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Movie Music


sellyoulloyd

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This is right down my alley--but not my favorite Sinatra film songs.( My favorites are "All the Way" and "Your hooked, you're cooked, you're caught in the Tender Trap.")

 

 

But the Jules Styne songs are as follows:

 

"I Fall in Love Too Easily"--*Anchors Away*

 

*Three Coins in the Fountain*, ditto

 

Edited by: cujas on Sep 9, 2010 5:57 PM

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I'll grudgingly give this one to you. What I really had in mind were movies Sinatra appeared in. He didn't appear in THREE COINS IN THE FOUNTAIN but DID sing the title song. It's my fault for not wording the question more specifically. What I would have had in mind for the second one was IT HAPPENED IN BROOKLYN with, e.g., "Time After Time"........Your thread.

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Mr. Fi--you know I can't read your mind, but I'm sure it's full of Sinatra.

 

Next: 2 Movie studio composers/arranger music men--

 

These men were at 2 different studios and they were the best at what they did.

 

1 composed a cello concerto for a movie.

 

the other one adapted and arranged a famous classical symphony into an opera for a movie.

 

Both films were Golden era from big studios. Plus each movie starred a Top Female Actress from the Golden era.

 

Please give us the Studio Music man, the movie, the Movie Star--in the case of the opera: the name of the opera, the symphony it was derived from and its composer.

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To summarize--

 

We need 2 top Studio Music Men: 1 wrote a cello concerto, the other adapted an opera from a famous classical symphony

 

Both movies starred top actress

 

Hint: One Actress was famous for her dramatic roles, the other one was famous for her singing.

 

Edited by: cujas on Sep 11, 2010 5:03 PM

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The "Hollenius' Cello Concerto" was composed by Erich Korngold for the 1946 film "Deception" starring Bette Davis...

 

"Maytime", composed by Sigmund Romberg and starring Jeannette MacDonald, had a number called "Czaritza", based on Symphony #5 by Pete Tchaikovsky...

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Thanks, Cujas. Being an operetta buff, I have always loved the music of Romberg, Friml, and Lehar....

 

Whenever we think of songs, the composers' names always come to mind first. This time I will focus on the lyricists, since the Lorenz Hart biography, "Words and Music", was recently featured on TCM.

 

Question: This lyricist had 16 Academy Award nominations, the second highest. He received double nominations in the same year two times. He deservedly won three, for songs that everyone will recognize. In addition, in the 1960s, he wrote the lyrics for the theme song of an animated series which has since become synonymous with the title character and which can be heard in the movies. Name the lyricist, the three songs for which he won the Oscar, and the animated series...

 

Edited by: mudskipper on Sep 12, 2010 11:40 PM

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Correct, Miles. He was second only to Johnny Mercer in the number of Oscar nominations...And who could forget those songs? In addition to those three, he was also nominated for "April Love", "A Very Precious Love", "Friendly Persuasion", and "A Certain Smile" . He also wrote the lyrics for "Anastasia", "The Green Leaves of Summer", "The Loveliest Night Of The Year", "Somewhere My Love" (from Dr. Zhivago), "Doctor, Lawyer, Indian Chief", "Black Coffee", "I'll Remember Tonight" (from Mardi Gras) and a lot more...People remember Johnny Mercer, Lorenz Hart, and Gus Kahn. Now I hope they recognize Paul Francis Webster..

 

Your thread, Miles.

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Thanks. One of America's great songwriters was Jerome Kern. He was known for the productions "Show Boat" and "Roberta" that were adapted for the screen. He also wrote original music for movies such as "Swing Time". One of the songs that he wrote was featured in a movie that was released the same year that he died. He was nominated for an Oscar posthumously. If he had won, he would have preceded actor Peter Finch and lyricist Howard Ashman as posthumous winners, but the song did not win. Can you name the song that was nominated, but did not win? Wait, there's more. Can you name the picture it was from and who sang it? And even more, can you name the song that did win the Oscar that year?

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That would have been a correct answer except for the fact that "Centennial Summer" was a 1946 film and Kern died in 1945. Actually, the movie I'm looking for was released in late December of 1944 (I just looked it up), so I should probably revise the question to say that Kern died after the movie was released, but before the Oscar nominations were made. I gave you an extra little clue in the original question. Youu should be able to find it now.

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Let's get this straight... Kern died in November, 1945 in New York City of a cerebral hemorrhage. He had successive Oscar nominations for best songs in 1945 for "Long Ago and Far Away" from "Cover Girl" performed by Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly and dubbed by Martha Mears ; in 1946 for the song "More and More" by Deanna Durbin from "Can't Help Singing"; and in 1947 for "All Through The Day" sung by Larry Stevens from "Centennial Summer".

 

Now, obviously, since the Oscars are held early in the year, Kern was still alive in 1945 when he lost to Richard Rodgers for "It Might as Well Be Spring" from "State Fair". He died by the time the Academy awards were held in 1946. The winners that year were Harry Warren and Johnny Mercer for "On The Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe" from "The Harvey Girls"...So the answer must be, from the 1946 Oscars, "More and More" by Deanna Durbin from "Can't Help Singing"..

 

Elementary, my dear Watson.

 

Edited by: mudskipper on Sep 16, 2010 11:24 AM

 

Edited by: mudskipper on Sep 16, 2010 11:27 AM

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Apparently, Mr. Kern was a busy guy, even after he died. Mudskipper got it. If you look back at the original question, you'll see that I tried to help by asking for "more" and "even more". "Can't Help Singing" was Deanna Durbin's only movie in color. She sang "More And More" part way through the movie and she was joined in a reprisal of the song at the end of the picture by leading man Robert Paige. It was shown on TCM earlier this summer. This was a 1945 movie, as was "State Fair". The Oscar nominations and awards were made in 1946, after Kern's death. The winner that year was "It Might As Well Be Spring", which was written by Kern's old friends, Rogers and Hammerstein. They had few Oscar nominations because most of their songs heard in movies were originally in their Broadway shows, and were not eligible for original song Oscars. "State Fair" was an exception. At that time many songs could be nominated for Oscars. The rule was later changed to a five song limit. This information came from wikipedia. Mudskipper's thread, unless he wants to give it away.

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The line is " Is it all going in one ear, and out the other? ". The song is "Hey There" from "The Pajama Game". It was sung in the movie by both John Raitt and Doris Day. It was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross. It became a big hit for Rosemary Clooney and it was also recorded by Frank Sinatra.

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