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AndyO

Your Favorite Scene

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Pardon me if this has already been done to death somewhere else on the board but I'm wondering what might be your all-time favorite movie scene? What scene is it that always makes you sit up and pay attention? For me there are two that come to mind. First off, from "Zulu" when the soldiers sing "Men of Harlech" but my all-time favorite scene is Paul Henreid leading the singing of La Marseillaise in "Casablanca". How about you?

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The scene in "Casablanca" you just mentioned is pretty compelling. Another one for me would be Vito Corleone arriving on Ellis Island just a few years into the 20th century. So much yearning and hope in the faces of all those newly arrived immigrants.

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There are so many scenes that we all know and love. One of my favorites is the opening scene from *The Light That Failed*. It features two kids and a goat on a seashore in England. The screen reads "England, Fort Keeling, 1865." The kids grow up to be Ronald Colman and Muriel Angelus. It's a beautiful, evocative, scene from a haunting movie that is too often only remembered as an Ida Lupino vehicle.

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The Fervent, Desperate Prayer of a tormented Man, whose life is about to 'Fall Apart',

 

is passionately portrayed by James Stewart @ Martini's bar, in "It's a Wonderful Life".

 

With both hands clenched together @ an attempt to a Prayer, @ the bar,

 

George Bailey begins his plea in a desperate whisper, "Dear God, I'm not a Praying Man...."

 

A very Powerful Moment. . . It gets me everytime, knowing that we've all been in that

 

particular, dire straights @ one point or another, sometime in our lives, Seeking GOD,

 

grasping for help.

 

Ugaarte

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My favorites:

 

In *Meet Me in St. Louis* when Judy Garland sings "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," then the father decides the family can stay in St. Louis. I also love the very final moments of the film, as the family watches the World's Fair lights up.

 

In *Miracle on 34th Street* when the mail sacks of letters to Santa arrive in the courtroom.

 

The final scene in the airport in a newer film, *Love, Actually* --- I defy anyone not to get a little teary-eyed. If you haven't seen this often-overlooked Hugh Grant movie, do yourself a favor.

 

Hmmm, all movies that are partly set at Christmastime.

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I'll take just about any scene involving an exchange between Clint Eastwood and Bradford Dillman from the Dirty Harry movies. They are hysterical.

 

Samples:

 

Sudden Impact

 

Dillman: "You know my reputation?"

Eastwood: "Yeah. You're a legend in your own mind."

 

The Enforcer

 

Dillman: "You took out two front doors, one front window, 12 feet of counter. Plus damages to the stock, plus one city vehicle totaled. Not to mention three hostages in the hospital, all of whom will probably sue the city."

Eastwood: "For what?"

Dillman: "Excessive use of force. For your information, Callahan, the minority community has just about had it with this kind of police work."

Eastwood: "By the "minority community", I suppose you're talking about the hoods."

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In We Three: Margaret Hamilton (Grandma Tilford's maid) slapping Bonita Granville (Mary Tilford) who had it coming!

 

Oh wasn't Bonita so very good in that movie. Bob O. has commented on her superb performance.

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One if the best scenes ever is Joan Crawford getting slapped by Ann Blythe in Mildred Pierce. How fierce and intimidating that must have been for the young Blythe.

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I completely agree with *ChipHeartsMovies* on: *?Meet Me in St. Louis when Judy Garland sings "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," then the father decides the family can stay in St. Louis. I also love the very final moments of the film, as the family watches the World's Fair lights up.?* Plus the other wonderful Garland songs: ?The Trolley Song? and ?The Boy Next Door.? I really think this was one of Judy?s best ? it?s my favorite of hers ? and one of my favorites period. The family life portrayed is ideal and idyllic. Can I go there now?

 

One scene that stays with me: the very end of *Vertigo*, when Scotty (James Stewart) stands on the ledge of the bell tower and looks down to where Judy (formerly Madeleine) has fallen to her death. I have often thought he might just as well jump after her because his life is completely over now (having lost her twice at this point - and having completely lost his grip after the first time). It doesn?t matter at all that he overcame his vertigo. I also find the ending of *Notorious* memorable when, after much suspense and torment, Cary Grant finally extracts Ingrid Bergman from a South American Nazi enclave, slams the car door on Claude Rains and drives off with his wife. Rains then has to face his Nazi cohorts who now know something is up ? and, as we know, it?s surely the end of him.

 

Speaking of Claude Rains (and *Casablanca*, mentioned in first post here) there's the famous last scene with Bogart as they walk away on the wet tarmac: "Louis, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship..." Perfection.

 

and so many more...

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