Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
cmvgor

[b]I Said / His Lordship Said... Anglo-American Expressions[/b]

Recommended Posts

BRIT: Honestly, who puts a telly in the loo? *

AMER: Heck, who puts a TV in the bathroom?

 

...*Verbatum from an ad for ATT Uvers Direct TV system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT: He's come over peculiar. *

AMER: He's feeling sick.

 

...*verbatum from the BBC sitcom Are You Being Served?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT -- Gamp*

AMER -- Bummershoot

 

Along with "brolly, etc, another term for 'Umbrella'

 

...*Turned up in a crossword, and checked out on the internet dictionary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT: I got took queer.*

AMER: I got sick.

 

...*Verbatum from the script of Simon Grey's 1971 stage drama Butley. Following lines in the same scene point out that this usage was now archaic, due to the evolved meaning of the key term.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT -- Gaffer

AMER -- Old-timer

 

...Used to refer to, or to address, an older man. Is often used with respect, or even affection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT -- To do a runner

AMER -- To walk the check

 

...i.e, to eat at a reastaurant and then leave without paying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT -- Do a Davon Loch*

AMER -- Snatch defeat from the jaws of victory

 

...*Uses the name of a racehorse, a favorite, who lost a race in the last possible second, after what looked like a winning run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*At the butcher shop:*

 

BRIT -- Cutlets

AMER -- Chops

 

...In his autobiography, George Burns relates that he and Gracie Allen had a routine in their act that used repeated references to "lamb chops" as laugh lines. Touring England, they took a friend's advice and changed the wording to "lamb cutlets", so the new audience would understand them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT -- Police income tax*

AMER -- The pad, shakedown, "on the pad"

 

...Money extorted from businesses by the police, especially to gain lax enforcement. (A barber who also functioned as a bookie, etc.)

 

*...From "In come the police and you pay the tax."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> BRIT -- Police income tax*

> AMER -- The pad, shakedown, "on the pad"

>

> ...Money extorted from businesses by the police, especially to gain lax enforcement. (A barber who also functioned as a bookie, etc.)

>

> *...From "In come the police and you pay the tax."

Verbatum from the 1979 film *The Human Factor* Sourced from a novel by Graham Greene, and scripted by Tom Stoppard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT -- Fascia *

AMER -- Dashboard (auto)

 

*...Turned up in a crossword, and checked out in the Online Dictionary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT: Catapult *

AMER: Slingshot.

 

...*A memory dredged up from one of the Lord Peter Whimsy mysteries on BBC. A mention was made that someone was killed with a "catapult", and I stayed with the story to see how someone in this day & age got killed with one of those Medevial siege machines used to knock down castle walls. It was something of a letdown when Lord Peter produced a slingshot and a few steel ball bearings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

_Military Context_ :

 

BRIT: Sapper

AMER: Combat Engineer

 

...Frontline troops specially trained to deal with "sapping" fortifications, clearing mine fields, road-and-bridge building, etc. Their earliest missions had to do with digging under castle walls during a siege.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT: "They're on the Dole."

AMER: "They're on Welfare."

 

...Cribbed from a passing remark in the world premier of *The Special Relationship* , broadcast on HBO tonight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRIT: Snogging.

AMER: Kissing, making out.

 

...Picked up from the Hogwarts students in the new Harry Potter movie that premiered on TV tonight.

Don't know if mudbloods use the same expression.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=cmvgor wrote:}{quote}

> BRIT: Snogging.

> AMER: Kissing, making out.

>

> ...Picked up from the Hogwarts students in the new Harry Potter movie that premiered on TV tonight.

> Don't know if mudbloods use the same expression.

 

Musused a term.

Instead of "mudbloods", I ment to say "_muggles_".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=pastman wrote:}{quote}

> BRIT: "That bloke is wearing a syrup!"

> AMER: "That guy's wearing a wig!"

 

Cockney rhyming slang is so wierd...how about

Brit: Telling porkies

American: Lying

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about some slang? Not sure how up to date this is--got it from one of my daughters Georgia Nicolson books (which are very funny, btw)

 

Brit: chav

American: ghetto, trashy

 

Brit: ****

Amer: geek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...