Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

A Streetcar Named Desire


Recommended Posts

Is anyone going to watch A Streetcar Named Desire tonight at 11:00 p.m. EST on TCM? I think this is a great film. Has anyone else seen it and wish to share your thoughts?

 

What is your favorite scene in this film?

 

I liked where Stanley "clears the table".....

 

I look forward to reading your comments about this excellent film. TCM doesn't show it too often, so I'm looking forward to seeing it again.

 

Message was edited by: movielover11

 

Message was edited by: movielover11

Link to post
Share on other sites

The play and film certainly did set the art and craft of acting on its ear when they first appeared but, looked at through the prism of nearly sixty years A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE is increasingly creaky, tired, pretentious drivel. The film is tedious in the extreme, and almost unwatchable today.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't keep my eyes open at 11:00 p.m. Why do they always show this so late? I have seen A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE a couple of times and am always floored by the acting and comeradierie between Vivien Leigh and Marlon Brando. They had great chemistry. The movie is one of those films that you can watch over and over again without ever getting tired of it. I love this movie.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be watching it tonight, Movielover11...

I, for one, love Tennessee Williams' plays....

I love Blanch's delicate style from paper lamp shades and spritzy perfume bottles,

to Stanley's brassiness, his pushing his pals back down in their seats, when they get

up out of courteousness, when Blanch & Stella walk into the room, & states, "Oh, please,

don't get up...." and Stanley quips back, " Don't worry, no one's getting up.."

I love Stella's gentleness in trying to appease her sister and making her feel calm & welcomed,

to her earththiness, & her animalistic response to Stanley's demands.......

And, yes, I too love that scene where he 'clears off the table, ...' He sort of puts everyone

back into their places....I just love it.

I remember reading this book in high school and my teacher commented that the paper shade

Blanch needed to use, was really to cover up the truth & hide from it

"Flores para los muertas"....that cry was such a haunting scene too.

I also love that 'old world' of New Orleans & those wrought iron fencing.....I can almost feel

the heat from that movie.

Enjoy !

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=movielover11 wrote:} I had read that when Streetcar came out on Broadway in the late 1940's - the lines were wrapped around the block - it was a smash hit....and Jessica Tandy played Blanche Dubois in the Broadway version along with unknown Brando...{quote}

 

The young Jack Palance played Stanley Kowalski in the play's national company, and then replaced Brando on Broadway. Many who saw it with both men, including critics, thought Palance was better than Brando.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw this movie on TCM last night and all I can say is THANK YOU TCM for showing this gem. It's been quite some time since I saw it, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. Vivien Leigh was awesome as Blanche and Marlon Brando's performance was riveting.

 

I had read that Burt Lancaster was selected for the role of Stanley on Broadway and turned it down giving a relatively unknown guy Marlon Brando the opportunity to play the role that catupulted him to fame. I bet Lancaster kicked himself for turning down the role. But I don't think anyone can play a better "Stanley" than Brando - it's been tried many times, but nobody can recreate it - Brando made this role his own. Great film.

 

Message was edited by: newclassicfilmfan

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 11 years later...

The acting in this picture is simply superb! Karl Malden 's scenes with Vivien Leigh are so deep.  Her poetic  sentences paint a colorful picture of love, when she and Mitch are at the bar dancing.  The sad reverie that she sinks so very low into, recalling her Young Boy she was married to and who took his life!  Each scene is so rich with dialogue and subtext.  Great direction and camera work.   The stage version took more liberties and in it Stanley rapes BLANCHE!  It was taken out of the script for this picture by the Hayes Office!  I love Tennessee Williams writing...always drawing from his Southern upbringing, faded glory of southern gentility and gallantry....gone awry! 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I welcome you to these boards.  Although I do agree with your well written reply,  it really isn't necessary for you to "catch up" with the last dozen years of threads.  

Start a new one stating who you are and what turns you on "classic" movie-wise.  ;)

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
On ‎11‎/‎8‎/‎2008 at 6:55 AM, CineSage_jr said:

> {quote:title=movielover11 wrote:} I had read that when Streetcar came out on Broadway in the late 1940's - the lines were wrapped around the block - it was a smash hit....and Jessica Tandy played Blanche Dubois in the Broadway version along with unknown Brando...{quote}

 

The young Jack Palance played Stanley Kowalski in the play's national company, and then replaced Brando on Broadway. Many who saw it with both men, including critics, thought Palance was better than Brando.

I don't pay too much attention to what the critics say, never have and never will. Plus I've never been a big fan of Jack Palance.

Brando WAS Stanley Kowalski. 

Sorry you didn't like the 1951 film, but to me it's still a great movie with top-notch performances from Brando, Vivien Leigh, Karl Malden and KIm Hunter.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I don't pay too much attention to what the critics say, never have and never will. Plus I've never been a big fan of Jack Palance.

Brando WAS Stanley Kowalski. 

Sorry you didn't like the 1951 film, but to me it's still a great movie with top-notch performances from Brando, Vivien Leigh, Karl Malden and KIm Hunter.

Hey,  maybe they have seen the film again and now like it,  since that comment was from 2008.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...