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NORTH BY NORTHWEST ... Cary Grant's best??


GeorgeBailey1951

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I think it's definitely one of his best movies. Of course, he was in a lot of great movies, from the screwball comedies of the 30's to some pretty old-fashioned stuff in the early and mid-60s.

 

But I'd bet a lot of fans remember him mostly for "North by Northwest", "An Affair to Remember",

"That Touch of Mink" and "Bringing Up Baby".

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North by Northwest was his best film. I liked most of his films even Father Goose, which was fun.

But the girls (And I mean any one under 35) at work look at me funny when they are giggling over Brad Pitt, and I say he ain't no Cary Grant...Yup Mr. Grant is my benchmark for a suave, good looking, talented actor, and the only one who ever halfway measured up was a little known fellow named Archie Leech.

Q.R.

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It is too hard a choice for me to make to narrow down his best performance. And I would still love him even if they wouldn't have changed his name. I wonder if anybody feels the same? A circus performer named Archibald Leech the best looking man of all time in my book. Who would have thought it?

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North By Northwest was the first Cary Grant film I ever saw in a theater, and I've never forgotten the movie or the experience. Up until then, I'd just seen things like Monkey Business and Arsenic And Old Lace on TV. This still seems like the ultimate to me, though I'd say To Catch A Thief comes pretty close. My reaction to Cary is influenced greatly by his costar and, though I like Eva Marie Saint, I think Deborah Kerr and Ingrid Bergman brought more out of him. An Affair To Remember and Indiscreet, both from this same era, are strong contenders. I also admire his work in The Grass Is Greener, though the film itself is weaker than these others. Bottom line...Yeah. North By Northwest.

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Cary Grant is one of my ALL-TIME favorite actors but NORTH BY NORTHWEST is not a fave. My favorite performance is his dark, brooding, vulnerable, sexy, atypical "Devlin" in NOTORIOUS. There's something interesting going on here that continues to fascinates me.

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Cary Grant is one of the all-time great actors.

 

In my humble opinion he made at least twenty very good films that have withstood the test of time.

 

The Awful Truth 1937

Bringing Up Baby 1938

Gunga Din 1939

Only Angels Have Wings 1939

His Girl Friday 1940

My Favorite Wife 1940

The Philadelphia Story 1940

Suspicion 1941

The Talk of the Town 1942

Destination Tokyo 1943

Arsenic and Old Lace 1944

Notorious 1946

The Bishop's Wife 1947

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House 1948

To Catch a Thief 1955

An Affair to Remember 1957

The Pride and the Passion 1957

North By Northwest 1959

The Grass is Greener 1960

Charade 1963

 

His top five I think are the following:

 

1. North By Northwest 1959

2. My Favorite Wife 1940

3. The Awful Truth 1937

4. The Talk of the Town 1942

5. Destination Tokyo 1943

 

 

And I think the real reason he never won an Oscar out right was because of the fact that he set out to make movies himself, by creating his own production company. He was viewed as an independent, and in many ways this hurt his chances at winning an Oscar.

 

Also, of all of his films, he seemed to be the most successful at comedies. And as we all know, the Academy really hardly ever hands out statuettes for comedic performances.

 

He was a genius at his movie craft. In many of his films, he does not even look like he is acting. One of my favorites.

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Excellent list! I would put "The Awful Truth" at #1 because of the added significance that it was the movie that really made Grant a star. Incidentally, the five or so minute portion of this movie which partly involved playing "hide the hat" with the dog is the funniest movie segment of all time, in my humble opinion.

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My list of Grant's best:

Bringing Up Baby 1938

Holiday 1938 - This is one of my favorites - he and Hepburn are Great!

In Name Only 1939

Gunga Din 1939

His Girl Friday 1940 - The pace he and Russell pull off here is classic.

My Favorite Wife 1940 - His elevator scene is classic

The Philadelphia Story 1940

Penny Serenade 1941 - The scene before the judge may be one of his best ever.

Suspicion 1941

The Talk of the Town 1942

Arsenic and Old Lace 1944 - This is like watch him on stage

Notorious 1946

Bachelor and the Bobby-soxer 1947 - This was one of the classics my wife wanted me to watch

that got hooked into the "old black and white movies"

The Bishop's Wife 1947

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House 1948

People Will Talk 1951

Room for One More 1952 - This is what family is about - he played a great dad

Monkey Business 1952 - This one worked it's way into my list over the years - plain fun

An Affair to Remember 1957

Indiscreet 1958

North By Northwest 1959 - A blonde, a train and Grant

The Grass is Greener 1960

That Touch of Mink 1962

Charade 1963

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if not the best,close to it since CG brings so many different emotions to the scenes.No to mention that any movie where we get to see him w/his shirt off is ok by me!!!

I also loved the Bachelor & the Bobby Soxer just because he was so funny when he tried to use the teen slang,etc..He just had so much talent & could do so many different roles,unlike the stars today..

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With the 50th anniversary edition DVD and blu-ray out tomorrow, there's an interesting article in today's L.A. Times:

 

*'North by Northwest' still full of thrills and chills*

The Hitchcock film keeps viewers on the edge 50 years on. The AFI Fest is having a screening, and a DVD will be released.

 

By Susan King

 

November 2, 2009

 

Who can forget those images -- Cary Grant on a deserted highway being chased by a crop dusting plane? Grant and Eva Marie Saint scampering over the president's noses on Mt. Rushmore as they are pursued by a group of nefarious spies?

 

Then there's the pulsating score by Bernard Herrmann, one of the great screen composer's most evocative works.

 

In fact, Alfred Hitchcock's romantic thriller "North by Northwest" is so viscerally entertaining, it's hard to believe the classic is celebrating its 50th anniversary.

 

The AFI Fest and Warner Home Video are marking this anniversary with a screening tonight of a newly remastered digital print made from original VistaVision elements at the Mann Chinese Theatre I with stars Saint and Martin Landau on hand. On Tuesday, Warner Home Video is releasing a 50th-anniversary edition of the film on Blu-ray and DVD.

 

(Before the screening of "North by Northwest," there will be a screening of the documentary "Something's Gonna Live," which examines such veteran production designers as 100-year-old Robert Boyle, who designed the Hitchcock masterwork.).

 

Saint and Landau

 

Penned by Ernest Lehman, "North by Northwest" stars Grant as a "Mad Men" type (even Don Draper didn't look that good in a suit) who is mistaken for an international spy. He finds himself being chased by some truly bad guys (played by James Mason and Landau) and the authorities, who believe he committed a murder. Saint is on hand as the cool blond love interest.

 

Saint had just given birth to a daughter when she received the script to "North by Northwest." An Oscar winner for 1954's "On the Waterfront," she recalls that when she read the script she was a bit surprised that her character didn't make her entrance until after Grant's, Mason's and Landau's. But her husband changed her mind. "He read it and said it's a wonderful script."

 

"Little did I know," Saint says, laughing.

 

Landau, who won an Oscar playing Bela Lugosi in 1994's "Ed Wood," appeared in "North by Northwest" as the henchman Leonard.

 

Hitchcock had caught him on opening night in Los Angeles in Paddy Chayefsky's play "Middle of the Night," in which he played a macho musician.

 

Hitchcock, perfectionist

 

"The next thing I knew I got a call saying Mr. Hitchcock wanted to meet with me at MGM," Landau says. "He greeted me nicely and took me on a tour of several offices because he had all the storyboards on the walls."

 

The actor was surprised he chose him to play Leonard.

 

"That character in the play was 180 degrees from the character of Leonard. He said, 'Marty, you have a circus going on inside of you. If you can play that part in the theater you can do this little trinket.' I remember he called it a 'trinket,' which was an odd choice of words."

 

Landau says that he chose to play Leonard as a homosexual "because he wanted to get rid of Eva Marie with such a vengeance," he says.

 

"Ernest Lehman actually added a line after he saw some of the dailies which was kind of a brave line in 1958 when we shot it -- my character says, 'call it my woman's intuition.' "

 

Though Hitchcock was quoted as saying directors should treat actors like cattle, Saint and Landau say that wasn't true.

 

"He was so dear," says Saint. "When I was in my black dress with the red embossed roses for a scene, I was getting coffee in a Styrofoam cup. He said, 'I can't have my leading lady drinking from a Styrofoam cup. Get her coffee in a china cup and a saucer."

 

But Hitchcock did live up to his reputation as a perfectionist. "The dresses, the jewels, every hair on my head he examined before he did the scene."

 

Landau recalls that Hitchcock never gave him any direction.

 

"If anything, I felt a little left out because he would whisper stuff to Cary or James or Eva Marie. I would say, 'Is there anything you want to tell me?' and he said, 'Martin, I will only tell you if I don't like what you are doing.' Then he would walk away."

 

For information on the screening to go www.afifest.bside.com.

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Just got my copy of the 50th Anniversary DVD of North by Northwest a day before the release date from Amazon.com and even though I have not seen the whole movie I checked out some of it. I am astonished how good this looks compared to the original DVD that ironically was remastered by Lowry back in 2000 but Warner's $1 million remaster blows that one out of the water. I thought the 2000 DVD looked good but this DVD has a film look to it compared to a somewhat digital look of the old DVD and its apparent that the old DVD was too light. For example, the opening titles in the 2000 DVD had an almost turquoise color for the background but on the new DVD its more green and the transition from the MGM logo to the main titles looks different since the dissolve lingers in white a little bit longer than the old DVD which looks better than the old DVD to my eyes. Anyone who is a fan of this movie must buy this DVD for the video quality itself plus I got it off Amazon.com for $12.49 with free 2-day shipping with the free trial of prime membership. I would assume the Blu-ray looks even better. I would be happy to answer any questions that people may have about the new DVD.

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> {quote:title=JoeBond wrote:}{quote}

> I would assume the Blu-ray looks even better. I would be happy to answer any questions that people may have about the new DVD.

 

I ordered the blu-ray version and should be getting it soon - although I've seen some screencaps elsewhere and it looked very impressive. Most likely, I'll save this one for the weekend - it really is going to be a special treat for me.

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Another great review for the 50th Anniversary edition, this time from Leonard Maltin:

 

*NORTH BY NORTHWEST* (Warner Home Video) ? Funny, I thought the last DVD release of this Alfred Hitchcock gem was definitive, with an excellent hour-long documentary hosted by its leading lady, Eva Marie Saint, and a commentary track by its articulate screenwriter, Ernest Lehman. How lucky for us that Warner Home Video decided that the movie?s 50th anniversary warranted the investment of returning to the VistaVision Technicolor master elements (which hadn?t been touched for years) to create a new high-definition copy. Until you see it with your own eyes you might not believe the difference, but this transfer is incredibly sharp and rich, with colors that pop off the screen.

 

As for bonus features, producer-director Gary Leva has created two new documentaries in which five contemporary filmmakers discuss North by Northwest: screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie (The Usual Suspects) and directors Francis Lawrence (I Am Legend), William Friedkin (The French Connection, The Exorcist), Curtis Hanson (L.A. Confidential, In Her Shoes) and Guillermo Del Toro (Hellboy, Pan?s Labyrinth). Knowing how passionate and eloquent they are about the filmmaking process, I expected to enjoy the remarks of Hanson, Del Toro, and Friedkin, and I did; they are world-class cin?astes who really know their stuff. I was pleasantly surprised by McQuarrie and Lawrence, whose work I must admit I don?t admire quite as much; they have grown in my estimation because they contribute such cogent and original thoughts about Hitchcock and his mastery of storytelling. It?s a pleasure to listen to all five men expound about the director and North by Northwest in particular, and the two pieces don?t really overlap.

 

I?m not crazy about the prospect of continually replacing DVDs I already own, but Warner has made it worth our while for this terrific film.

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