Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

"THE BLUE DAHLIA" on TCM 1/10/09


Recommended Posts

>Do you think that the likes of Raymond Chandler or Dashiel Hammet had an impact on 'noir-izing' Los Angeles somewhat? And more recently Ellroy? He speaks of being supremely influenced by what he considers the quite fertile ground of the ' LA murder mystery', no doubt flagshipped by his own mother's murder case when he was a little boy

 

Well, there are murders in the area, but the whole city seems to be too open, with too much space, and too many parks and beaches for me to think of it as a noir city.

 

New York, on the other hand, is a tightly packed city, and the only nearby water is the kind bodies are dumped in.

Link to post
Share on other sites

And THE BLUE DAHLIA will play back-to-back with THE DARK CORNER on that night. That makes for a nice noir double-bill.

 

What really intrigues me about the April sked is that the 1929 SHOWBOAT is listed to air.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}

> And THE BLUE DAHLIA will play back-to-back with THE DARK CORNER on that night. That makes for a nice noir double-bill.

 

I don't think I've ever seen *The Dark Corner*, but it sounds intriguing.

 

> What really intrigues me about the April sked is that the 1929 SHOWBOAT is listed to air.

 

Have you seen it before? How about the 1936 version?

Link to post
Share on other sites

THE DARK CORNER is terrific, with Clifton Webb in one of his patented waspish roles, and William Bendix as a thug (watch what happens when they meet in an office building). Lucille Ball is used to good advantage, and the plot is a doozy.

 

I've seen only the 1936 SHOWBOAT. Helen Morgan sings "Bill," and Paul Robeson sings "Ol' Man River." Enough said?

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=faceinthecrowd wrote:}{quote}

> THE DARK CORNER is terrific, with Clifton Webb in one of his patented waspish roles, and William Bendix as a thug (watch what happens when they meet in an office building). Lucille Ball is used to good advantage, and the plot is a doozy.

 

I would definitely like to watch it. I like all of those actors a lot.

 

> I've seen only the 1936 SHOWBOAT. Helen Morgan sings "Bill," and Paul Robeson sings "Ol' Man River." Enough said?

 

I think I got my recording from TCM, it's a great version and Irene Dunne is very good in it. Of course, the whole cast was good, from what I can remember.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fred, thank you SO much for the Bradbury Building link! After touring that wonderful place, I 'walked over' to Angels Flight, and stood at its 'feet' through over a hundred years, thrilled to discover its film and tv history as well. I lived in L:A for two years, but sadly my memories of downtown are of distracted trips to hectically wedding shop. Did I read somewhere that 'Criss Cross' is being replayed soon? I'll watch for Angels Flight to appear, glimpsed through a window in a passing-time shot.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1929 SHOW BOAT is one that I've missed. It's a real curiosity piece for me as it started out as a silent version of the Ferber book, but musical numbers were grafted onto it once the play became a hit.

 

At least that's what I've read.

 

I've seen the 1936 version many times, the first time back in the 60s at a screening held by William K. Everson. I didn't know who Allan Jones was at the time, but I was struck by his resemblance to his son Jack. So, there I am, 14 years old and telling this to Everson, who was most patient with this youngster. At least I did know of James Whale at the time, and was able to spot "Ming the Merciless" - Charles Middleton - in a bit role. At this screening, the audience applauded when Robeson finished singing "Old Man River."

 

I'm not so fond of the MGM version, but it is pretty. Maybe some of my displeasure with it is because it kept the earlier film out of circulation for many years - the Everson screening was one that wasn't and couldn't be publicized, we were just told that it would be a rare screening of a major 30s musical.

 

Do catch THE DARK CORNER. It's got some really great NYC location photography and Clifton Webb is back playing a variation on Waldo Lydecker. He's got a great line of dialogue that I'll never forget:

 

"How I detest the dawn. The grass always looks like it's been left out all night."

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}

> The 1929 SHOW BOAT is one that I've missed. It's a real curiosity piece for me as it started out as a silent version of the Ferber book, but musical numbers were grafted onto it once the play became a hit.

>

 

Yes, those early talkies, like *Rio Rita*, are a mixed bag sometimes, and they can certainly seem dated. But it's still great to know they'll be showing it on TCM. That's the only one I don't have in my collection.

Link to post
Share on other sites

After you've seen the 1936 SHOW BOAT, the others are interesting only as curiosities. Helen Morgan shows why she was the ultimate torch singer -- her "Bill" is unforgettable.

Irene Dunne is very appealing, too. And Robeson's "Old Man River" is one of the greatest moments in film musicals.

 

In THE DARK CORNER there's another great line, this one from Mark Stevens:

 

"For six bits you'd hang your mother on a meat hook."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Preston Sturges would disagree with you. I'm currently reading a bio on Veronica. In it Preston said VL had considerable, natural talent and her career was completely mishandled by the executives at Paramount who didn't seem to know exactly what to do with Lake. Sturges said Veronica could film any scene in one or two takes and he was hoping to re-team with Lake on more projects but Paramount had other plans. I always thought Lake was adept at noir and i've seen her do well in a western and a period piece.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=faceinthecrowd wrote:}{quote}

> If only Veronica Lake's talent had been equal to her looks.

 

Ouch! :P

 

> {quote:title=randyishere wrote:}{quote}

> I'm currently reading a bio on Veronica. In it Preston said VL had considerable, natural talent and her career was completely mishandled by the executives at Paramount who didn't seem to know exactly what to do with Lake.

 

That does sound familiar, now that I think about it. I wonder who that biographer is.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking of THIS GUN FOR HIRE, but that may have been an aberration. I'm not saying she was bad in TGFH, just that she was kind of bland -- unless you were looking at her, in which case you would be too dazzled to critique her performance.

Link to post
Share on other sites

After I watch the DVDs I bought recently (there are quite a few of them) I'm going to subscribe to Netflix, and I'll put some of the movies you mentioned on my list.

 

I want to check some Lake films that I haven't seen for a while. Watching a beautiful blonde? It's a tough job, but somebody has to do it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Even though I've seen this film several times, it was nice to re-visit it. Bendix steals the show. Chandler's script has lots of snappy dialogue, as do his novels. Veronica Lake looks better than I remembered. Every time I see Will Wright, I think of the I Love Lucy episode where he plays the sheriff of Bent Fork, Tennessee, with two chubby daughters -Teentsie and Weentsie, who perform "Ricochet Romance."

 

Who calls their kid Dickie? And why is Doris Dowling making out with Benjamin Franklin?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Doris Dowling was a good actress, and very attractive. She deserved to have a bigger career; she's not even listed in Ephraim Katz's Film Encyclopedia. She had a good role in THE LOST WEEKEND, but aside from that, the only film I remember her in was a western, the title of which eludes me.

 

I liked Will Wright's line when a cop tells him, "Your umbrella must have gotten wet." Will replies, "That's what I bought it for."

 

The name Dickie may have been influenced by the child star Dickie Moore. It still sounds like something you wear, rather than something you name a child.

 

A good movie, and good work by all concerned.

Link to post
Share on other sites

wow, what a fantastic movie all around The Blue Dahlia is!

the story was exciting, but those early scenes in the car with Alan and Veronica just talking were probably my favorite parts. they could've made the whole movie just those two shooting the breeze for 90 minutes and i would've still loved it. Alan Ladd's voice is so relaxing to listen to, and i will never get tired of staring at Veronica Lake. Has there ever been a more gorgeous actress than Ms. Lake in this movie? i think not. and her acting talents were perfectly fine here.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...