Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

The Patsy (1928)


Recommended Posts

zzzthepatsy1928.jpg?t=1240245351

 

 

A little reminder to those of us who don?t have a copy of The Patsy (1928) or who might not have seen Marion Davies at her comedic best. The film is scheduled to air at 4:30 AM/EST on Tuesday morning, so allow for your time zone difference when programming your VCR to record. Here are just a few reasons why TCM was right to include our Miss Marion in a tribute to the funny ladies of classic films.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A great comedy showcase for Davies..... the film also boasts Marie Dressler and Lawrence Gray.

 

Isn't the first photo posted here from *The Fair Co-Ed* ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn?t entirely certain about the scene in the first photo, but I am sure you must be right. I knew that it wasn?t from The Patsy, but I included the image because I think it shows Marion?s silly/goofy humor.

 

The Fair Co-Ed (1927)

 

zzzmariondavies5.jpg?t=1240254

 

Marion in a scene with Jane Winton, one of her co-stars in the film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty Jane Winton co-stars in both Davies films. She's the sister in *The Patsy* and the big rival in *The Fair Co-Ed,* another solid Davies comedy which has her playing college basketball! It's a hoot and co-stars Johnny Mack Brown as well as Joel McCrea and Lou Costello as extras!

 

I don't have a very good copy of the latter film, it's never been shown on TCM, but it seems it has been restored and was shown at a film festival on the west coast just last year.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Joel McCrea? I wouldn't mind seeing more of Joel McCrea's very early films. I knew he was in The Jazz Age (1929) along with Doug Fairbanks, Jr. and others, but that was all I knew about his career in silent films. I also knew he was in some early sound film with Dorothy MacKaill (Doug, Jr. was also in The Barker (1928) with her), as well as The Most Dangerous Game (1932) with Fay Wray and Bird Of Paradise (1932) with Dolores Del Rio. Did you see that his son died on Thursday, April 16?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just viewed the Marion Davies TCM Special today. I missed it when it first aired, so picked

up DVD in trade. Have a much greater appreciation of her as a person, as well as her talent.

I only have Patsy, Red Mill, Show People and Blondie of the Follies. Will make a point of

viewing all again, plus see if I can trade for more of her titles. She was a very remarkable

and misunderstood person , primarily because of a fictional character in Citizen Kane.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I find it interesting that you mention Marion and the Citizen Kane connection for two reasons. I understand that Orson Welles expressed regret for the way in which he depicted Marion's character in the film, and he also seems to have considered her a good friend. I also think that every actress who has portrayed Marion in a film seems to take her cue from the Welles' film, rather than researching Marion's life or, perhaps, even watching her films (the worst offenders shall not be named). I think the result has been an entirely unfair representation of her life and career.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For all the rotten reviews and snide comments behind her back, Davies remained a class act. She certainly wasn't perfect but I've never read of any rotten comments Davies made about anyone (including MGM rivals Norma Shearer and Joan Crawford) no matter what the situation. Davies was a remarkable talent, a shrewd business woman, a noted philanthropist, and a loyal friend. I believe the Marion Davies Clinic (which she built in 1952) is still part of the UCLA Medical Center. The Marion Davies Foundation was founded to battle children's diseases.

 

Who knows how (or if) her reputation as an actress would be any better today if she had gotten the big roles she wanted so badly, like Elizabeth Barrett Browning or Marie Antoinette (both went to Shearer).

 

The biggest tease of her career came after she had retired from films and friend George Bernard Shaw wanted her to star with Leslie Howard (Davies and Howard starred in *Five and Ten* in which she is excellent) in *Pygmalion* as Eliza. Shaw knew that Davies (although far too old for the part by 1938) would give the role the right comedic pitch and not let the story turn romantic or glamorous (which it was never meant to be). Davies would have had a ball with the Cockney accent as well as the posh talk.

 

I have every Davies film that still exists, except for *It's a Wise Child, Yolanda,* and a few others that survive only in remnants. The first two are packed away in vaults and will likely never be seen again.

 

Message was edited by: drednm

 

Message was edited by: drednm

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't need to record THE PATSY, I recorded it each of the first three times it aired on TCM.. The first broadcast was in 2003 I believe. This morning will be probably about the sixth time at least that they have run it. still hoping to obtain a copy of the Photoplay version with the Maude Nilssen score sometime.

 

Kind of sad that THE RED MILL and SHOW PEOPLE are not a part of the festival.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...