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I think it was written by Cole Porter. The movie is "You'll Never Get Rich". The movie starred Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth. Fred sang and danced this number with a chorus.

 

I feel I owe an apology to metz for the previous question. I was relying on my memory for "I'm In The Mood For Love". I thought that the three women sang it as a group, but IMDB says that Frances Langford sang it by herself. Sorry, metz. I'll try to check my facts before my next post.

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Thanks. Here's one that I posted about some months ago on another thread, but it seems like a good time to revive it. Irving Berlin had a modest hit with a song he wrote during World War I. Some years later, he needed a holiday song for a Broadway musical revue, so he took that old song, changed the opening melody, and wrote new lyrics. He also gave it a new title. A few years later, it was sung in a movie musical that featured his songs. Four years after that film was released, it showed up in yet another musical film, this time sung by one of the top singers of the day. Eventually, it became the title tune of a movie. Yes, I'm referring to "Easter Parade". It was sung by Fred Astaire and Judy Garland in the movie of the same name. Can you name the movies it appeared in previously and who sang it in those films? Can you name the 1933 revue that it first appeared in and who introduced it on Broadway? And finally, can you name the original song that Irving Berlin adapted it from? Have a Happy Easter!

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Ok, Miles, here goes....The melody for "Easter Parade" was originally composed by Irving Berlin in 1917 and titled "Smile And Show Your Dimple". It wasn't very popular.

He then changed the title to "Easter Parade" and replaced the lyrics with words referring to the holiday. The new song was introduced by Clifton Webb and Marilyn Miller in the Broadway show "As Thousands Cheer"(1933) (which has nothing to do with the later movie with Kathryn Grayson)..

 

In 1938, it was sung by Don Ameche and chorus in the movie "Alexander's Ragtime Band" which featured Irving's songs. It was then sung by Bing Crosby four years later in "Holiday Inn"(1942), and by also by Judy Garland and Fred Astaire in the movie "Easter Parade" in 1948...It was also featured in the Rankin and Bass TV production, "The First Easter Rabbit" in 1976...

 

Edited by: mudskipper on Apr 23, 2011 10:06 PM

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Thanks, Miles../

 

Joni James had a hit record when she covered this song from a movie:

 

"The stars may deceive you,

May vanish and leave you, be smart...

.....

The breeze softly sighing

In truth may be lying, be smart...

......"

 

Song ?...Movie?...Actor and original singer in movie?

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Correct..."Ten Thousand Bedrooms" was Dean Martin's first movie after his break-up with Jerry Lewis, and there was actually some concern whether he can make it alone. But then came "The Young Lions", a few more hit songs, and the Rat Pack...They should have given the lovely soprano, Anna Maria Alberghetti, more songs to sing...Your thread, Miles.

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Correct..."Ten Thousand Bedrooms" was Dean Martin's first movie after his break-up with Jerry Lewis, and there was actually some concern whether he can make it alone. But then came "The Young Lions", a few more hit songs, and the Rat Pack...They should have given the lovely soprano, Anna Maria Alberghetti, more songs to sing...Your thread, Miles.

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Thanks. Here's a verse that is quite well known.

 

The more I read the papers,

The less I comprehend

The world with all it's capers,

And how it all will end.

Nothing seems to be lasting,

But that isn't our affair.

We have something permanent,

I mean the way we care...

 

This song took on a little added significance when the movie it was featured in was released. Of course, if you've been following this thread, then it's very clear that I'm looking for the song title, movie, singer, and composers.

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Miles--like Bobby Short, you must be K-razy for the Gershwins too.

 

The song is "Our Love Is Here To Stay". It was originally written for the *Goldwyn Follies*. It appeared after George's death and Ira always saw it as a testament to his relationship with his brother.

 

The forgotten Kenny Baker sang this--I grew up watching Dennis Day, that's how the cookie crumbles.

 

Also, of course, Gene Kelly sang it to Leslie Caron on the banks of the Seine in *The American In Paris*.. I've often looked for that spot on the left bank. Then I remembered that the movie was made in Hollywood, USA aka Culver City.

 

S'WONDERFUL!

 

Edited by: cujas on Apr 30, 2011 5:43 PM

 

Edited by: cujas on Apr 30, 2011 5:44 PM

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Yes, cujas, it's very clear that our love for the Gershwins is here to stay! I just thought that, with so much Gershwin music on TCM tonight, it would be an appropriate question. "The Goldwyn Follies" was released shortly after George's death in 1937. It's amazing how many Gershwin songs are still being recorded today. Say, I guess you were an American in Paris at one time. Did you ever dance along the banks of the Seine or do a little "I Got Rhythm" number on the sidewalk like Gene Kelly? I bet you at least thought about it. Now, if you can stop dancing for a few minutes, it's your turn.

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Miles--Who could ask for anything more?

 

Next:--

 

"The living is easy

The living is high

All good Americans should come here to die."

 

Hint: stay with the previous subject.

 

You've got the routine--song, movie, performer (s) and composer (s)

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Bonjour, cujas!

 

The song is "Bonjour, Paris" from the movie "Funny Face". It was sung by Fred Astaire, Audrey Hepburn, and Kay Thompson when they first arrived in Paris. The song was not written by the Gershwins. It was written especially for the movie by Roger Edens and Leonard Gershe. Fred Astaire was in the Broadway show and thirty years later, he was in the movie version.

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Tres bien!

 

I would only add that Gene Kelly's co-director, Stanley Donen, directed *Funny Face*. And he really filmed the movie in Paris--*An American In Paris* was filmed on the backlot at MGM.

 

Miles, This next one is on you---

 

Edited by: cujas on May 4, 2011 6:14 PM

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Thanks. There seem to be a lot of romantic movies set in Paris. Here's something that has nothing to do with Paris.

 

Paradise cannot refuse us,

Never such a happy pair.

Everybody must excuse us,

If we walk on air.

All the shadows now will lose us,

Lucky stars are everywhere.

As a happy being,

Here's what I'm foreseeing...

 

 

This song and others in the movie were written by top songwriters, the movie had major musical stars, and was made by one of the big studios. Yet, the movie never became the hit that the studio had hoped for. There was also something unique about the choice of songs for the film. Can you name the song, movie, performers and songwriters? What was unique about the songs?

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The song was "For You, For Me, Forevermore" composed by George with lyrics by Ira Gershwin. It was sung by Dick Haymes and Betty Grable in the movie "The Shocking Miss Pilgrim", about a woman involved in the suffragette movement in the late 1800s.....The songs the Gershwins chose for the movie were leftover songs...Songs the brothers had made but never used...as a result of this "scraping the bottom of the barrel', none of the songs were memorable....However, here's a nice version by Andres Ascensio with a nice arrangement and pictures of George Gershwin:

 

 

Edited by: mudskipper on May 5, 2011 1:41 AM

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Yes, "The Shocking Miss Pilgrim" was made in 1947, about ten years after the death of George Gershwin. His brother, Ira, pulled some songs out of files that they had written together, but they had not released. Unfortunately, "For You, For Me, Forevermore" was about the only memorable one. However, since the songs had not been previously released, they were considered new songs and the movie has gone down in history as the last movie to feature original Gershwin songs. The original screenwriters who sold the story to Fox, were disappointed in how their story was changed to a musical vehicle for Betty Grable and Dick Haymes. Also, Betty did not have a chance to show off those famous legs. All in all, considering the talent involved, the movie was a bit of a disappointment. Good job, mudskipper. It's your turn next.

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Here's a nice song by lyricist E.Y. Harburg:

 

"Everywhere and everyday

People point to me and say,

'There's the guy that's going down in history'.

How'd I do the things I did,

To every man and every kid

That seems to be the one absorbing mystery.

How did I get by when things weren't so hot?

Mr. Ripley you can believe it or not..."

 

Name the song, singer, and movie...For extra points, name the two other songs that the singer will always be remembered for...

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