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Kid Dabb

Good Story For Movie?

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Unusual stories appear in the news all the time. Some would seem to be good material for a movie. How many great movies have originated with short stories or news articles? I know I've seen more than a few movies on TCM where the credits refer to a 'short story from Reader's Digest' and remember thinking, Wow. All that from just a few pages.

 

I thought I'd start this thread to post short articles or links to interesting stories along these lines.

In today's world, this one would seem to strike close to home for more than a few. With some really good writing to flesh it out, I think this story would make a pretty good film:

 

http://tech.yahoo.com/news/ap/20090314/ap_on_hi_te/tec_death_online

 

P.S. I'm not spamming for the companies mentioned in the article. I have no interest.

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That no foul play was suspected makes it a very sad story. A woman lost within her own house and life. Perhaps M. Night Shyamalan could adapt this for Nicole Kidman or Sharon Stone (with no disrespect toward the elderly woman in the article).

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That was an interesting story, Kid. I don't know if anyone in the forum has ever played in an MMORPG, but it's amazing how much you can grow to care for your online friends.

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I know! So sad that the poor old woman lived there like that all those years without anyone noticing. I picture her talking to her siblings everyday as if they were still a real part of her life. What also stuck me, it was their original family home and I imagine either none of them married or some did and came back. I just want to know more. The only thing I did hear, the old woman was under observation, but I don't know if she was released and allowed to go back home, that is if she was found to be of sound mind and able to get along alone at her advanced age.

 

I picture a movie starting out with her as a little girl playing with her siblings. It also makes me wonder what kind of life they had growing up. Was it a nice up bringing, filled with joy and love, or a horrible abusive environment that gave these siblings such a strong bond that not even death could seperate them?

 

If no one makes a movie, I'd be happy just to hear how it all turned out for the old lady. I so want a happy ending for her. :-)

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Oops, excuse me. I forgot to say, yeah, I like the article you posted for a movie. Too bad there isn't anyone here to take suggestions any further than this board. lol

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One memoir I've read three times is The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls. To say Jeannette had a harrowing upbringing is a vast understatement and she tells her story without a trace of self-pity. It was such a huge best-seller I imagine some of you have read it. It would make a movie to remember.

 

Also, I have a thing for true crime books. Ann Rule's books have already been made into tv movies, not all but some, e.g., Small Sacrifices with Farrah Fawcett. All Ann's stories are compelling and worth being on film.

 

Wambaugh is great of course. I'd like to see Fire Lover made into a movie. The story has been spotlighted on TruTV and other venues.

 

One more - Intensive Care by Echo Heron. If you haven't read any of Echo's books do so, you won't be disappointed. Her first book Intensive Care is abt becoming a nurse. She is such a compelling writer who can't make you LOL and cry on the same page...

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If you are appealing to established writer's, those are some nice suggestions. Since I started this move toward screen writing, friends and family have made suggestions for a script. First question I ask myself: "Is it in the public domain?" I will be starting shortly on an adaptation for my portfolio. I am sticking with the 19th Century. Long dead authors.

 

Good story for a movie? I'm keeping mum, for now...

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I noticed in Robert Osborne's intro to The Quiet Man earlier he mentioned it was developed from a short story in The Saturday Evening Post back in the 1930's - John Ford had been wanting to make the movie since he read it almost 20 years prior to it's production. I think it was worth the wait.

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I've long wished they'd make movies based on the stories by Patrick McManus.

 

Who could resist films with titles like: *A Fine and Pleasant Misery* or *Never Sniff A Gift Fish* ?

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I would like to write a true crime book but am not a writer. I have to disagree with you on Ann Rule. I'd like to think her heart is in the right place but there's something that bothers me about her that I can't quite put my finger on.

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I'm sure the spiraling economic times of today will spawn some form(s) of theatrical products. Nothing comparable to the depression era movies we cherish here I'm sure. You never know. Many of our classic favorites weren't exactly chart toppers in their day either. This new era we're about to embark upon may contain within it both the closing end of one completed circle, and the begining thread of a new one in the history of humankind as well as film.

-----------------------------

 

Bad Economy Means Good Hollywood Movies - October 29, 2008

 

The LA Times reports on the correlation between bad US economies and good, if nihilistic, Hollywood movies:

 

Great Hollywood movies and total economic collapse have a long and symbiotic history. The films of the 1930s were just as notable?for reflecting the panic, anger, disillusionment and despair brought on by the financial collapse as they were for providing an escape. When good times give way suddenly to bad (or, in this case, when bad times give way suddenly to worse), fashion, materialism and excess suddenly become suspect. The arts revert temporarily (until there?s money to be made again) to the starving, the angry and the ugly.

 

More and more movies seem to embody the cynicism of the times. Driving by my local mini-multiplex last weekend I noticed a trifecta of disaffection: W+, Religulous and Burn After Reading+ were playing side-by-side, and it occurred to me that this lineup would not have been thinkable even as recently as 2006.

 

Might as well add The Changeling and Pride & Glory to the dour category. Then, there?s a category that can best be described as the opposite of dour, embodied by movie titles like Zach & Miri Make a Porno.

 

But?when do the movies get good? If the LA Times reporter is right, Hollywood movies are a lagging cultural indicator. We might just be at a moral low right now. If depth of anguish has an inverse correlation with quality of movies, the best movies might be in production as we speak.

 

I quite look forward to the inevitable Wall Street collapse docu-drama.

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I always thought the story of [bobbie, the Wonder Dog|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobbie,_the_Wonder_Dog] would make a nice, heart-warming family movie.

 

Then there's also the stories of war dog [sergeant Stubby|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergeant_Stubby].

 

Message was edited by: edonline

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maybe some of these pirate attacks off the horn of Africa might make a compelling movie.

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> {quote:title=snerd wrote:}{quote}

> maybe some of these pirate attacks off the horn of Africa might make a compelling movie.

 

I was thinking the same. Something like Green Dolphin Street with the pirate business going on as a background story.

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I'm watching Dr. Gillespie's New Assistant (1942) and got curious about the actress playing Mrs. Howard Allwinn Young (also known as Claire Merton). Susan Peters. Her TCM Biography is tragic. Definitely good material for a movie.

 

SUSAN PETERS

AKA: Suzanne Carnahan;

 

Born: 1921-07-03

Birth place: Spokane, Washington

Death: 1952-10-23

Death cause: complications from a spinal injury

Nationality: American

Profession: actor

 

Biography

 

A lovely and talented young leading lady of the 1940s, Susan Peters fell prey to tragedy just as her career as one of MGM's bright young stars was rising. She began in films in 1940, initially using her real name, Suzanne Carnahan; she can be spotted in small parts in films including "Susan and God" (1940) and "Meet John Doe" (1941). 1942 marked a breakthrough for the wistful brunette with the small face and gentle manner. She made a good impression in MGM's Dr. Kildare series as leading lady to rising heartthrob Van Johnson in "Dr. Gillespie's New Assistant" (1942). Peters registered especially strongly in "Random Harvest" (1942), toplining Ronald Colman as a wartime amnesiac and Greer Garson as a woman he meets while in said condition. As a member of Colman's family who falls in love with him once he has remembered his past but now forgotten Garson, Peters had a particularly moving scene in which she gives him up, realizing that something stands between them. The film was one of the year's biggest hits, and Peters justly snagged a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination.

Peters' star continued to rise in 1943 as she was cast opposite Robert Taylor in the glossy love story "Song of Russia". Although "Young Ideas" (also 1943) was strictly routine family comedy, she did receive top billing. In 1944, MGM confirmed its faith in Peters by promoting her from "featured player" to the ranks of "star", but sadly she would not enjoy that status for long. A hunting accident severely injured her spine, and the 23 year-old actress was confined to a wheelchair for the rest of her short life.

 

Peters had completed work on an insipid tale of three WACs, "Keep Your Powder Dry", co-starring her with Lana Turner and Laraine Day and released in 1945. But her recovery was long, painful and partial. Her 1943 marriage to actor (and later director) Richard Quine ended in 1948, but Peters did bravely resume her career. She returned to films once for "Sign of the Ram" (1948), an earnest and well-acted story of a wheelchair-bound mother who uses her disability to control and hamper her family. Other roles, however, were not forthcoming. A physically challenged actor like Lionel Barrymore could still play prominent roles in films because of his age, his crotchety character parts and because his gradual physical decline meant that MGM did not play up his wheelchair-bound status. Audiences knew too much of Peters' plight, however, and studios felt that fans would feel too much pain watching her. Peters gamely continued, however, acting for almost a year on TV in a 15-minute NBC drama, "Miss Susan" (1951), as a crippled attorney in mini-courtroom sagas. Soon thereafter, though, Peters passed away at age 31, her career short-circuited by the cruelties of fate.

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Ok. Maybe we can bring back Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck to make a 111 min b&w movie based on this premise. Humphrey Bogart too. He could be wearing his hat in character as Fred C. Dobbs as the line chef bumming 2-bits from everyone who gets near him.

 

 

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*Oregon babies switched at birth meet 56 years later*

 

Information from The Oregonian -

 

AP ? Kay Rene Qualls of Heppner, Ore., and DeeAnn Shafer, of Richland, Wash.Tue May 12, 6:17 am ET

 

HEPPNER, Ore. ? On a spring day in 1953, two baby girls were born at Pioneer Memorial Hospital in eastern Oregon. They grew up happily, got married, had kids of their own and became grandparents. Then last summer their lives were turned upside down.

 

Kay Rene Reed Qualls found out that she and DeeAnn Angell Shafer were switched at birth.

 

They recently met for the first time and underwent DNA tests after a woman who knew both their mothers called Qualls' brother with her suspicion.

 

Qualls' brother, Bobby Reed, said the 86-year-old woman knew his mother and had also lived next door to the Angell family.

 

"She said she had something she had to get off her chest," he told the East Oregonian newspaper in a story published Monday.

 

The woman, whom he declined to identify by name, told him that his mother, Marjorie Angell, had insisted back in 1953 she had been given the wrong baby after the nurses returned from bathing the two newborns, but her concerns were brushed off.

 

The woman showed Bobby Reed a photo.

 

"It looked like Kay Rene in about 7th or 8th grade," he said.

 

But it wasn't. It was DeeAnn Shafer's sister.

 

"Kay Rene is not a Reed," the woman insisted. "DeeAnn is a Reed."

 

Bobby Reed was stunned, learning later that rumors of a mix-up had been around for years. In early February, Shafer learned the truth in a telephone call from her sister, Juanita.

 

"Do you remember those rumors of being switched at birth?" she asked, and went on to provide the update.

 

"Does this mean I'm not invited to the family reunion?" Shafer joked.

 

Qualls, Bobby Reed and one of their sisters met Shafer at a Kennewick, Wash., clinic last month for DNA testing. A week later, Qualls got the results, learning her likely probability of being related to her brother and sister was zero.

 

"I cried," she said. "I wanted to be a Reed ? my life wasn't my life."

 

Shafer's DNA report said she had 99.9 percent of being related to Bobby and Dorothy Reed. Now living in Richland, Wash., Shafer said the report only confirmed what she knew after meeting Qualls.

 

"After seeing Kay Rene, I went home and told my husband, I don't know why she's doing the DNA testing," she said. "I was shocked ? she looked just like my sister's twin."

 

Pioneer Memorial Hospital offered to pay for counseling, but both women declined.

 

The two have become friends and celebrated their May 3 birthday together. Recently, Qualls introduced Shafer to her work colleagues, calling her "my swister."

 

"I'm trying to move forward at look at the positive," Shafer said. "You can't look back. It just drives you crazy."

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*If you're in the desert southwest and suddenly come upon THEM!, do not fear. Once again, the scientists have come to your rescue.*

 

*Headline: PARASITIC FLIES TURN FIRE ANTS INTO ZOMBIES!*

 

Fort Worth Star-Telegram Bill Hanna, Fort Worth Star-telegram ? Tue May 12, 2:09 pm ET

 

It sounds like something out of science fiction: zombie fire ants. But it's all too real.

 

Fire ants wander aimlessly away from the mound. Eventually their heads fall off, and they die.

The strange part is that researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M's AgriLife Extension Service say making "zombies" out of fire ants is a good thing.

 

"It's a tool ? they're not going to completely wipe out the fire ant, but it's a way to control their population," said Scott Ludwig , an integrated pest management specialist with the AgriLife Extension Service in Overton , in East Texas . The tool is the tiny phorid fly, native to a region of South America where the fire ants in Texas originated. Researchers have learned that there are as many as 23 phorid species along with pathogens that attack fire ants to keep their population and movements under control.

 

So far, four phorid species have been introduced in Texas. The flies "dive-bomb" the fire ants and lay eggs. The maggot that hatches inside the ant eats away at the brain, and the ant starts exhibiting what some might say is zombie-like behavior. "At some point, the ant gets up and starts wandering," said Rob Plowes, a research associate at UT.

 

The maggot eventually migrates into the ant's head, but Plowes said he "wouldn't use the word 'control' to describe what is happening. There is no brain left in the ant, and the ant just starts wandering aimlessly. This wandering stage goes on for about two weeks." About a month after the egg is laid, the ant's head falls off and the fly emerges ready to attack any foraging ants away from the mound and lay eggs.

 

Plowes said fire ants are "very aware" of these tiny flies, and it only takes a few to cause the ants to modify their behavior. "Just one or two flies can control movement or above-ground activity," Plowes said. "It's kind of like a medieval activity where you're putting a castle under siege."

 

Researchers began introducing phorid species in Texas in 1999. The first species has traveled all the way from Central and South Texas to the Oklahoma border. This year, UT researchers will add colonies south of the Metroplex at farms and ranches from Stephenville to Overton . It is the fourth species introduced in Texas .

 

Fire ants cost the Texas economy about $1 billion annually by damaging circuit breakers and other electrical equipment, according to a Texas A&M study. They can also threaten young calves.

 

Determining whether the phorid flies will work in Texas will take time, perhaps as long as a decade.

 

"These are very slow acting," Plowes said. "It's more like a cumulative impact measured across a time frame of years. It's not an immediate silver bullet impact."

 

The flies, which are USDA -approved, do not attack native ants or species and have been introduced in other Gulf Coast states, Plowes said. Despite initial concerns, farmers and ranchers have been willing to let researchers use their property to establish colonies. At the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association in Fort Worth in March, Plowes said they found plenty of volunteers.

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