Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

"Show Boat" (1929)


Recommended Posts

First of all, I apologize if this is the wrong section of the forums to bring up this movie. I understand it is mostly silent but that some sound sections were added at the last minute. In any event, I guess it started out as a silent and retains much of the characteristics of silents.

 

I'm very excited to see this on the schedule for next week, this one has been very hard to find for a very long time, and this showing on TCM should be a wonderful opportunity for those of us who'd really like to watch and/or record this one.

 

Has anyone here seen it before?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy Mama! I didn't see the 1929 SHOW BOAT on the schedule when is it on? Must confess, though I have a copy of this I have never watched it before. That's astounding given my Love for Laura La Plante!

 

The thing is, unless this is a newer restoration, there are spots were the sounds disc's, mainly musical stuff was not known to survive before. So there might be sequence or two that is completely Silent for a brief time? Not sure?

 

 

 

LauraLaPlanteRareJewel-1.png

 

*Laura La Plante, "A Rare Jewel"*

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not have I only seen it before but numerous times and it's my favorite version of all. Mainly because of the excellent chemistry between Laura and Joseph (Schildkraut) as the leads. Later versions also tend to soften Gay's abandonment of wife and child -- not this version. It's much grittier. Then of course you have Emily Fitzroy as the mother -- that face enough to scare away a battleship! lol But you know, she was a great character actress -- watch the myriad of emotions play over her face when Gay and Magnolia leave the boat with her grandchild to start a new life elsewhere.

 

Yes, there are silent and sound parts, so it's a hybrid, but that's fine. It seems to work here and isn't obnoxious like some other hybrids of the period.

 

Although it doesn't have the tunes of Jerome Kern it has a lovely vintage soundtrack that is often dreamy and bittersweet. It also has a very beautiful ending.

 

Yes, it is a lovely film. I can't believe you haven't watched it yet, Jeffrey! You will love it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jill,

 

I have had it for about three years. I think I got a copy from Scottman? So I am sure that it is a good quality recording. His stuff is always top notch! I will need to look it up. Matter of fact, I think it is a laser-disc transfer? Good movie for the Easter weekend!

 

It's interesting I colorized this photo of Laura La Plante twice last year. Once wearing a Pink dress, and the other violet. It seems that I only posted the Pink dress version on Photobucket? Can't find the other one at all?

 

 

 

 

LauraLaPlante-MuchToCuteMagicDimple.jpg

 

*Laura La Plante, "Magic Dimples Much To Cute!*

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's an ok film version that oddly is introduced by members of the original Broadway cast singing (including Helen Morgan). The idea of making a silent film version of this great musical show is odd, and the talking sequences are awkwardly done.

 

The glorious music is best done in the 1936 Irene Dunne version which includes great songs for Morgan, Paul Robeson, and even Hattie McDaniel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, it's not as good as the 1936 version. I can't understand why they would want to showcase the Broadway cast in the prologue of the 1929 version and not have anyone from the Broadway cast in the film! It only showed how badly cast most of the leads were for the 1929 version.

Most of the principle players in the 1936 version had either been in the original Broadway cast , or had played in some version of SHOWBOAT before making that film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Scott.... the bizarre thing about the "silent" version is the drowning of Andy.... maybe it was in the book by Ferber (never read it)... but it seems odd

 

LaPlante is good as always but I never liked Schildkraut.

 

There's a great story about Marlene Dietrich at a party in the 30s and meeting Schildkraut.... he'd already won an Oscar.... and Dietrich shaked hands and says something like.... "Really darling, maybe if you change your name you'll amount to something."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm...wonder what she was referring to? That maybe he should have changed his name to Smith so people wouldn't know he was Jewish? Would she have said the same thing to his father Rudolph, also a prominant actor? Lots of anti-semitism back in those days, just as evil as racism against blacks. Could Marlene have been jealous because Joseph was the first non-American actor to win an Oscar as Best Actor in a Supporting Role for The Life of Emile Zola (1937), whereas Marlene, also a foreigner, never won an Oscar but was only nominated?

 

Joseph was a consummate professional. When his wife of almost 30 years died he went on to finish a performance in The Twilight Zone, ironically about an old man who refuses a young body so he can stay old with his wife.

 

They just don't make actors the caliber of Joseph Schildkraut anymore.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jill I think it was just a Dietrich snub since Schildkraut's father Rudolph was a well known actor in Germany. And while Joseph was never a major star in American films, he'd certainly been in films a long while.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Dietrich was an amazing film star, but she was not a nice person.... so it's not unexpected that she would diss Schildkraut, knowing full well who he was...

Link to post
Share on other sites

ElusivePimpernel,

 

Actually, it is quite good, a very nice print too. The talking sequences were shall we say ill-advised. Really poorly done. Very equatable to the tacked on dialogue scenes in Michael Curtiz NOAH'S ARK. Those spoiled, what could have been a great film. SHOW BOAT is not quite up to that standard, but still a highly entertaining film. Well worth watching just for Laura La Plante. Harry Pollard, who also Directed UNCLE TOM'S CABIN (1927), does very well with the Silent portion of the production. I will write a review later in the week.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think despite any problems with the film technically what stands out is the sweetness and intensity of the relationship between Guy and Magnolia in this version. They are young people and they look it. The later versions really had to dress down the actors to make them look young and to me at least the chemistry wasn't as strong between the leads in those later films as it is between Laura and Joseph in this version. I can overlook many technical faults when I am watching great performances! The ending in this one is sublime. They play the tune Lonesome Road while a beautiful and bittersweet reunion scene goes on. I tear up everytime. In fact I would include it as one of the most memorable endings in silent film history.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...