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sellyoulloyd

Movie Music

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Thanks. I thought it probably was from "Bundle Of Joy" because Eddie Fisher made so few movies, but I checked IMDB and it was not listed as being in the soundtrack. Also, cujas said it was an MGM film and "Bundle Of Joy" is listed as an RKO release. That's where my confusion came from. I recall that Eddie fisher had a nightly TV show for fifteen minutes. It was called "Coke Time" and was sponsored by Coca-Cola, "At home, at work, or on the way".

Now, here's a little musical history lesson about a song that became a hit only after several rewrites. In the 1930's, a well known songwriting team, at least, soon to be well known, wrote a song for an MGM movie that was supposed to feature Jean Harlow singing a prayer. The lyrics were something like:

 

Oh Lord, if you're not busy up there,

I ask for help with a prayer,

So please don't give me the air.

 

Nether the song nor Jean Harlow appeared in the final version of the film. Next, It was rewritten and given a different title. It was to be used in a crime drama. The new lyrics were:

 

Act one, you gulp your coffee and run,

Into the subway you crowd,

Don't breathe, it isn't allowed.

 

The producers didn't like it and cut it, but they needed a song for a nightclub scene. The songwriters changed the title and lyrics once more and it was sung by a white actress in blackface. Now the lyrics were:

 

Oh Lord, I could be good to a lover,

But then I always discover,

The bad in every man.

 

The song was not a hit. The songwriters rewrote it one more time and released it commercially. It became the theme music for the Hollywood Hotel radio program and was featured as an instrumental only number in another MGM movie in the late thirties with a well known comedy team. The song has been recorded by many artists over the years, including rock and roll versions. Can you name the song as we know it, the songwriters, and that late thirties comedy film that it was featured in?

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"Blue Moon"

 

Rodgers and Hart

 

"At the Circus"

 

Thank you, that was indeed a fascinating musical history lesson. I only recognized what it was by the rhythm.

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Yes, the first film was "Hollywood Party", a strange mixture of comedy bits,featuring Jimmy Durante, Laurel and Hardy, and the Three Stooges. The song's working title was "Prayer". The crime drama was "Manhattan Melodrama", famous because it was the picture that John Dillinger had gone to see the night he was shot by the FBI. The song had been retitled "It's Just That Kind Of Play", but that was scrapped. It was rewritten as "The Bad In Every Man" and was sung by Shirley Ross. She became better known for the song "Thanks For The Memory" with Bob Hope In "The Big Broadcast Of 1938". The song finally became "Blue Moon" and was played as a harp solo by Harpo Marx in "At The Circus" in 1939. Nitratefiend, it's your turn now.

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Name two (once) well-known songs in which this phrase -- or a semblance thereof -- appears:

 

"off on a spree"

 

...and the movies in which the songs were used. (I found two movies for one of the two songs.)

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One of them came immediately to mind. "The Wiffenpoof Song" has the line:

 

Gentleman songsters off on a spree,

Doomed from here to eternity

 

It was used in the soundtrack of "Twelve O'Clock High" in 1949, and it was also used in the 1952 comedy "Monkey Business" with Cary Grant and Ginger Rogers. The other is a great novelty tune called "Three Little Fishies" It was a hit for Kay Kyser and his band, but it originally had been done by Hal Kemp and his orchestra. It featured the line:

 

Three little fishies went off on a spree,

And they swam and they swam right out to the sea.

 

It was used in the soundtrack of an early Brooke Shields movie that was titled "Alice, Sweet Alice" when I saw it. It also had alternate titles of "First Communion" and "Communion". In it, little Brooke had an older sister who was a killer.

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Really good, Miles. These were the only two songs I could think of that include that unusual phrase. If anyone can think of another, I'd like to hear what it is.

 

Now, these are both silly songs.In fact, according to Wikipedia (since I haven't seen it in a long time), that's exactly what Marilyn Monroe tells Cary Grant when he starts singing "The Whiffenpoof Song" to her in the 1952 "Monkey Business."

 

But "Itty Bitty Poo'" is on a whole other level. In the "Goof Gas Attack" story arc of Rocky and Bullwinkle episodes, it appears at the bottom of an intelligence chart, below "nitwit" and "dunce." I wasn't sure what movie it might have appeared in, but my sources say there was one called "Spring Reunion" from 1957.

 

Miles's thread.

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Thanks. Kay Kyser used to introduce his songs on recordings, much like Sammy Kaye did. For "Three Little Fishies" he introduced his singers as Sully Mason, Ginny Simms, and Harry "Boop Be Doop Be Doop" Babbitt. That was because of the song's famous line "Boop Boop Diddem Doddem Woddem Choo". Please don't hold me to the spelling. They sure don't write them like that anymore!

Now, here's part of a movie song you might recognize:

 

I've been a roaming Romeo,

My Juliettes have been many,

But now my roaming days are gone.

Too many irons in the fire,

Is worse than not having any,

I've had my share and from now on.....

 

Can you name the song, singer, composer, and movie?

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I'll give this hint. The movie featured two actresses in supporting roles who, years later, would become icons of 50's television.

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follow the fleet ...irving berlin.....i'm puttin all my eggs in one basket...fred astaire...harriet hilliard and ginger rogers

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Metz got it. In "Follow the Fleet" Harriet Hilliard Nelson plays the plain jane sister of Ginger Rogers. Lucy is the friend who gives Harriet a makeover. In those years Lucy was working at RKO. Later, she and Desi bought the place and called it Desilu Productions. Your turn, metz.

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"Let's Face The Music & Dance"

 

That was the gown with the Heavily-beaded sleeves that knocked Fred out on the first pirouette--but he kept on dancing--from *Follow the Fleet*

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"So this is the kingdom of heaven"---

 

Song, singer, & movie please.

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