Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

"THE BLUE DAHLIA" on TCM 1/10/09


Recommended Posts

  • 2 months later...

Don't forget *The Blue Dahlia* at 10am ET on Saturday, Jan. 10th B-)

 

*The Blue Dahlia* (1946)

A veteran fights to prove he didn't kill his cheating wife. Cast: Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake, William Bendix. Dir: George Marshall. BW-99 mins, TV-PG, CC

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I made a thread about this film in the Mystery forum, asking if anyone had seen it, or anything about it at all. Awesome! I can't wait to watch it, I;m so glad I happened over here, thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Pia wrote:}{quote}

> Wow, I made a thread about this film in the Mystery forum, asking if anyone had seen it, or anything about it at all. Awesome! I can't wait to watch it, I;m so glad I happened over here, thanks!

 

I guess it's kind of a mystery, too. Most of the time I've heard of it referred to as a film noir, so that's the genre that first comes to mind. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Whether THE BLUE DAHLIA qualifies as noir or not, it's a good film. William Bendix is memorable, ranting about "monkey music" and preparing to light a match by shooting at it -- while Ladd is holding it.

 

Doris Dowling is very effective as the wife -- she was also the bar girl, Gloria, in THE LOST WEEKEND.

 

Veronica Lake is, well, Veronica Lake, in her short-lived prime.

 

And when someone says to house dick Will Wright, "Your umbrella must have gotten wet," he says, "That's what I bought it for." Good line -- and good movie.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that was the thing - I had heard of it only as it was mentioned in relation to "The Black Dahlia" case, and thinking I had heard it described as a 'crime/mystery' somewhere. But I also posted about something else related to the case - a tv mini-series or movie my aunt remembers being made in the 70's sometime, starring, inexplicably, Luci Arnaz as Elizabeth Short, for which I was also seeking information and/or anyone who recalled seeing it.

 

This case has always struck me as the US version of England's "Jack the Ripper' murders, in terms of the comperable infamy and savagery of the crimes themselves - but ultimately it is the undeniable allure of the sheer mystery, the 'WHO'? I assume that many of the world's most brilliant ctiminal minds of their times have given thorough attention to each of these cases over the years, apparently to little avail in both instances (although crime writer Patricia Cornwell avidly studied the 'Ripper' case for several years and feels that she has finally answered THAT question, presenting quite persuasive evidence in her non-fiction book about it - the EXACT title of which alludes me at the moment, although I believe it does contain the word, "Solved")

 

Obviously not all mysterys are noirs, but I am so enamored of mysterys, to wit, murder mysterys, that I'll watch even the ones with very obvious comedic bents, such as the Topper film, where murder victim Joan Blondell, I think it is, returns in ghostly form to prevail upon poor Topper to avenge her death, as well as the Red Skelton radio mystery guy films! Lovely, lovely noirs are my next favorite and I how I do love when both genres combine!

'

Link to post
Share on other sites

>>Well, that was the thing - I had heard of it only as it was mentioned in relation to "The Black Dahlia" case, and thinking I had heard it described as a 'crime/mystery' somewhere. But I also posted about something else related to the case - a tv mini-series or movie my aunt remembers being made in the 70's sometime, starring, inexplicably, Luci Arnaz as Elizabeth Short, for which I was also seeking information and/or anyone who recalled seeing it.

 

I saw that one. It's titled WHO IS THE BLACK DAHLIA and Efrem Zimbalist starred as the detective investigating the case. It aired on NBC in 1975 and I haven't seen it since. It may be considered blasphemy, but I really think that there should be a cable channel for reruns of TV movies as only a few of them made it to home video, but there were quite a few worthy of continued exposure. I'd give my eyeteeth to see GOODNIGHT, MY LOVE again, it was a neo-noir starring Richard Boone and Michael Dunn as a pair of investigators with Barbara Bain as the femme fatale and Victor Buono as the Greenstreet-like character.

 

While THE BLUE DAHLIA sounds like it might be based on the Black Dahlia case, there's another Alan Ladd movie that may have been inspired by it - CHICAGO DEADLINE. I've not seen it in about 30 years, but as I began reading of the Black Dahlia case, that was the first film that came to mind from that period.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}

> While THE BLUE DAHLIA sounds like it might be based on the Black Dahlia case, there's another Alan Ladd movie that may have been inspired by it - CHICAGO DEADLINE. I've not seen it in about 30 years, but as I began reading of the Black Dahlia case, that was the first film that came to mind from that period.

 

It is unfortunate that *Chicago Deadline* is also one of those Paramount movies in the MCA library, apparently. I'll bet chances of it showing up on TCM or on DVD are slim-to-none. :(

Link to post
Share on other sites

MCA has got to be the worst. Not only with the Paramount library, but with their own Universal product. They've got tons of stuff that could be packaged creatively for DVD sales, but beyond that, they don't seem to make much available for telecasting either. In the early days of AMC, I should have taken advantage and recorded the Universal films they aired from the 40s and 50s. If it doesn't fit the format of either the Sleuth or Sci-Fi channels they own, it seems to be unlikely they're ever going to open up the archives.

Link to post
Share on other sites

First, I want to mention an actor I neglected: Howard da Silva is very good in THE BLUE DAHLIA.

 

Having said that, I'd like to point out that there is no similarity to the Jack the Ripper murders -- there were at least six of them. And the Black Dahlia murder was notable for the savagery with which the victim was treated. In THE BLUE DAHLIA there was only one murder, and it couldn't be compared to the Black Dahlia case.

 

Two fictional treatments of the Black Dahlia case are James Ellroy's novel, called, not surprisingly, "The Black Dahlia." John Gregory Dunne wrote "True Confessions," which is a very serious book, dealing with moral choices, and also a very funny book -- a combination that's almost impossible to bring off, but he does it. It was made into an excellent film starring Robert Duvall and Robert DeNiro.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I fear that, in an effort to not repeat myself on this topic from the original post/thread I initiated in the 'Mystery' forum, I failed to make clear what I was trying to say re: the relationships between the two "Dahlia" films, as well as to the "Black Dahlia" case itself.

 

The ONLY way in which I had ever heard the film "The Blue Dahlia", mentioned in relation to the Elizabeth Short case - or at all - was in regard to the origin of the "Black Dahlia' nickname, i.e., that a diner employee on the PCH where Red Manley stopped to eat when Elizabeth travelled along with him for his sales job, had given her the nickname, having seen or heard of the currently showing, 'Blue Dahlia' film, and after being struck by her custom of dressing mostly in black. Now, whether this is the actual etiology of the moniker or not, the name was picked up by the press and it sure stuck. I never heard, or more importantly, meant to infer that there were similarities in plot or in content of any type in any 'Dahlia' film - or the real case itself - to each other

 

However, I think I was pretty clear in my comparison of the Short case to the Ripper murders, citing them as similar ONLY with regard to widespread and decades-long efforts to solve, savagery of the killings themselves (the savagery was different, true, but at some point its all pretty moot, imo.) and their notoriety..

 

I am hoping I will be able to watch on Wednesday night, and I will look for Howard da Silva's performance, as you have reccommended. As for the books on the Short case, I have read the Ellroy, and got the DVD for Christmas of the recent film. I also read a book about one woman's "theory" that her own father killed not only Short, but several other women in the Hollywood area, discussing at length documented information about the murders of these women that LAPD was attempting to solve around the same time period. The book is entitled, I think, "Daddy Was the 'Black Dahlia' Killer", and while the title could be improved upon, the book is persuasive. Were it presented as fiction, it would be a VERY interesting read - it is anyway. I can't recall the author's name, however I'd love to see a 'Dualing Daddy's' panel discussion, she against the ex-LA homocide cop who believes HIS father killed the 'Dahlia', and is equally persuasive. Perhaps on Dr. Phil or Oprah?;)

 

Message was edited by: Pia to say that my usual 'wink' emoticon doesn't seem to work on this board - the 'smile' works fine, though.:) No, it doesn't anymore, either.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Its great to find someone who saw this tv movie - and not only that, you remember the year, the network and the exact title. Thanks! And blasphemy or no, I am with you 100% on a channel like the one you describe. Actually, when Encore initiated its, 'Action Pack', around the beginning of the century (that sounds WEIRD!) and introduced their genre channels, I jumped for joy at a 24/7 MYSTERY channel - and it didn't disapoint. I no longer have it, having moved, but at that time, this college student was in heavenly bliss watching TV shows like, 'Burkes Law', and 'Ellery Queen', from the 60's, also England's, "Secret Agent', 'The Saint', and 'The Prisoner', also from the 60's. I also remember a very good 90's crime drama from Australia about a forensic psychiatrist called 'Jane Hailfax', and another about a PI (who was so Private, he had a dry-cleaning business as a 'front'), called 'Elvis - and whatever his last name was, I'll have to look it up, sorry!) In addition they showed mystery MOVIES from just about every decade, as I recall, and some wonderfully obscure ones. One in particular was a 1959 British film called, "Homicide", complete with a nice young chap who, quite normally retires to bed one evening in his (gorgeous) mews flat in London - only to awaken next morning on the couch of his country cottage front room. Naturally, he isn't alone, there being a corpse in the house with him - and of course, he has no recollection of any of it! I LOVED that movie, but there were others, too. Gosh, I miss having something like that on my cable system.

 

Your "Goodnight, My Love', and 'Chicago Deadline' also sound wonderful, too. wouldn't it be great if we all could somehow be able to design and program our own channels?!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

>>Your "Goodnight, My Love', and 'Chicago Deadline' also sound wonderful, too. wouldn't it be great if we all could somehow be able to design and program our own channels?!!

 

That day is coming, in one way or another. Pretty soon we'll be downloading titles straight from the studios, paying a fee of course. We'll just be limited to those titles that they care to make available. Their advantage in that is that they get to keep all the revenue, rather than share it with the cable channels as is presently done.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sadly ignorant on the topics of liscensing, revunes, leasing and who owns films, but I hope that whatever does happen in that area, that it is all 'equitable', somehow. I wouldn't be exactly comfortable with getting something so pleasurable if any one is getting 'cheated' in the bargain. Sigh, but then....

Link to post
Share on other sites

It just comes down to the same thing as is facing the future of car dealerships. The fewer middlemen means more profit to the supplier. One can order a car online now and I predict that soon dealerships will be limited to just being a service facility without the need for a large sales force. They may have some demo models to test drive, but I can see the suppliers looking to cut the costs pertaining to the present system.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}

> MCA has got to be the worst. Not only with the Paramount library, but with their own Universal product. They've got tons of stuff that could be packaged creatively for DVD sales, but beyond that, they don't seem to make much available for telecasting either. In the early days of AMC, I should have taken advantage and recorded the Universal films they aired from the 40s and 50s. If it doesn't fit the format of either the Sleuth or Sci-Fi channels they own, it seems to be unlikely they're ever going to open up the archives.

 

You're absolutely right, clore. I keep hearing that TCM has been working with Universal Home Video, and might soon have a deal in place to show more of what's in MCA's vault - both the Universal titles and the Paramount titles they control. If there is one thing that would definitely make 2009 an awesome year for TCM viewers, surely a comprehensive deal with Universal/MCA would be it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

>Well, that was the thing - I had heard of it only as it was mentioned in relation to "The Black Dahlia" case, and thinking I had heard it described as a 'crime/mystery' somewhere.

 

It's sort of a Southern California murder-mystery. Takes place mostly at night. But it lacks a lot of norish qualities, such as no New York brownstone walk-ups, no hiding in alleys, no stark New York type shadows.

 

So-Cal is ok for murder mysteries, but not appropriate for true noirs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought that I read about an agreement with MCA a while back, but they sure seem to be spoon feeding the product. Goodness, I see more Fox product of late on TCM and those guys already have their own venue. TCM has THE LODGER and the remake MAN IN THE ATTIC back-to-back coming up.

 

But with THE GLASS KEY, THE BIG CLOCK and THE BLUE DAHLIA all either scheduled or about to be, I sure hope that they will be followed by THE BLACK ANGEL, PHANTOM LADY, THE KILLERS, CRISS CROSS, MINISTRY OF FEAR, CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY and THE GLASS WEB. Not quite noir, but it would be nice to see THE TATTERED DRESS again.

 

And as much Alan Ladd as possible would be nice. Were I at MCA, I'd have already issued DVD box sets for Ladd, Maria Montez, Tony Curtis and Audie Murphy. Oh - and all of the Randolph Scott Zane Grey westerns from the early 30s.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well at least *The Big Clock* is available on DVD.

 

The one MCA title I do wish they could show on TCM is *I Walk Alone* with Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas (their first movie together, and a darn good noir). It has never been available on video in any format, to the best of my knowledge, and it's part of the Paramount titles they control, I believe.

 

P.S. The trailer for *The Blue Dahlia* is available here:

http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/index/?o_cid=mediaroomlink&cid=215722

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> >Well, that was the thing - I had heard of it only as it was mentioned in relation to "The Black Dahlia" case, and thinking I had heard it described as a 'crime/mystery' somewhere.

>

> It's sort of a Southern California murder-mystery. Takes place mostly at night. But it lacks a lot of norish qualities, such as no New York brownstone walk-ups, no hiding in alleys, no stark New York type shadows.

 

 

I agree about New York as being probably the most 'noir' city and somehow Chicago, while it has its share of good murders and mysteries - real and cimematic - I always think of as more 'gangster'/gangland, obviously as the midwest was the hub of the 20s & 30's crime/gang activity both urban as well as rural.

 

> So-Cal is ok for murder mysteries, but not appropriate for true noirs.

 

Do you think that the likes of Raymond Chandler or Dashiel Hammet had an impact on 'noir-izing' Los Angeles somewhat? And more recently Ellroy? He speaks of being supremely influenced by what he considers the quite fertile ground of the ' LA murder mystery', no doubt flagshipped by his own mother's murder case when he was a little boy

 

Message was edited by: Pia

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}

> I thought that I read about an agreement with MCA a while back, but they sure seem to be spoon feeding the product. Goodness, I see more Fox product of late on TCM and those guys already have their own venue. TCM has THE LODGER and the remake MAN IN THE ATTIC back-to-back coming up.

>

> But with THE GLASS KEY, THE BIG CLOCK and THE BLUE DAHLIA all either scheduled or about to be, I sure hope that they will be followed by THE BLACK ANGEL, PHANTOM LADY, THE KILLERS, CRISS CROSS, MINISTRY OF FEAR, CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY and THE GLASS WEB. Not quite noir, but it would be nice to see THE TATTERED DRESS again.

 

 

 

And I've just gotten 'Old Reliable' (our ancient VCR) hooked back up again! Oh boy!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have yet to get a DVD recorder, but until I do, I pass on saving the color or letterboxed offerings on TCM. I don't mind watching full screen black-and-white on VHS, so I'll be taping quite a few myself once they become available.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...