Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Thanks, when you mentioned Scotland I seemed to remember Pat Boone singing in a kilt in that movie. Now: The Avalon Boys were a singing group that made a few movie appearances. Their bass singer went on to be a well known character actor. In the thirties, they sang a song with Laurel and Hardy in a movie. Can you name the movie, the song, and the bass singer?

Link to post
Share on other sites

All correct, Miles. Did you know that Bob Nolan originally titled this song "Tumbling Tumble Leaves" ?...He wrote the song in Los Angeles and after he re-worked it, Gene Autry made it popular in his movie with the same title....Your thread....

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't know about the title change, but I did know that Gene Autry sang it in one of his very first movies. Bob Nolan and Roy Rogers helped organize the Sons Of The Pioneers. They were a radio singing group until Roy became a movie star and brought the group along with him. In the late forties, Republic studios dropped the Pioneers from Roy's pictures and replaced them with Foy Willing And The Riders Of The Purple Sage. Foy's boys were cheaper than Nolan's, and Republic boss Herb Yates was a notorious tightwad. Now, speaking of campfire songs, in a western made in the fifties, Fess Parker sings a song about a legendary mountain man while sitting around a campfire with a group of children. Can you name the song and the movie that it was from?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess it's time for a clue. In the past, mudskipper has referred to some of the songs that I have posted about as "obscure", and I have protested mildly, claiming that they were big hits in their day. This one, however, is a bit obscure, so I will tell you this. Fess Parker was under contract to Walt Disney at the time. Several of the children in the film were regulars on "The Mickey Mouse Club", one from the "Spin And Marty" series, and the others were mousketeers. Now, if you remember the names of some of those youngsters, the rest shouldn't be too difficult. Give it a shot!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, cujas. This was a theatrical feature made after the Davy Crockett series. I'll probably give it away by telling you who was in it, but here goes. David Stollery who was Marty in the "Spin and Marty" serials was one of the kids. Others included mouseketeers Karen Pendleton, Cubby O'Brien, Doreen Tracy, and Tommy Cole. Throw in George "Superman" Reeves, marauding Indians and some songs and you've got the makings of a movie that every kid in America wanted to see. Well, it wasn't a classic like "Old Yeller", but it wasn't bad. Now do you know the title of the movie and the song that Fess Parker sings to the kids?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, the movie was "Westward Ho The Wagons", with Fess Parker leading a wagon train to Oregon. This was George Reeves' final film...The song was "The Ballad of John Colter". Colter was a mountain man and a member of the Lewis and Clark expedition. The original script for Cornel Wilde's "The Naked Prey" was reportedly based on John Colter being pursued by Blackfoot Indians in Wyoming....

 

 

And I did my research, Miles...

 

Edited by: mudskipper on Nov 2, 2010 1:31 AM

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now aren't you glad you did the research, Skipper? Look at how much you learned. My job is to educate as well as entertain. In case you don't know the song, here are the lyrics:

 

Ballad of John Colter

 

John Colter was a trapper,

 

And he knew the ways of game,

But it wasn't for his trappin'

 

That he won immortal fame.

 

He traveled up the Yellowstone

 

And discovered Colter's Hell.

But it isn't of his geysers

 

That my yarn is going to tell. (nosir!)

 

Sing of the bravest mountain man

Sing of the strong and the fleet

Colter's courage was in his heart

And his speed was in his feet.

 

John Colter knew the Blackfeet

 

Claimed the land off to the west,

 

But he said he'd do his trappin'

 

Where the trappin it was best.

 

He went and took his share of fur,

 

Then started back to Fort Manuel. (Fess Parker pronounced it )

 

But he didn't get no warnin'

 

Til he heard the Blackfeet yell.

 

Sing of the bravest mountain man

Sing of the strong and the fleet

Colter's courage was in his heart

And his speed was in his feet.

 

The Blackfoot chief said to his men,

 

"This prisoner is so brave,

 

We take his clothes, then turn him loose,

 

With a chance his scalp to save."

 

They set him loose without his clothes,

 

Without his shoes and gun.

 

His courage was his only hope,

 

A race for his life to run.

 

Their fastest runners after him,

 

Their lances wavin' high,

 

The knowledge pounding in his heart

 

That he had to win or die.

 

Sing of the bravest mountain man

Sing of the strong and the fleet

Colter's courage was in his heart

And his speed was in his feet.

 

Well John Colter ran and ran, and he ran and he ran

 

Like an antelope in fright.

 

Straight across the cactus thickets

 

Like an arrow in its flight.

 

Lungs a-burstin' with the effort,

 

Every muscle starts to scream.

 

Six miles of endless runnin'?

 

Suddenly there's a stream.

 

Dives deep into the water,

 

Breathin' through a hollow reed,

 

Leavin Blackfoot runners baffled

 

By the wonder of his speed.

 

John Waited til the red men left,

 

Then walked back to fort Manual,

 

Three hundred miles of barefoot trail.

 

Said he'd like to rest a spell.

 

Sing of the bravest mountain man

Sing of the strong and the fleet

Colter's courage was in his heart

And his speed was in his feet.

 

Fess Parker's rendition was very good. It was kind of half sung and half recited. And you're right about "The Naked Prey". Good job, Mudskipper. You deserve plaudits for your efforts. Now it's your turn.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Miles...

 

This melody from the Civil War era was used as the title song in an Elvis Presley movie. He also used it in another movie later, although he changed the lyrics both times....It was also used as background music in two films involving cadets since it has been associated with West Point since 1865....

Name the song or melody, the two Elvis Presley movies and the two West Point movies....

Link to post
Share on other sites

The melody for "Love Me tender" was derived from "Aura Lee", a civil war song composed and written by W.W. Fosdick and George Poulton. It was adapted for the U.S. Military Academy and called "Army Blue" by George Olmstead, with lyrics specific to the academy...The Elvis Presley movies are "Love Me tender" and "The Trouble With Girls"...The West Point movies are "The Long Gray Line" and "West Point Story"...Your thread, Six.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...