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New PBS documentary "Cinema?s Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood"!


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*WOW ...THIS LQQKS FASCINATING!!! Very fascinating!!*

 

*Here in Phoenix, Arizona (MT) this won't air till: Wednesday, January 7, 10:30pm!*

 

*'Cinema's Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood'*.

 

 

_CINEMA?S EXILES: FROM HITLER TO HOLLYWOOD_ traces the experiences of the Jews who fled Nazi Germany and took refuge in Hollywood, and examines their impact on both the German and the American cinemas.

 

 

 

*'Cinema's Exiles' tells the story of artists who left Hitler's Reich for American film careers.*

 

 

By Susan King

January 3, 2009

Los Angeles Times, CA

 

 

From the time Adolf Hitler became Germany's chancellor in 1933 to the opening salvos of World War II in 1939, about 800 actors, directors, writers, composers and producers fled Europe for the safety of America. The Third Reich's loss was Hollywood's gain as the infusion of artistic talent changed moviemaking for decades to come.

 

 

*A new PBS documentary, "Cinema?s Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood," which airs at 8 tonight on KCET, charts the contributions these emigres -- many of them secular Jews -- made in their adopted homeland.*

 

 

*Among the talent were directors Billy Wilder ("Sunset Boulevard," "Some Like It Hot"), Fritz Lang ("Fury," "The Big Heat"), Henry Koster ("Harvey"), Fred Zinnemann ("High Noon," "From Here to Eternity") and Robert Siodmak ("The Killers"); composers Frederick Hollander, Franz Waxman and Erich Wolfgang Korngold; cinematographer Rudolph Mate; and actors such as Hedy Lamarr and Peter Lorre. And there were others who left Germany before Hitler took power, including director Ernst Lubitsch and actress Marlene Dietrich.*

 

"So many people who came to our shores just picked up and made a life for themselves here," said "Exiles" writer and director Karen Thomas. "So few of them, and this is what really surprised me, looked back or appeared to be angry about what happened. Some of them did struggle, but they were too busy having a life."

 

This is not to say they didn't suffer. They were forced to mourn the tragic loss of family and friends in their homeland who became the inevitable casualties of either the war or the Holocaust. (The mother, stepfather and grandmother of Austrian-born Billy Wilder perished at Auschwitz.)

 

The Oscar-winning 1942 World War II classic "Casablanca" is just one of many films populated with these exiles. Actors Paul Henreid, Conrad Veidt, Lorre, S.Z. Sakall, Leonid Kinskey, Helmut Dantine, Marcel Dalio, Ludwig St?ssel and Wolfgang Zilzer all came to America to avoid Nazi rule.

 

*"I think if anybody watches this film, they are not going to look at 'Casablanca' the same way again," said Thomas.*

 

Before the rise of the Nazi party, German cinema was celebrated for its innovation and creativity. In 1920, the German Expressionistic film movement was born with the nightmarish "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari." Other German films -- under the guiding force of producer Erich Pommer -- followed: F.W. Murnau's "Nosferatu" and "The Last Laugh," and Lang's "Metropolis."

 

But this kind of film -- many are regarded as masterpieces -- disappeared as soon as the Nazis came to power and seized control of Germany's film studios. The exodus of cinema artists began quickly. Most got out with little more than the shirts on their back and a pittance to start their new lives.

 

Paul Kohner, who eventually opened up a Hollywood talent agency, and his wife, actress Lupita Tovar, smuggled money to help former colleagues.

 

After he returned to Hollywood, Kohner kept trying to get artists and their families out of Europe. In letter after letter, Kohner pleads with people to leave Germany. But not everyone saw the situation as dire.

 

"There is a moment when one director in Berlin didn't really think he needed to come to America," said Thomas. "But Paul Kohner kept writing him, saying, 'I can get you a job if you want to come.' But by the time the man wrote in 1938 wanting to come, Kohner had to tell him, 'I can't do

anything for you now. It's too late.' "

 

 

 

*Cinema's Exiles | PBS*

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/cinemasexiles/

 

susan.king@latimes.com

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I found this book too:

 

 

darkmirror1.jpg

 

*The Dark Mirror: German Cinema between Hitler and Hollywood*

*By Lutz Koepnick*

 

 

*_Product Description_*

 

 

Lutz Koepnick analyzes the complicated relationship between two cinemas--Hollywood's and Nazi Germany's--in this theoretically and politically incisive study. _The Dark Mirror_ examines the split course of German popular film from the early 1930s until the mid 1950s, showing how Nazi filmmakers appropriated Hollywood conventions and how German film exiles reworked German cultural material in their efforts to find a working base in the Hollywood studio system. Through detailed readings of specific films, Koepnick provides a vivid sense of the give and take between German and American cinema.

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I saw it listed on my Directv PBS program guide but I couldn't watch it because PBS won't allow Directv to give me the channel. Has to do with some stupid reason that I have a local PBS station but has different programming criteria.

 

Hopefully I might get to watch it in the future. A&E may be my best chance.

 

Remember Germany lost a lot of its best due to their twisted eugenics policies. Well we did reap the reward of people coming here to flee tyranny (scholars, scientist, people within the arts, etc.)

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Happened to see it listed in a NYC paper so I checked our local PBS station and they just "threw it away" at 3am without any publicity. I was able to record it.

 

I sent you a PM, check your mail.

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Thanks!!

 

 

*_Also:_*

 

By BRIAN LOWRY

variety.com

 

 

*Cinema's Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood*

 

Narrator: Sigourney Weaver

 

 

*Anybody with a passion for movies of the 1930s, '40s and '50s will find more than a mere walk down memory lane in this PBS documentary, which charts the Jewish ?migr?s that fled Hitler's Germany and found sanctuary -- with various degrees of comfort and success -- in Hollywood, prompting the town to be nicknamed "Weimar on the Pacific." Exploring the stories of those displaced by the Nazis adds a layer of resonance to their films, from "Casablanca" to "High Noon." Most profound, perhaps, is the filmmakers' impact on horror, given the real-life horrors that they left behind.*

 

 

 

Narrated by Sigourney Weaver, "Cinema's Exiles" begins with the golden age of German cinema that preceded Hitler's rise, with such landmark films as "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" and "M." In the '30s, however, with Hitler's propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels announcing plans to seize control of the movie industry, more than 800 members of Germany's creative community departed for Hollywood, where hurdles included actors' accents and writers having to master expressing themselves in a new language.

 

Some adapted better than others, with director Fritz Lang, for example, chafing against the studio system, while Ernst Lubitsch thrived and also loaded "Ninotchka" with fellow expatriates. The archival footage draws on interviews with directors such as Lang, Billy Wilder and Fred Zinnemann, whose portrait of mustering courage to stand alone against evil in "High Noon" takes on new dimensions viewed through this prism.

 

Although there was a collective of escaped Germans that helped support new arrivals, not everyone made the transition equally well. The documentary flits around a bit promiscuously, understandably, to reflect the breadth of talent and their personal histories, from actors Marlene Dietrich and Peter Lorre to composer Erich Wolfgang Korngold ("The Adventures of Robin Hood") to directors such as Lubitsch and Wilder.

 

TCM has stolen some of PBS' thunder as a sober chronicler of movie history (coupling its original documentaries with themed movie retrospectives), but when it comes to exhibiting an appreciation for film history, the more the merrier. As such, "Cinema's Exiles" is a first-class way to ring in the new year.

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I really enjoyed this, much more than the Warner Brothers special from a couple of months ago. I did record this also, it's something I think can be watched again and again. Very interesting, and instead of the historical aspect dragging it down, it moved along at a nice clip.

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I have the same problem. I used to love watching the national PBS feed on DirecTV until my local PBS station was added. Now I can only watch the local PBS station and they don't show half the stuff that's on the national PBS feed. I used to watch a lot of great shows on the national PBS channel that I cannot see on the local PBS channel.

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LOL..... About next week...I will pop the popcorn! Happy New Year BTW!!

 

*Anyways ...here is a link ...try this for local date & time showing ....It was also at the bottom of the article!*

 

 

*_Cinema's Exiles | PBS_*

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/cinemasexiles/

 

 

 

*WOW ...U Can it even get it on DVD!!!*

 

 

*Shadows in Paradise: Hitler's Exiles in Hollywood DVD*

 

http://www.shoppbs.org/sm-pbs-shadows-in-paradise-hitlers-exiles-in-hollywood-dvd--pi-3303081.html

 

 

 

*_Description_:*

 

 

By 1939, 30,000 intellectuals and radicals were exiled from Europe; 80% were Jewish. These dramatic events sent many of the greatest minds of the 20th century into exile in the United States. In some ways, Los Angeles in the 30s and early 40s may be seen as its afterglow when scores of ?migr?s, fleeing the upsurge of European fascism, briefly transformed Southern California into one of the capitals of world culture.

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*Don't Forget _Cinema's Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood_ will air on Wednesday, January 07, 2008 here in Phoenix, Arizona (MT) @ 10:30pm!*

 

 

*CINEMA?S EXILES: FROM HITLER TO HOLLYWOOD traces the experiences of the Jews who fled Nazi Germany and took refuge in Hollywood, and examines their impact on both the German and the American cinemas.*

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WOW! Damn good documentary! Very well put together!

 

When the article states:

"I think if anybody watches this film, they are not going to look at 'Casablanca' the same way again," said Thomas."...I 100% agree...When the article stated this about "Cinema?s Exiles", it wasn't lying. When the documentary pointed out all the exiled actors in _Casablanca_ (1942), I was blown away!!!

 

I MUST SEE!

 

A+!

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A friend of mine (who has no knowledge of old movies) saw it last week. He said it was really good, very interesting and it made him want to watch *M* and many of the other movies shown in the doc. Hooray!

 

However, My local PBS station is not showing it. WGBH is another PBS station that I get, but they are showing it at 4:00 AM on Friday. I am quite disgruntled over the turn PBS has taken over the last 5 years or so. The quality just isn't always there nowadays, even for major presentations (which this obviously is not). Not to mention the ridiculous scheduling - ( sometimes we will show Masterpiece Theatre, but then maybe not for a few months. Perhaps there are no more masterpieces out there?). How could they have declined so far?

 

I will be excited if I can get a copy of this one and actually WATCH it.

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I just ordered the documentary off of the PBS website/...I called my other-dad last night at 10:30 pm (Arizona Time!) I have been turning him into a "Classic" film fan & I was like "U have to watch this documentary!!!"......IT blew me away..once I started watching it I couldn't turn away!

 

My partner loves all the documentaries that TCM does, BUT the documentaries that PBS does on film are very well put together, & go beyond the gloss and glitz of "The Golden Age" of Hollywood and give a realistic view of the struggles and hardship of "NOT" ONLY an actor, But the the crew itself!!

 

I don't know about U, but I won't be able to watch _Casablanca_ (1942) the same way again after learning all the actors back stories. I mean some of them Peter Lorre, Joy Page, Conrad Veid, Gino Corrado etc..etc.. were big names on stage and film in Europe, then BAM Hitler comes into power, they flee the country for freedom and a career again, but here in America they are reduced to bit parts, then later on they are called a "Character Actor"!

 

 

*"Cinema?s Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood" - Needs to be Seen!*

 

Very Sad and very enlightening documentary!

 

 

*FINAL RATING - "Cinema?s Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood" - A+*

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> {quote:title=CelluloidKid wrote:} > I don't know about U, but I won't be able to watch _Casablanca_ (1942) the same way again after learning all the actors back stories. I mean some of them Peter Lorre, Joy Page, Conrad Veid, Gino Corrado etc..etc.. were big names on stage and film in Europe, then BAM Hitler comes into power, they flee the country for freedom and a career again, but here in America they are reduced to bit parts, then later on they are called a "Character Actor"! {quote}

 

Joy Page (1924-2008) was an American, born and bred in Los Angeles. She was, in fact, studio chief Jack L. Warner's step-daughter, and not a "big name" anywhere, even in the Warner household, since J.L. wasn't especially keen on her becoming an actress, or appearing in CASABLANCA.

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Sorry if I got some of names wrong...but a goo chuck of the actors were exiled! Thanks for pointing out my bad! Have U watched _Cinema's Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood_!? Good documentary!

 

The name that I ment to say for the film _Casablanca_ (1942) were:

 

Paul Henreid, Conrad Veidt, Lorre, S.Z. Sakall, Leonid Kinskey, Helmut Dantine, Marcel Dalio, Ludwig St?ssel and Wolfgang Zilzer

 

 

_Casablanca_ (1942), trust me & when U watch the documentary, U won't view _Casablanca_ (1942) in the same light!

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It was very good; knowing what these refugees endured while trying to restart their careers from the ground up is very inspiring! It was a revelation to me that some of our "character actors" had been major stars in Europe. It must have been quite the culture shock. I did miss the last half hour however; was any mention made of the American actors who left Hollywood to fight in the war, and if that improved the options available for these European actors, at least for the duration? Even if it didn't change the equation, I would have been curious about that.

 

Message was edited by: casablancalover

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From what I remember, it briefly mention some the American actors who went to fight in the war!

 

 

What I found really surprising was when the documentary showed footage from the film _Casablanca_ (1942), & then it went from one actor to the next describing who was a real life exile playing an on-screen exile.......Fascinating! (Actors Paul Henreid, Conrad Veidt, Lorre, S.Z. Sakall, Leonid Kinskey, Helmut Dantine, Marcel Dalio, Ludwig St?ssel and Wolfgang Zilzer)

 

 

Sad that many of the actors that were in _Casablanca_ (1942), at one (1) time these actor were big names over-seas, Both on stage and film; then BAM! They come to America to escape Nazi power, & now they are reduced to a simple character actor! WOW!

 

 

I thought was really fascinating was that S.Z. Sakall was arrested (I believe the documentary) stated at least 3xs for his political views, and he escaped Budapest "Before" the Nazi's rise to power. WOW!

 

I can't believe that more than 800 film professionals escaped to Hollywood in the years between 1933 and 1939. The list includes actors Felix Bressart, Hedy Lamarr and Peter Lorre; directors Fritz Lang, Henry Koster, Billy Wilder and Fred Zinnemann; composers Frederick Hollander, Erich Wolfgang Korngold and Franz Waxman; and cinematographer Rudy Mate.

 

 

*Simply amazing!*

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*Has anyone else watched "_Cinema's Exiles: From Hitler to Hollywood_?!!..*

 

*Well anybody else watch this documentary!??!*

 

 

Anybody with a passion for movies of the 1930s, ?40s and ?50s will find more than a mere walk down memory lane in this PBS documentary, which charts the Jewish ?migr?s that fled Hitler?s Germany and found sanctuary ? with various degrees of comfort and success ? in Hollywood, prompting the town to be nicknamed ?Weimar on the Pacific.?

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