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Thank you for starting this discussion :)

 

It has been a while since I've seen it, and perhaps I'll have a bit more to add after watching it again this afternoon, but to me, SHANE represents first and foremost the importance of good and decent folks to work together and stand up to the bullies and villains who would want to throw them off their homes and destroy their honest way of lives through underhanded means and unrelenting menace. This is why the most important lesson in the movie is to STAND UP to the evil and stare it in the face and not be scared of it, like some of the townspeople were.

 

When you look at the evil ones (like the one that _Jack Palance_ played) and let them know that you're not scared of them and that you're going to go on about your business and not be intimidated, then you are asserting yourself and standing up for the values of your community. The good guys need to stand up to the bad ones and put up the good fight, until there are no bad ones left and people can go on with their peaceful, fruitful way of life and enjoy all that is good in a community of upstanding citizens.

 

And it is important to remember that in the end, GOOD will prevail over EVIL, and that those who would seek to destroy the community will be driven away until they are no more.

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One of the many great things about "Shane" is the excellent music score by Victor Young.

For anyone who would like to follow along later today when TCM shows the movie, and learn the titles to all the tunes in the score, here's a complete listing of all the selections:

 

1. Shane Prelude (Main titles)

consisting of

a. The Call of the Far-Away Hills (Victor Young, Mack David)

b. The Quilting Party (James Fletcher and Francis Key, arranged by Victor Young)

2. The Rykers (Victor Young)

3. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

4. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

5. Friendship Begins (Victor Young)

6. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

7. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

8. Starett's Plan (Victor Young)

9. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

10. Eyes of Blue ( Victor Young, Wilson Stone)

11. Eyes of Blue

12. Eyes of Blue

13. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

14. The Tree Stump (Victor Young)

15. Pastoral (Victor Young)

16. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

17. Off to Town

consisting of The Call of Far-Away Hills

18. Grafton's Store (Part 1) (Victor Young)

19. Grafton's Store (Part 2) (Victor Young)

20. Beautiful Dreamer (S. C. Foster)

21. Marching Through Georgia (H. C. Work)

22. Beautiful Dreamer

23. Dixie (D. D. Emmet)

24. Beautiful Dreamer

25. Wyoming Sketches (Victor Young)

26. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

27. Eyes of Blue

28. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

29. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

30. Approach to Danger (Victor Young)

31. Music Box

consisting of Surprise Symphony (Joseph Haydn, arranged by Victor Young)

32. End of Fight (Victor Young)

33. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

34. Victory and Trouble (Victor Young)

35. Heroic Death (Victor Young)

36. Tender Moments

consisting of

a. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

b. Eyes of Blue

37. Wilson (Victor Young)

38. Ride and Memories (Victor Young)

39. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

40. Eyes of Blue

41. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

42. The Fourth of July (Victor Young)

43. Dixie (D. D. Emmet, arranged by Victor Young)

44. Dixie

45. A Tough Torrey (Victor Young)

46. Oxford Minuet (Traditional, arranged by Phil Boutelje)

47. Marching Through Georgia

48. Abide With Me (W. H. Monk)

49. Wedding March (R. Wagner)

50. Varsovienne (Traditional, arranged by Phil Boutelje)

51. Goodbye Old Paint (Traditional, arranged by Phil Boutelje)

52. After the Dance (Victor Young)

53. Eyes of Blue

54. Trouble Ahead (Victor Young)

55. Dixie

56. Trouble Ahead

57. Dixie

58. Dixie

59. Torrey's Death (Victor Young)

60. Dixie

61. Torrey's Death

62. Dixie

63. Torrey's Death

64. Torrey's Death

65. Taking Torrey Home (Victor Young)

66. Dixie

67. Dixie

68. Dixie

69. Abide With Me

70. Dixie

71. Taps (Traditional)

72. Cemetery Hill (Victor Young)

73. Black is the Color (Traditional, arranged by Victor Young)

74. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

75. The Plan Begins ( Victor Young)

76. Peace Party (Victor Young)

77. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

78. A New Calloway (Victor Young)

79. Cemetery Hill

consisting of

a. Black is the Color

b. A New Calloway

80. Man and Wife (Victor Young)

81. Black is the Color

82. Black is the Color

83. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

84. Sad is the Parting (Victor Young)

85. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

86. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

87. Varsovienne

88. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

89. The Desert Fight (Franz Waxman)

90. The Ride to Town (Victor Young)

91. The Ride to Town

92. Apotheosis and End Title (Victor Young)

93. Black is the Color

94. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

95. Varsovienne

96 Varsovienne

97. The Call of the Far-Away Hills

 

By the way, if anyone saw TCM's broadcast of the 1958 Paramount picture "I Married a Monster from Outer Space" earlier this week, you heard a few selections from "Shane". Most of the score of that one consisted of music cues from earlier Paramount films. From "Shane" they used the selections Trouble Ahead (four times), Cemetery Hill, and Grafton's Store (Part 2) (once each).

 

.

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"Mother wants you! I know she does!"

 

(sniff sniff) OK, I've dried my tears. :)

 

Shane always makes me bawl.

 

I want to see this movie on the BIG screen!! It cries out for that.

 

Hi Musicalnovelty: I want to thank you for that article

contemporaneous to Shane's original release---very interesting

But most interesting was your breakdown for the music score. I

recently read a book on music in westerns and I learned to pay

closer attention to what and how music and traditional tunes are

used in the genre. There are three westerns that are for me the

most emotional, and all three feature music that affects me strongly:

The Searchers, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and

Shane.

 

Victor Young's score is perfect. Right down to the motifs for the

different characters and the little tune at the dance, "Goodbye Old Paint."

But the main theme is what really gets me (I feel another sob coming

on!)

 

Hello, MarianStarrett! Thematically, Shane runs deep and

wide and I reckon there are many parallels to be drawn to many conflicts

and situations people can face. It's a story that also reaches across

generations, I like to think.

 

Howdy, Shiftless Grimes! Have a sody pop! Say! Why'd the

dog just slink out of the room? :P

 

I'm so glad you enjoyed it---I just watched it again and it never

palls, never fails to get to me in all kinds of ways. Each time I see

it I appreciate more and more all the work director George Stevens

put into making this film. Before the film started Ben Mankiewicz

talked a little about that, about the months that went into preparing

shooting and especially into the oh, so careful post production.

This was indeed, a director's film, but one in which the director had

extraordinary material to work with.

 

So why has it soared so high on your list of favorites?

 

For those who have always rated it highly---what do you think its strenghts are...why

has it endured as a favorite for you?

 

And how about this shot, hmm? Is that a miracle shot or what? Hard

to see in a small screencap but it opens the film in a special, special way.

That kind of shot just can't be planned, can it?

Shane-1.jpg

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*Well, I just finished watching Shane for the first time and I thought it was*

*"fantastico!" It's now my third favorite western. It's a very strong, emotional film.*

 

It is always good to hear from new fans of "Shane" and especially someone who'd put it so high atop his list of favorite westerns. Hope you'll have a chance to tell us more about how the movie made you feel.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> Hello, MarianStarrett! Thematically, Shane runs deep and

> wide and I reckon there are many parallels to be drawn to many conflicts

> and situations people can face. It's a story that also reaches across

> generations, I like to think.

>

 

Yes, I think the parallels are there and always worth exploring. The ways in which it can reach across generations is something I had not thought much about, but I guess it can work on different levels depending on one's age, with little kids identifying with little Joey and the grown-ups with one or more of the adult characters. I like that you can find varying levels of aggressiveness and restraint within the main characters, and that the character of Shane is so very multi-layered, he's definitely a complex character with subtle nuances of characterization.

 

Is it OK to talk about the movie's closing shot now? I want to say what I think but not until everybody else is ready.

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Hi Miss G,

 

I am actually holding a copy of *Shane* in my hand right now and typing with the other. :D

 

No excuses this time! I've seen this a few times over the years but will watch it tonight just to refresh my memory.

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Is it OK to talk about the movie's closing shot now? I want to say what I think but not until everybody else is ready.

 

For myself, I'm casual and loose about however the conversation flows. Whatever

it is about the film anyone has to say, whenever they want to say it. A little heads up

about any major spoilers might be advisable.

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Howdee, Mr. Molo!

 

I am actually holding a copy of Shane in my hand right now and typing with the other.

 

I knew you were a man of many talents.

 

No excuses this time! I've seen this a few times over the years but will watch it tonight just to refresh my memory.

 

I can watch it over and over and over again and always discover something new. See

you at Starrett's. Just ride around the garden, if you don't mind. :D

 

And please don't let Stonewall Torrey and Shiftless sidetrack you to Grafton's bar. :P

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I thought I'd mosey on over here because I just saw SHANE (after many years) and I'm always struck by the complexity of Shane's character.

He's both a story-book white knight and a lonely weary human being who has to bear the burdens of his noble protector role. He's mythic but also very real.

I like the way Ladd sees, and is seen, by Joey (i.e., us) for the first time in medium close-up. Shane's smile is quietly heroic, charismatic, gentle, bemused, and "good". For me, this is the most important shot in the movie, because he's not shown as "real", only iconic:

 

shane193.jpeg

 

Message was edited by: Bronxgirl48

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> At some point, perhaps, we could even discuss/debate

> what the enigmatic _ending_ to Shane could mean....

> what happens to Shane? I recently spotted something in

> the last shot that I never picked up in all the years

> I've watched this movie---and probably never would

> have if I hadn't been taking screencaps. More on

> that later.

>

 

I have been thinking about this for a while now. :)

 

(POSSIBLE SPOILERS)

 

I'd like to hear what every one thinks about the ending and whether or not there's something subtle in the last shot(s) that is easy to miss. I think there is, and part of it depends on just how badly you think Shane's been wounded in the gunfight, and why he wouldn't bother to head over to the Starrett's to get the wound tended to. (In this regard it reminded me slightly of the last shot in "El Cid")

 

There is also, of course, the seemingly obvious fact that the next-to-last shot in the movie totally complements the opening shot, and in a subtle way suggests that perhaps Shane has gone full circle, that a cycle has just been completed.

 

And it also works (for me at least) on another level, because seeing the hero (or heroes) riding into the horizon is a recurring image in westerns that has been used many times before and since, but rarely to such touching effect as it is done here.

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Howdy Lady B!

 

He's both a story-book white knight and a lonely weary human being who has to bear the burdens of his noble protector role. He's mythic but also very real.

 

Perfect description! I love that Stevens cast Alan Ladd for this incredible role of

a lifetime. His somewhat melancholy mien, contrasted with his blonde good

looks brings out just those conflicting qualities you describe. It's a fantastic

performance and just a wonderful, wonderful character.

 

I like the way Ladd sees, and is seen, by Joey (i.e., us) for the first time in medium close-up. Shane's smile is quietly heroic, charismatic, gentle, bemused, and "good". For me, this is the most important shot in the movie, because he's not shown as "real", only iconic:

 

Good call, I was very struck by the shot, too, and the song that Jean Arthur's "Marian" is

softly singing as he rides up...

 

Shane-4.jpg?t=1238900050

 

B---did you catch the way Stevens sort of bookends the film with a similar medium shot,

this time in deathly, dark tones, in contrast to that glorious blue sky that framed the earlier

shot:

 

Shane-485.jpg?t=1238899929

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Howdy, Fordy Guns -- Howdy, Shiftless Grimes! Have a sody pop! Say! Why'd

the dog just slink out of the room?

 

And the women run!

 

I'm so glad you enjoyed it---I just watched it again and it never

palls, never fails to get to me in all kinds of ways. Each time I see

it I appreciate more and more all the work director George Stevens

put into making this film. Before the film started Ben Mankiewicz

talked a little about that, about the months that went into preparing

shooting and especially into the oh, so careful post production.

This was indeed, a director's film, but one in which the director had

extraordinary material to work with.

 

I thought the direction was terrific, especially the fight scenes. I loved the

close-ups. Stevens was definitely a meticulous director.

 

So why has it soared so high on your list of favorites?

 

My favorite western of all time pays homage to (steals from) Shane, that being

Once Upon a Time in the West. "Harmonica" (Charles Bronson) is "Shane"

(Alan Ladd) with a twist.

 

I also loved the "super hero" aspect of Shane. Shane arrives wearing his "costume"

but then he attempts to become a regular man only to realize he must return to who

he really is, so he puts his "costume" back on. This is very "Batman" to me. As

Bronxie so aptly wrote, Shane is a mythical figure. I like that.

 

Do you want my take on the final shot?

 

shane2.jpg

 

You know, I actually thought Alan Ladd looked a lot like Gary Cooper at some points

in the film.

 

shane1.jpg

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I thought the direction was terrific, especially the fight scenes. I loved the

close-ups.

 

I love the fight scenes! Stevens wanted them really brutal and he did

wonderful things with sound and the placement of the camera, the

editing---and above all, it looks to me that no stunt doubles were used.

Anyway, the fights are my favorite of any I've ever seen in movies. I

know, it sounds awful to say that. :P

 

My favorite western of all time pays homage to (steals from) Shane, that being

Once Upon a Time in the West. "Harmonica" (Charles Bronson) is "Shane"

(Alan Ladd) with a twist.

 

Oh, I see. Well, I'm not surprised, Shane is very influential. It was built to last.

 

I also loved the "super hero" aspect of Shane. Shane arrives wearing his "costume"

but then he attempts to become a regular man only to realize he must return to who

he really is, so he puts his "costume" back on. This is very "Batman" to me. As

Bronxie so aptly wrote, Shane is a mythical figure. I like that.

 

I feel like Shane looked vulnerable in the farm clothes. It was rather touching.

He didn't look comfortable in them, which is interesting. "Can't break the mold."

 

Shane-155.jpg?t=1238908710

 

You know, I actually thought Alan Ladd looked a lot like Gary Cooper at some points

in the film.

 

The character is one I think would have been a good fit for Coop. He's the only other

actor I can imagine casting in the role, though Alan Ladd makes it his own. He

brings a sadness and lonely quality to it peculiarly his own and I think that's essential

to Shane.

 

Do you want my take on the final shot?

 

The more the merrier!

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Hello there Miss Goddess!!!!! And thank you so much for starting this thread.... I am really happy to see you all off to a good start here...

 

I have always liked this film, though I must confess that I haven't appreciated it as much as I should until later years... The first time I watched it I was a lot younger and it was just a "cowboy" movie to me... But as I got older, and came across it again later on.... I started noticing all the interesting layers and the depth in some of the characters.

 

And I think the "super hero" angle that was mentioned is a good one... He rides in as a mysterious stranger... and he takes a stand with the folks who need his help. He rescues those who need to be rescued. He becomes the object of worship for a young impressionable kid who only sees the excitement and glory of fighting but has not yet learned or come to understand that gunfights mean life and death and that sometimes, real men DON'T fight with their fists or guns (but other times they do). And through all this, in many ways, Shane still ends up leaving as... a mysterious stranger. (very superhero-ish indeed)

 

April.... you are right... it is an emotional film. It is filled with a lot of "human" weakness and also a lot of strength. There is more than one kind of conflict going on in the story as well...

 

I was not able to be home tonight when this aired.... but I am going to go watch my tape and will come back more for a little more chat. I am sure YOU have some more interesting commentary, little lady and I will be interested in what others have to say as well.

 

And PS... Mr. Muddy Boots.... TWO great westerns in ONE week.... what IS the world coming to????? :P

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

>

> I also loved the "super hero" aspect of Shane. Shane arrives wearing his "costume"

> but then he attempts to become a regular man only to realize he must return to who

> he really is, so he puts his "costume" back on. This is very "Batman" to me. As

> Bronxie so aptly wrote, Shane is a mythical figure. I like that.

>

 

There is definitely something mythical about Shane. And who can dislike a Western where the good guy wears the white hat and the bad guy wears the black hat? ;)

 

> Do you want my take on the final shot?

>

 

I'm sure we're all dying to know what you made of that final shot. :P

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SPOILER! GO AWAY, SPOILER!

 

I love the fight scenes! Stevens wanted them really brutal and he did

wonderful things with sound and the placement of the camera, the

editing---and above all, it looks to me that no stunt doubles were used.

Anyway, the fights are my favorite of any I've ever seen in movies. I

know, it sounds awful to say that.

 

The sound, editing, choreography, and energy were all exceptional. I also loved the

usage of animals during the fight scene between Shane and Joe (Van Heflin).

 

I was also very taken by the sound of Shane's first gunshot. A very powerful moment.

 

Oh, I see. Well, I'm not surprised, Shane is very influential. It was built to last.

 

I was also surprised to see Taxi Driver show up in Shane. I never knew

Taxi Driver was Martin Scorsese's Shane. Awesome!

 

shane5.jpg

 

shane6.jpg

 

I feel like Shane looked vulnerable in the farm clothes. It was rather touching.

He didn't look comfortable in them, which is interesting. "Can't break the mold."

 

Good point. Shane really did look mighty good in his threads. As Shane wisely

says:

 

shane7.jpg

 

A man cannot go around looking to be what others wish him to be if it's not truly

him. Who are you then? A person must come to respect who you are, not who they

want you to be.

 

I believe Shane is an excellent parental film.

 

The character is one I think would have been a good fit for Coop. He's the only other

actor I can imagine casting in the role, though Alan Ladd makes it his own. He

brings a sadness and lonely quality to it peculiarly his own and I think that's essential

to Shane.

 

I have only seen two Ladd films and they are both rather similar: Shane and

This Gun for Hire. Both are sacrificial.

 

Do you want my take on the final shot?

 

The more the merrier!

 

I took it to mean Shane is dead. He climbs cemetery hill and then he disappears below

the hill; he's beneath the ground. Despite the victory, there is a darkness over the land.

Shane is not to come back.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> I took it to mean Shane is dead. He climbs cemetery hill and then he disappears below

> the hill; he's beneath the ground. Despite the victory, there is a darkness over the land.

> Shane is not to come back.

 

Not bad. And there is at least one tombstone nearby (that I could see).

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> {quote:title=MarianStarrett wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> > At some point, perhaps, we could even discuss/debate

> > what the enigmatic _ending_ to Shane could mean....

> > what happens to Shane? I recently spotted something in

> > the last shot that I never picked up in all the years

> > I've watched this movie---and probably never would

> > have if I hadn't been taking screencaps. More on

> > that later.

> >

>

> I have been thinking about this for a while now. :)

>

> (POSSIBLE SPOILERS)

>

> I'd like to hear what every one thinks about the ending and whether or not there's something subtle in the last shot(s) that is easy to miss. I think there is, and part of it depends on just how badly you think Shane's been wounded in the gunfight, and why he wouldn't bother to head over to the Starrett's to get the wound tended to. (In this regard it reminded me slightly of the last shot in "El Cid")

>

> There is also, of course, the seemingly obvious fact that the next-to-last shot in the movie totally complements the opening shot, and in a subtle way suggests that perhaps Shane has gone full circle, that a cycle has just been completed.

>

> And it also works (for me at least) on another level, because seeing the hero (or heroes) riding into the horizon is a recurring image in westerns that has been used many times before and since, but rarely to such touching effect as it is done here.

 

Welcome to the forums, Miss Starrett!

 

Glad you enjoyed watching "Shane" once again - you've made some pretty good points there, especially in regards to the ending of the movie. Seems like others are starting to follow your lead! ;)

 

Don't be a stranger now! B-)

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>Goddess wrote:

>"Shane, are you doing this for me?"

>Marian Starrett....

>Did he, Jake? What do you think?

 

An unequivocal yes. Yes, he *did it* for her.

 

Why?

 

Shane is an honorable man who lives by a code and in that code is a belief not to take advantage of another man's wife--even though he deeply loves her and she is *in love* with him.

 

Big Joe knows it, too. Remember the part in the movie where he says I can see and I know you will be taken care of if something happens to me.

 

He was despondent and honest and expected to die confronting Ryker and Wilson.

 

But after Chris Calloway tells Shane about the scheme to kill Starett, Shane ultimately realizes his fate is, and always was, to confront Ryker and Wilson and go there to *kill them.*

 

Which he is very good at...

 

Shane and Marian have a love that must not come to fruition. Shane knew this and took the only course available to him to live by his code.

 

*""Shane did what he had to do, Joey."*

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Hi everybody.

 

I mentioned Shane on the cinematography thread already, and before we get into motivations and plot stuff, I thought I would mention some of the stuff that caught my eye cinematically.

 

The opening shot of the deer that you posted, MissG, is probably the most heartstopping scene in the movie. Incredible! I thought it was interesting that at the beginning, the valley under the mountain was seen as breathtakingly beautiful and serene. As the story goes on, the sheltering mountain becomes a harbinger of evil. The peaceful scene in which Shane rides up, scaring off the deer was SO important in setting up the storyline.

 

Photobucket

Here is another scene which mimics the opening with the deer.

 

After that gorgeous opening, the movie literally gets darker and darker - it progresses slowly, building up tension. I thought the most telling shots in the movie were the ones of Graftons (interesting name). Graftons is always seen blocking out the sun, and the view. It is a monolith. It`is a blot on the landscape that taints everything around it - including the mountain and valley.

 

The scene that caught my eye was, of course, the funeral scene. It was very Fordian to me, but with a Stevens twist. I can't get enough of this scene - to me, this (and the scene preceding it) is the best one in the movie. It also reminds me of the scene in *Giant* of Angel III, the war hero, coming home. Torrey's death and subsequent funeral are, I think, at the dead center of the movie, and so Torrey's death can be seen as a pivot point. His death is the wake up call to Shane. No amount of even handed talk or homesteader meetings will stop the evil intruding itself further and further into the valley.

 

I hope no one will mind if I post some pictures from that scene - they are beautiful. These are in the same order that Stevens cut them in. Notice the emphasis on the _children_. What they see, what they hear... and what they KNOW. Also look for the contrast between death and new life:

 

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

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Photobucket

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Photobucket

Photobucket

 

At the end of the funeral comes what, to me, is the most spectacular pan in the movie. The stark clear sky behind the mourners gives way to ominous clouds. The camera pans across toward the mountain, which now seems menacing to us. And finally, the mountain itself turns into Graftons:

 

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

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