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Hello my dear fellow TCMers,

I know what I am about to tell you is going to sound like I am off my rocker. I assure you that I am not. My mother and I love TCM.  However my mother is losing her eye sight. So I did an experiment to see if she would still be able to enjoy TCM with me.  I turned off all lights every thing but the t.v. turned on the SAP on the t.v and slid on a sleep mask. Settled in a comfy. Spot and began to watch the Women. ( my favorite Rosalind Russell film). It was such and uplifting and unique experience. It was as if I was watching it for the first time. The music is wonderful,the dialogue and language oh my, and the sap descriptive does such a wonderful job. You felt like you were in a giant dark theatre. At the end of the movie I sat and cried, not because of the movie but because I know that my mom and I have many more years watching TCM together. 

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That's a great story. About a month ago, I saw an eyesight-impaired customer getting set up with his own earpiece that would provide SAP description for them in the theater. He wasn't totally blind, because a very famous local celebrity came in the theater at the same time, and his friend pointed the celebrity out to him, and he turned his head to look. It's wonderful technology can help people continue to enjoy films! My dad, in his mid-80s, is struggling to read print, and I'm not sure what we're going to be able to do about that. My mom has discovered a sort of magnifying table where you can put a book under a special glass, but it would require sitting up straight and keeping the book under the glass. I just don't think my dad is going to adjust to that. His whole life, he's liked to have his easy chair leaning back in the farthest position it will go while reading, and I seriously doubt he's going to change his behavior at 85, even if it means it would help him read. He's quite stubborn. But I don't know. He would never go buy such a thing himself, but if I just bought it, and was it there in the house, he might give it a try. So, I'm considering doing that for his birthday in September.

What is a sleep mask?

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4 hours ago, Shannon6573 said:

Hello my dear fellow TCMers,

I know what I am about to tell you is going to sound like I am off my rocker. I assure you that I am not. My mother and I love TCM.  However my mother is losing her eye sight. So I did an experiment to see if she would still be able to enjoy TCM with me.  I turned off all lights every thing but the t.v. turned on the SAP on the t.v and slid on a sleep mask. Settled in a comfy. Spot and began to watch the Women. ( my favorite Rosalind Russell film). It was such and uplifting and unique experience. It was as if I was watching it for the first time. The music is wonderful,the dialogue and language oh my, and the sap descriptive does such a wonderful job. You felt like you were in a giant dark theatre. At the end of the movie I sat and cried, not because of the movie but because I know that my mom and I have many more years watching TCM together. 

TCM is one of the few to have movies with DVS (Descriptive Video Service). It began with PBS, naturally. Ray was one of the first commercial movies I remember to have DVS on the DVD.

While I would be terrified to loose my sight, I've been in the company of many a blind person.

Classic movies, just like older TV shows, are more dialog driven.

Very nice story. Thank You!

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1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

What is a sleep mask?

I believe sleep masks are those things that you see people wear over their eyes.  Kind of like Audrey Hepburn's mask with the eyelashes that she wears in Breakfast at Tiffanys

0ff2a348-e67d-4386-a61a-88fb37c4aa99-batscreen055.jpg

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I believe sleep masks are those things that you see people wear over their eyes.  Kind of like Audrey Hepburn's mask with the eyelashes that she wears in Breakfast at Tiffanys

0ff2a348-e67d-4386-a61a-88fb37c4aa99-batscreen055.jpg

Such a beautiful sleep mask. If she were still alive, I'd be asking, "If I feed her, can I keep her?"

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On 7/30/2018 at 6:25 AM, sewhite2000 said:

is struggling to read print

Thanks for that story. Is the machine you're referring to a CC-TV? The platform where the book is placed swivels and the you look directly ahead of you at a monitor where the typeface is, having the ability to make the print different sizes (including quite large). They are wonderful machines but are devilishly expensive, about 6K, but they can be bought used. It would probably still require sitting upright although some creativity in situating the machine to the comfortable chair may be possible, but it could be awkward. I believe this machine I'm describing is the absolute State of the Art "reading machine" for the visually impaired.

What you describe doesn't sound like this, though. I would be interested in knowing more about it. Is there a standard nomenclature for the item that your mother found? What is the strength of magnification? Anything you might tell me would be appreciated.

I am severely visually impaired in one eye and my other has very good distance viewing but cannot discern print clearly for any length of time. I get a brilliantly clear image of the type at the outset but it depreciates within a half hour. I do best with a 3x magnifier (with or without glasses) where I can have a reasonably long sitting. I can sit back but the necessity of holding the magnifier means that I have to hold the book with one hand which gets awkward and tiresome.

The Braille Institute, a non-profit organization, is located in the Southern California, but there might be similar organizations elsewhere in the country. I am not suggesting your father learn Braille. Braille Institute provides innumerable helps for the vision impaired, including an ingenious audio-book player that is easy to use with wonderful navigational tools. You can play anything from an external hardrive to a simple thumb drive. There are custom made cartridges with books on it that can plug into the machine.

I find that eye washes that you get from the drug store, artificial tears as well might help. Has your father seen an eye doctor? I understand that there are actual eye-drop medications though I haven't used those yet but may in the future.

I certainly wish the best for your father. I think I understand what he is going through. I would be grateful to know anything you learn about this and do feel free to PM me. Thanks.

 

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9 minutes ago, laffite said:

Thanks for that story. Is the machine you're referring to a CC-TV? The platform where the book is placed swivels and the you look directly ahead of you at a monitor where the typeface is, having the ability to make the print different sizes (including quite large). They are wonderful machines but are devilishly expensive, about 6K, but they can be bought used. It would probably still require sitting upright although some creativity in situating the machine to the comfortable chair may be possible, but it could be awkward. I believe this machine I'm describing is the absolute State of the Art "reading machine" for the visually impaired.

What you describe doesn't sound like this, though. I would be interested in knowing more about it. Is there a standard nomenclature for the item that your mother found? What is the strength of magnification? Anything you might tell me would be appreciated.

I am severely visually impaired in one eye and my other has very good distance viewing but cannot discern print clearly for any length of time. I get a brilliantly clear image of the type at the outset but it depreciates within a half hour. I do best with a 3x magnifier (with or without glasses) where I can have a reasonably long sitting. I can sit back but the necessity of holding the magnifier means that I have to hold the book with one hand which gets awkward and tiresome.

The Braille Institute, a non-profit organization, is located in the Southern California, but there might be similar organizations elsewhere in the country. I am not suggesting your father learn Braille. Braille Institute provides innumerable helps for the vision impaired, including an ingenious audio-book player that is easy to use with wonderful navigational tools. You can play anything from an external hardrive to a simple thumb drive. There are custom made cartridges with books on it that can plug into the machine.

I find that eye washes that you get from the drug store, artificial tears as well might help. Has your father seen an eye doctor? I understand that there are actual eye-drop medications though I haven't used those yet but may in the future.

I certainly wish the best for your father. I think I understand what he is going through. I would be grateful to know anything you learn about this and do feel free to PM me. Thanks.

 

I don't read much, so the magnification device I have is gathering dust. It goes around my head and can be adjusted for head size. Similar to what a jeweler would use. Has a battery powered lamp and interchangeable sets of magnification, which fold up out of the way when not in use.

I did a search just now, not finding what I have exactly, but many types of nice 'headband magnifiers.' I too would agree Braille is hard. The older your fingers get, the less likely they are to be sensitive to Braille. I live near a blind center. Was evaluated there. I can suggest looking for a blind center for advice, The American Council For The Blind or The National Federation Of The Blind, etc. Many will deal with low vision, in addition to various levels of blindness.

The Daisy MP3 player for the blind is a bit expensive.

Here is one company that can help:

https://www.maxiaids.com/

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For many years, I had TCM running on the TV in the next room from my workshop (to keep it clean & dust free) and would just listen to movies as I worked. It was great, I could listen to about 3-5 movies per day and still be making money. Just listening, you could discern what actors used their voice in their acting and who's performance was flat.

Obviously this didn't work when TCM would show silents or subtitled foreign films. I'd just listen to the radio on those days. I never thought about using the SAP function!

But I agree, listening to movies is great fun!
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On 7/30/2018 at 1:41 PM, Shannon6573 said:

Yes a sleep mask is like t in the movie breakfast at Tiffanys. Got mine at Wal-Mart and it is silk and very comfortable to wear.

I wonder....

Do you slip it on during the "Mystery Guest" segment on old "What's My Line" reruns?  ;)

Anyway.....

one night back in the early '70's, at a friend's place, we sat in the next room and listened to a movie playing on the tube in his living room.  Something he got in the habit of doing in order to pay stricter attention to the MUSIC SCORES in them( especially many of the old '30's and '40's horror flicks).  It's usually what I credit MY paying more attention to the scores, and WHILE watching the movies too.

Anyway too.....In the late '60's and early '70's, I had a friend who was blind at birth.  He was cheerfully resigned to it and could often poke a bit of fun about it, as one day I called him about something, and asked what he was doing.  He said he was watching TV.  I figured he could follow the story by recognizing sounds and listening to the dialog, but when I asked what he was "watching", he replied, "Pink Panther cartoons."  ! :D !  He and his brother used to get into "fights" by:

1. Him pulling the main fuse to the house's electrical box, and

2. His brother by re-arranging the furniture.  ;)

Sepiatone

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