The Judy Garland Show*. It's sweet to see them 19 years later.

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Garland is the supreme entertainer of her generation and possibly for all time. She can relate a song to her audience and make them feel what is in her heart. Nowhere in St. Louis is this more clear than in her rendition of Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas - a carol with obvious tear-jerking sadness and poignancy.

 

The film's most exuberant display of joyous passion remains 'The Trolley Song'.

 

The link between Garland and the gay community has always baffled this straight boy because it seems to exclude straight men from the equation who have found something special to revel in, in her recordings. I think Garland is a universal. She cuts across age, race and sexual preference to be a timeless artifact of her time and for all time. We relate to her innocence and/or innocence lost and find something uniquely sympathetic in her vocalizations.

 

You can't adequately quantify Garland's 'style' into words but you know it instinctively with the first few notes of any song that she sings. After that, if you have any soul at all, you are a fan of Judy Garland's for life. It's that simple.

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I watched this wonderful movie last night for the 100th time. I usually concentrate on Judy's performance and more or less ignore the others. But last night, I watched all closely and realized that the character Tootie was quite disturbed!. That whole Halloween episode was disturbing. DId children actually do these things on Halloween? What about trick or treating. Tootie was supposedly 5 yrs old! She lied, played with bonfires, was pactically hysterical the entire film.

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It seems Margeret O'Brien played some pretty creepy children

but "Tootie" really is disturbed , I mean buring her dolls in coffins

and talking about blood spurting out three feet at the dinner table

reminds me of the film where she opened the trap door to let the dancer

break her legs is another example of her creepiness...

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*DId children actually do these things on Halloween?*

 

According to my dad, they did *much, much* worse things in the 30's and 40's on Halloween. I won't repeat them. Author Sally Benson based Tootie on herself. Joan Carroll as Agnes was also a little weird with the classic lines "I'll kill you. I'll stab you to death in your sleep!" and "What did you get me for Christmas? I hope it's a hunting knife!" Creepy or disturbed? Nah, just hilarious.

 

O'Brien's only *truly* creepy role was indeed in *The Unfinished Dance* , really disturbed, but very believable.

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That's the film where her creepiness became full-blown

theres also something disturbing in her attitude toward

Cyd Charise's character that goes a little bit beyond hero worship

to me The Unfinished Dance is a study of a future assasin in the making..

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*...something disturbing in her attitude toward*

*Cyd Charise's character...*

 

What's so disturbing about a 9-year-old girl showing up by herself at the entrance to Charisse's apartment late at night in New York City?

 

I never read the book, but I'd love to see the original *La Mort du cygne* (1938). Supposed to be much darker, with no happy ending. That *is* a hint, tcmprogrammr!

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I just put in a request for La Mort Du Sygne for showing on their foreign film

series... To get back to creepy Margaret - another thing she lived with Danny Thomas

who wasn't even related to her in the film.. yes she did walk about New York at night

and then cried tears of unrequited love when Cyd Charisse ignored her...and I like the two

vicious friends who betrayed her - what a great film !!!!!

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*...she lived with Danny Thomas who wasn't even related to her in the film...*

 

Might not have happened much in the real world, but it seemed to be commonplace in the golden age of Hollywood. She played orphans in eleven movies. :-( No wonder I cry in nearly every one.

 

And please, no more references to "creepy Margaret", just "creepy Meg" or "odd Tootie". I have my reputation to uphold as her staunchest defender around here. :-)

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> {quote:title=RainingViolets101 wrote:}{quote}

> That's the film where her creepiness became full-blown

> theres also something disturbing in her attitude toward

> Cyd Charise's character that goes a little bit beyond hero worship

> to me The Unfinished Dance is a study of a future assasin in the making..

 

True enough. I'm actually surprised they could get away with some of those things back in the 50's, although of course these things wouldn't seem shocking at all in a movie made today.

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What you're all discussing (Margaret O'Brien's Tootie behavior) is precisely one of the reasons this movie is so great.

 

Real life kids LOVE imagining horrible things (like Tootie's "killing" the neighbor, or burying her dead dolls) --- it helps them take control of fear. Now, I love me some Shirley Temple, but would anyone honestly want to spend any real amount of time with a child like that? While she's tapdancing her way down the top of the dinner table, you can find me with Margaret in the garden burying the dead dolls.

 

Not to say that most real kids have choreographed a cake walk with Judy Garland...... ;).

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*What you're all discussing (Margaret O'Brien's Tootie behavior) is precisely one of the reasons this movie is so great.*

 

Exactly! I hated the movie when I was a kid (wasn't a fan of musicals back then), but years later when I watched it, I realized O'Brien stole the show. And I don't think anyone else then or now could have done better.

 

*...Shirley Temple, but would anyone honestly want to spend any real amount of time with a child like that?*

 

No, I always found her movies *much* scarier than Tootie or Meg. Really.

 

*...kids LOVE imagining horrible things ... it helps them take control of fear.*

 

I never thought about it. Growing up in the military, I knew *much* stranger kids than her. :-)

 

Five-year-olds choreographing cakewalks? Absolutely! Suffered through quite a few performances myself.

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> {quote:title=ChipHeartsMovies wrote:}{quote}

> Real life kids LOVE imagining horrible things (like Tootie's "killing" the neighbor, or burying her dead dolls) --- it helps them take control of fear. Now, I love me some Shirley Temple, but would anyone honestly want to spend any real amount of time with a child like that? While she's tapdancing her way down the top of the dinner table, you can find me with Margaret in the garden burying the dead dolls.

>

 

You know, Chip, you're probably right about that. How soon we forget sometimes! ;)

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