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Guest son, jery

The Sexiest!

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Guest son, jery

George Brent should be added to our Sexiest Hall of Fame. I thought he was a gorgeous hunk in "Baby Face", basically because he didn't wear his moustache. And he looked so tall, too. No wonder he was catnip to Babs, Bette and every female star he worked with. Ruth Chatterton married him, I believe, after they filmed a daring pre-coder, "FEMALE, where she goes through all the men in her company, just like Babs did in BABY FACE. Brent was also hotly pursued by all the gay directors, producers, etc. They had no chance. Brent was a fighting Irishmen but he was reportedly charming in his rejections.

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Guest o, rita

Ooh, I agree Jery. He was so handsome and suave. Bette Davis said he was her favorite leading man. He was the ultimate gentleman. He oozed class. But, did he ever get to "star" in a movie where he was the protaganist? And, what happned to him? Is he still alive?

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Guest o, rita

This is a continuation of above post. I think George had a lot of the same qualities of William Powell. But, he was not promoted by the studio. He should have been a star of the same caliber. I guess George wasn't as ambitious or agressive. Maybe, he was like Robert Taylor; he did whatever MGM wanted him to do and never bucked the studio. He was a "company man" type star. In fact, wasn't Robert under contract to the studio longer then anyone. Right up until the old studio system collapsed. I mean, he snitched to the HUAC/and that snake, Joe McCarthy, and about his peers.

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Guest pert, ud

I think William Warren or maybe Warren Williams would have been better. But Warren William? It sounds like he just dropped his last name and kept the first and middle (admittedly, still an improvement).

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Guest Alix

Agreed (like I do with most things you write, except that stuff about Nelson Eddy!). I think I called him William Warren for months, and then was looking up something on the imdb and saw that I had his name backward. It just doesn't "flow" easily off the tongue. Shakespere put it well when he said, "A rose by any name would smell as sweet."

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Guest son, jery

Rita, you really know your stuff, my friend. You're so right. Robert Taylor was a "yes" man for MGM but they did keep him in the running for a long time. He disgraced himself by appearing before the Joe McCarthy group and named some names, along with Adolph Menjou, Hedda Hopper and Elia Kazan. George Brent died a while back but from everything I read, he was ALWAYS the pursued. Bette complained in her memoirs that the black dye he used on his hair rubbed off on the pillows of her bed. This man really earned the title of Love God. He must've had something going for him.

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Guest o, rita

Yes, Jery, they say Hedda Hopper was to the "right of Hitler" she was extreme in her politics. I read that Hedda was almost personally responsible for Chaplin leaving the US. They say she constantly printed negative items about him in her column. She referred to him as a "pinko", and alleged he was a sexually perverted cradle robber. They say she could be a horrible woman. I remember her for her outlandish hats. When Elia Kazan received his award at the Academy Awards a few years back not everyone in the audience participated in the standing ovation. I recall Ed Harris and his actress wife remained seated. I know that they are both political activists. Not everyone in Hollywood has forgiven him for testifying against his peers some of whom were close friends. What a horrible episode in American history.

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Guest olmsted, l

I remember that Academy Awards show too. The one who stands out in my mind who stayed seated and lookind disdained was Nick Nolte. How does everyone else feel about the subject? Can you separate the man from his art?

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Guest son, jery

I think all the actors there should have boycotted Elia Kazan. In any other profession, it wouldn't have been as bad. But when you finally get a chance to appear before a Hollywood camera, especially back in the late 40s and early 50s, you're a member of a tiny little society of performers. When someone like Kazan names you, you're automatically blackballed with no work. Anne Revere was one. As the mother of Montgomery Clift in "A Place in the Sun," she had a juicy, big role. But after her name was merely MENTIONED by Kazan, her part was chopped down so much, it was like a cameo. She and all the other actors who were blackballed lived in poverty or worked at odd jobs until their deaths. A few screenwriters had to go overseas to find employment. Hedda, Adolph Menjou and Kazan were shameless hysterics and should have been run out of Hollywood.

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Guest olmsted, l

Jery, I can usually separate talent from an celebrity's personal life, though I know a LOT of people who can't do that. I know people who won't see certain movies if it stars someone who's politics they don't agree with. I can usually forget about what happens in life and enjoy a film regardless. However, since I wasn't alive in the 50's, I can't say I'd have been that way then. Charges from the HUAC were a VERY BIG DEAL, not some insignificant scandal that would soon be forgotten. I remember reading Lucille Ball's autobiography and she was accused of communism which was just ridiculous (though I know you don't like her). I know also that Arthur Miller was brought up on charges and Marilyn Monroe was being investigated. When Kazan named names Marilyn lost all respect for the man (rightfully so) with whom she had been so close and with whom she'd even had an affair. I think what Kazan did was disgusting and ugly and had I been around in the 50's, I probably would have boycotted him. However, 50 years later, I rent his movies (there are so many) and quite enjoy them.

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Guest pert, ud

Pardon, but did I hear another subtle sneer in there toward the great Nelson Eddy? There's been an awful lot of "unsexy" press around here toward Nelson and Jeanette. And don't think I've forgotten that you and Jery wouldn't invite Nelson to dinner (hey, at least you'd know he'd eat all his food. Johnny Mack Brown would be down on all fours, regurgitating). I think there's a predisposition to regard operetta performers as either "prima donnas" (if they're female) or "pompous ****" (if they're male). Well, I'll bet there's a lot of females who'd take Nelson Eddy's pompous **** over Johnny Mack Brown's Montana Moons. And nickname notwithstanding, they'd probably back The Singing Capon against Johnny Cow-Poke in a **** fight any day.

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Guest Alix

Ud pert, I have been called many things, but NEVER subtle! I'm afraid you're entirely correct on remembering that Nelson Eddy would not be a table guest at my dinner party. In fact, I don't want him as a singing waiter at my party either! You probably don't believe it, but I personally do not feel a predisposition against operetta stars in general. I am a huge fan of Ramon Novarro in fact (now THERE'S a gorgeous tenor!). I loved him in CAT AND THE FIDDLE. Very energetic, very sexy, and oh so very, very handsome! Eddy simply did not have any sex appeal (that I can see), and yet continued to be cast time after time in a romantic leading man's role! He just happens to be one of the handful of actors that I cannot seem to discern any real reason that they were successful! One request...you pick on all the other men I find attractive, please don't start picking on my real "crush," James Stewart. I fall in love with him over and over again in practically every movie I see him in. Hmmm....wonder if he was a tenor?

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Guest o, rita

I can appreciate Elia Kazan's genious. But, I would have remained seated. In the neighborhood's I grew up in you did not snitch on your friends.

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Guest K, Sandy

Ok, naming names was reprehensible. But who was doing the blackballing? The guys holding the purse strings. Who is more to blame here?

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Guest pert, ud

It's not really you specifically, Alix, I just seem to see some biases against lyric singers sometimes, and both Nelson and Jeanette were very nice people. You've got to forgive me for being so ruthless against Johnny Mack Brown, it's just that he is the ultimate Star I Like To Dislike, because he is really the ONLY thirties actor I feel that way about, and it's so fun to pick on him. (I have a feeling that he would not be even slightly offended, either.) Now, if this were a sports forum, I'd be singing his praises, because he was really one of the great football players of his time. But where movies are concerned, your feelings about Eddy parallel mine where Brown is concerned to a tee. I do like David Manners, because he seems to have just those. Now, I would never insult James Stewart, so we're on even footing there. I think he actually was kind of a high baritone, and a rather pleasing singer at that--I've heard him warble in "Born To Dance" and "Pot O' Gold." I sometimes get a little too playful here in the playroom, so never take me too seriously! I need my pre-code pals.

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Guest Alix

WOW! I had no idea James Stewart sang on film! I've not seen either of the two movies you named, so I'll have to keep an eye peeled for them. I'd love to see him really sing, not just that "Buffalo gal can you come out tonight" thing from IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE. Why apologize for being playful? You've made this message board fun with your wit and diverse opinions. I was wondering what we ever did before you came here! I can't believe out of all the actors in the thirties you'd single out J.M.B. though, to be your ultimate Star You Love to Dislike. But I guess if I can have the opportunity to dislike Nelson Eddy, I'll allow you to dislike J.M.B. (although I can't understand it, he's such a cutie). I hope you don't take me too seriously either! I like to chat, and talk movies too, and disagreeing is part of the fun.

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Guest son, jery

Richard Carlson is another candidate for our Hall of Sexiest Stars! He wasn't heroically built but he was, indeed, handsome, trim, with an adorable tush and he did bare most of his flesh as a swimmer in numerous horror flicks of the 50s, especially "Creature from the Black Lagoon," "Tormented," etc. I loved that intelligent expression, especially when he wore his glasses, and then he casually climbed into a bathing suit. I thought he was adorable in "Hold That Ghost!" and really good in "The Little Foxes." I would dive into the water anytime--even with the creature swimming beneath me--if I knew the cutie pie known as Richard Carlson would answer my pitiful little screams.

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Guest walton, wes

I agree with you up until two points: 1)Betty Grable's was a dated beauty. Something that isn't very attractive by today's standards. 2)Rita Hayworth is for me in league with Marilyn on all points. She was a vulnerable, voluptuous beauty whose personal life and self esteem mirrored Monroe's. Each had one advantage over the other however, Hayworth's beauty is an archetype of today's image of beauty. Monroe's is of a different era. Monroe on the other hand had the trump-she died tragically and way too soon, a guarantee of superstardom. Hayworth had to live on and battle age and Alzheimer-the worst career move for any star.

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Guest pert, ud

Absolutely. I just worry sometimes that I get a little too critical with other people's favorites. But like you say, it's all in fun. If someone starts in on one of my own idols, I just smile, say "En garde!" and start dueling with the poison pen! Since there are so few thirties stars I dislike, I need to find them where I may, and old JMB is like a steer waiting for the branding. Alix, you really must catch "Born To Dance." I can't imagine going through life without ever seeing it. Jimmy sings a Cole Porter classic, "Easy To Love," and joins in on several others. He's a charmer, and has unexpectedly strong chemistry with Eleanor Powell. You know, Jimmy's first big exposure came in a Nelson Eddy movie! Stewart's second film was "Rose-Marie," and it was the first of his performances to get a wide audience. He acts his smallish part perfectly, and he went on to do some eleven or so more movies that year. (I hope you won't judge Nelson by that particular film, though. He is really out of it, and it's not a typical performance, though many have judged his entire career based on it.) Great Tahoe scenery.

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Guest walton, wes

The entire McCarthy era was an ordeal not in the nature of the nation. How Kazan, or Taylor dealt must be viewed in light of America in 1930's 40's. Nolte, Harris and those that didn't exist in the era are showing nothing more than their insulated views of their world and its past. To continue to condemn a man for a mistake that was understandable in the era is too harsh and shows thier own ignornace in spades. As a historian, I can say that those that stood up to McCarthy are to be admired but those that buckled are not villans-they were pawns, weak and fearful. Further, art must be separated from the moment to moment actions of the artist. Kazan collapsed to the extreme right, but he was a brave and daring, forward thinker. One moment does not wipe out his accomplishments.

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Guest Alix

Ud pert, I'd be interested to know who your favorites are, from the great 1930's.

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Guest son, jery

please, let's get back to our Sexiest Star theme. We can wade into the McCarthy Hearings in another folder. Okay, who do we have next on our Sexiest List? Buster Crabbe (Flash Gordon, Tarzan), Preston Foster (suave, menacing hunk of the 30s, 40s), House Peters (Gloria Swanson's favorite leading man and so macho!).

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Guest olmsted, l

Yummy Gary Cooper! He was SOOO cute in Meet John Doe, which I watched last night. Most of the movies I had seen him in were when he was older, still no slouch, but definately showing some wear and tear. But when he was younger....just delicious! :)

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Guest olmsted, l

Wes, although I agree with you on your points and would love to discuss this further, I agree with jeryson that we should do it in a different folder. I'll be happy to start the discussion if anyone's game. (?)

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Guest pert, ud

The musicals are my favorites. First the Keeler-Powells, then the Astaire-Rogers series, then the Eddy-MacDonalds, then the Bing Crosbys, then the Eleanor Powells, then the Sonja Henies, then all the other musicals, then the non-musical Warners, then MGM, then RKO, Paramount and so on. I love at least 99% of all movies made in the thirties. If I see a movie playing that was made in the thirties which I haven't seen, I know what I'm doing that night!

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