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sellyoulloyd

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Ok, but this from encyclopedia.com ??the song made little impression and it was later changed to a slower tempo at the advice of arranger Jimmy Dale.? And from nfo.net ??Jimmy Dale, an arranger, suggested that the piece be played in a slower tempo and in a more sentimental style. In 1928, Emile Seidel recorded it with Hoagy on the piano. In 1930, Isham Jones orchestra then recorded it in the new style.? So there seems to be at least some confusion about who was responsible for slowing the tempo down?

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Perhaps the credit should be bestowed upon more than one person...It might have gone like this...Jimmy Dale might have suggested to Hoagy and Isham to slow the tempo down...At that time, around '31 or '32, Victor Young was working with Isham and he and Isham were mainly responsible for the resulting arrangement, with Young in charge of the violins...I don't know if we can really determine just how much credit goes to whom...I based that on the "Cinema Rhapsodies Music by Victor Young" ....Eve or Finance's thread.

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How about four? They wrote "Pocketful Of Miracles" and "Where Love Has Gone" which both featured Bette Davis. They also wrote "Thoroughly Modern Millie" and "Star" which both starred Julie Andrews. Did you know that Jimmy Van Heusen took his name from the Van Heusen shirt company?

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And here's some more: "PARDNERS" with Dean and Jerry; "THE TENDER TRAP" with Frank and Debbie; "SAY ONE FOR ME" with Bing and Debbie; "POCKETFUL OF MIRACLES" with Glenn Ford and Bette Davis; "COME FLY WITH ME" with Dolores Hart and Hugh O Brian; and even "THE WORLD OF SUZIE WONG" with Bill Holden and Nancy Kwan....Now, let's not be too harsh on Finance....He's alright.

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The only song that you guys didn't mention (that I know of) is "Come Blow Your Horn". The best song out of all of those mentioned, IMHO, is "Star" .....Either Miles or ms can take the thread...........I don't understand what the fuss is all about. I promised to stay out of the fray about what was the ultimate correct answer. When the dust settled, ms awarded the thread to either Eve or me, so I took it. Did I do something wrong?

 

Edited by: finance on Jul 2, 2010 10:29 AM

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I'm not in the fray-- but I've just got to say: *Come Blow Your Horn* was the best movie theme that Cahn and Van Heusen wrote for Sinatra. "Take in some air and get your lips puckered, before you find you're simply too tuckered."

 

Miles, forgive, I couldn't help myself.

 

It's all yours Mr. Archer---

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You don't like, "If the lady's utterly charming, if the lady's chummy with kings, if her whims are close to alarming, and she's known to throw a few things--- if she's got a drink with her name in Jilly's Bar, then chances are, the lady's a STAR! ?

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Only Sinatra could get away with singing "The Woman That Got Away" and "The Gentleman is a Champ (to of all people VP Agnew).

 

But things aren't the same since Jilly left us.

 

Mr. Archer still has the next turn--

 

Edited by: cujas on Jul 2, 2010 3:06 PM

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Is it safe now? Let's hope so. In the thirties and forties, Twentieth Century Fox was known for their "Old Time" musicals, which were set in the period from the gay nineties to the roaring twenties. They featured songs from that earlier period as well as songs written especially for the movie. The ladies were usually played by Betty Grable, Alice Faye, Lynn Bari, and Carmen Miranda. The men were comprised of Don Ameche, John Payne, Dick Haymes, Tyrone Power, and Cesar Romero. Comic relief was provided by Jack Haley, Phil Silvers, and Jack Oakie. In one of these movies, the leading lady sang, what was at the time, a vintage song with some memorable lyrics. Some of the lines were:

I'm so very lonesome, awfully sad,

It's a long time since I've been glad,

But I know what I'll do, bye and bye,

I'll eat some worms and then I'll die

 

What was this song about worms? Who was the actress who sang it? What was the movie that she sang it in?

This isn't the ten clues thread, so I'll give you a major clue right now. The movie also featured the Oscar winning song that year. Please don't give partial answers. Just like Frank Sinatra sang, I want "all or nothing at all".

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OK, Miles...here goes--

 

The song you're looking for is "They Always Pick On Me", with music by Harry Von Tilzer and lyrics by Stanley Murphy. The phrase refers to the singer eating worms and dying just to spite those who always pick on her because they'll be sorry then. It was popularized by a singer named Ada Jones around 1911, which was 4 years before the time setting for the movie "Hello Frisco, Hello" 1915 -- when the first long distance telephone call from New York City to San Francisco was made . In the movie, it was sung by Tony Martin's ex-wife, Alice Faye.. .

 

.Another song from the movie, "You'll Never Know"(just how much I miss you...), also sung by Alice Faye, won the 1944 Oscar for best original song... Incidentally, some think part of the reason it won was because of the many servicemen overseas who were being missed by their loved ones during the war, although in itself it is a beautiful song...

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I just love it when people have to do a little research to answer my questions. Yes, Mudskipper is right. "They Always Pick On Me" was sung by Alice Faye in "Hello Frisco, Hello", a movie that also featured the Oscar winning song, "You'll Never Know". Alice Faye also sang "You'll Never Know" in a guest appearance in "Four Jills In A Jeep". Betty Boop sang "They Always Pick On Me" in a cartoon that featured Cab Calloway doing "Minnie the Moocher", (She was a real **** coocher), around 1932. You may recall that Alice Faye was the movie star that Archie Bunker used to dream about. You can see her with Shirley Temple and Jack Haley in "The Poor Little Rich Girl" coming up on July 23rd. Alice and Shirley will sing different versions of "When I'm with You". You'll also see Tony Martin in a cameo appearance and Gloria Stuart of "Titanic" fame. After the events of the last few days, I wonder if our friend finance is singing "They Always Pick On Me". Your turn, Muddy.

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Alright, I've got one...

 

Let's go back to the 40's... One of the best Latin American composers was nominated for the Best Song Oscar, but unfortunately went up against a blockbuster of a song by another great composer ... and lost. The song for which the Latin American composer was nominated had the same title as the movie. The movie's lead actor was not a particularly good singer, but was more of a dramatic actor (multiple Oscar nominations and one win) both in Hollywood and Broadway and achieved immortality because of one particular song he sang on the Broadway stage...Now, the questions: (a) Who was the Latin American composer and what was the title of the song he lost with ? (B) What was the name of the song that won the Oscar that year and who was the composer ? © Who was the actor in the losing movie and what particular, earlier song was he remembered for.?.. (d) Who was the composer of that song and what was the title of the Broadway play (?)...(.so, 3 songs, 3 composers, one actor and one play...someone should have a field day.)

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OK, lots to cover here.

a. Ernesto Lecuona wrote "Always In My Heart" for the film of the same name

b. "White Christmas" from "Holiday Inn" by Irving Berlin won the Oscar for 1942

c. Walter Huston sang "Always In My Heart" in the movie. He was famous for "September Song"

d. "September Song" was sung by Walter Huston in the play Knickerbocker Holiday. It was written by Kurt Weill with lyrics by Maxwell Anderson.

 

I am familiar with the song because I happen to have a 78 rpm record of "Always In My Heart" by the Glenn Miller Orchestra. The singer on the record is Ray Eberle, one of Glenn Miller's regular vocalists. The movie "Always In My Heart" has been shown on TCM, I believe, within the last year.

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Correct on all counts!!...

One of the reasons I brought that question up was I wanted Lecuona to get the recognition he deserves. A lot of people can sing and hum many of his works---"Malaguena", "The Breeze And I", "You Are Always In My Heart", "Siboney", "Noche Azul", "Maria LaO", the beautiful "RhapsodyOn Cuban Airs" and a lot of Afro-Cuban rhythms---but for some reason he is not well-known in the media...I hope this will introduce some of our friends to his music.( Don't get the Domingo CD of Lecuona's works. It's not very good. Get the piano versions by Thomas Tirino instead--he's the best interpreter of Lecuona)..

 

.And Walter Huston singing "September Song" is still the best version of that standard..His voice has that somewhat mature pitch that fits the lyrics and tone of the song....Ok, I'll get off my soapbox. Your thread, Miles.

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