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The divine Edgar....


Sepiatone
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Apologies to Humbert Humbert, but I'm not referring to Edgar Alan Poe, but rather....

EDGAR BUCHANAN.

I'll admit my first awareness of Edgar was his stint as Uncle Joe, who's "moving kind of slow" on PETTICOAT JUNCTION in the mid '60's.  I probably saw him in old movies over the years before the TV show, but no doubt wasn't really paying attention.  But over the last couple or so years, in watching old western shows on MeTV, and ANTENNATV and such, noticed him in several of the same shows playing different people, like a few RIFLEMAN shows in which he was the original DOC BARRIGE, and then later a couple of other different guys.  

And on two different PERRY MASON shows, he was once a small town judge, and in another a prosecuting attorney in a different small town.  And more recently, hearing his voice as a police dispatcher in one of those "Crime Doesn't Pay" shorts, and a role in the early '40's flick TALK OF THE TOWN.  And then noticing him among the crew in THE SEA HAWK.

The first time I noticed he did other acting BEFORE the TV show was when I finally( not until halfway through high school) saw SHANE.  This man's done a LOT that I wasn't previously aware of.  And there were of course, many times he showed excellence in his craft in several roles.  Surely, both underrated and appreciated.

Thoughts?

Sepiatone

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Two performances standout for me:

In "Penny Serenade" (!941) he was Applejack the helpful friend of new parents Irene Dunne and Cary Grant. Most memorable for the scene where he helps Dunne out with bathing the baby.

"Ride The High Country" (1962) he played a drunken judge who makes a big mistake when he angers a gang of psychos after he performs a wedding ceremony.

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I love the fact there's a thread about Edgar Buchanan.

Screen Shot 2018-08-12 at 12.37.01 PM.jpg

I've been watching Tales of Wells Fargo on Starz. There was a really excellent one that featured Edgar Buchanan as a guest star. The plot referenced an earlier story, which made me think this was not his first time on the show playing the same character. So I looked on the IMDb and sure enough he did six different episodes of Wells Fargo as that character. He was so good I can see why they kept asking him back. What a wonderful scene stealer. He's just so professional, so perfect in his line deliveries, he really gets the character across and makes it fun.

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Yea,  nice to see Edgar Buchanan get a shout out;    Just saw him on an episode of Wagon Train where he played a rich land owner similar to the bad-guy in Shane.    (Edgar was also one of the homesteaders in Shane).   

In his early years he was under contract with Columbia and did a few films with Jean Arthur; Too Many Husbands,  Arizona and The Talk of the Town.    He shines in these.

He also was in many films with Columbia star Glenn Ford;  Texas, which also cast a young Bill Holden, Lust for Gold with Ida Lupino,  the noirs Framed with Janis Carter and Human Desire with Gloria Grahame.

Buchanan was also in a bunch of lower budget westerns for Universal and Republic.  

All of that before becoming a familiar face on T.V. shows.

 

 

 

 

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Divine? I might be more apt to call him King of the Cracker Barrel, making folk=wisdom decrees from a creeky rocking chair on a platform adjacent to the General Store, and he has the perfect cracker-barrel voice to do it. But what's the difference, as King he would have Divine Right (informally, of course) and would reign unencumbered. In Texas (1941) he played a dentist so scary it might make one fall in love with a toothache. I only recently discovered that he was a dentist in real life early on. I hope he went to dental school.

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Edgar Buchanan has a nice role in The Sea of Grass as the cook on Spencer Tracy's ranch. He provides the kindness and understanding that Tracy doesn't. The Sea of Grass is better than its reputation, with an excellent story and fine supporting performances by Edgar Buchanan, Melvyn Douglas, Ruth Nelson, and Robert Walker.

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11 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Apologies to Humbert Humbert, but I'm not referring to Edgar Alan Poe, but rather....

Of course, if there WAS a thread about Edgar Allen Poe, mention would have to be made of Jeffrey "Re-Animator" Combs doing some of the most dead-on biographic portrayals of Edgar's troubled Maryland absinthe-drinking ne'er-do-well days--Most notably in a Showtime "Masters of Horror" episode as well as onstage:

 

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6 hours ago, laffite said:

 In Texas (1941) he played a dentist so scary it might make one fall in love with a toothache. I only recently discovered that he was a dentist in real life early on. I hope he went to dental school.

He did ... North Pacific Dental College in Portland (Oregon) 

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7 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

He did ... North Pacific Dental College in Portland (Oregon) 

Yes, since he was a dentist in real life, I would expect so. That was supposed to be a gag. But the character in Texas, I don't think  he did, ha.

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12 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Two performances standout for me:

In "Penny Serenade" (!941) he was Applejack the helpful friend of new parents Irene Dunne and Cary Grant. Most memorable for the scene where he helps Dunne out with bathing the baby.

"Ride The High Country" (1962) he played a drunken judge who makes a big mistake when he angers a gang of psychos after he performs a wedding ceremony.

The last time I saw Penny Serenade, I was kinda struck by this bathing scene where a very real, very young baby is being bathed by the actors. I kind of wondered whose kid it was and how agreeable the parents were to the situation. Did they get paid? Or did the director just yell out "Find me a baby!" and they just grabbed somebody? The kind of permission one has to go through for this sort of thing I'm sure is infinitely more stringent now than it was then.

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1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

The kind of permission one has to go through for this sort of thing I'm sure is infinitely more stringent now than it was then.

Absolutely. The parents would want millions. But because of the competition they might drop to a hundred or two.

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Well, the "divine" WAS intended as a play on the words Humbert Humbert used to describe Poe in the movie "Lolita".  

But thinking of BUCHANAN as being "divine" works for me too.

I do too, remember when watching that first episode of "Petticoat Junction" my mom and Dad saying something like, Oh, is THAT guy still around?" or words to that effect.  And upon inquiring, was informed by them that he was one of those guys you see in a LOT of old movies, my familiarity with the term "character actor" not a realization in 1963, when I was 12.  ;)  And over the years I'd learn that MANY of the show's cast members had a rich history in a few different areas of entertainment.  But also, I realized quickly that show character FLOYD SMOOT, played by RUFE DAVIS was the same guy that recorded my favorite record when I was a little kid, an old 78rpm disc of a song called "The Old Sow Song", the "B" side of "The Little Engine That Could", a recording I can't find much (if any) information on, but came to realize that Rufe probably provided all the sound effects himself (  ;) ) and was likely recorded sometime in the 1940's.  And I always found it strange that a man would be named "Suzannah" ( "Suzannah's a funny old man(snort!), man( phttt!), hi-diddle-dan"(tweet!) )

And true, Edgar WAS real good at portraying boastful blowhards, and in watching now all those old "Petticoat" reruns on DECADES, figured most of the "oldsters" in the cast( Edgar, Davis, Burnette, Cady and Benaderet ) must have had a FINE time between scenes recalling old tales of earlier Hollywood.  Especially when the venerable CHARLES LANE would show up as the recurring character,  sourpuss HOMER BEDLOE of the train company that supposedly owned The Cannonball.  ;)

Sepiatone

 

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20 hours ago, NipkowDisc said:

I thought this thread might be about Edgar G. Ulmer.

:D

 

Heh....was unfamiliar with the name, but in doing some quick research, the only films this guy directed that I've seen were BLUEBEARD and CARNEGIE HALL.  Neither one of them "great shakes" as far as movies go.  ;)

Sepiatone

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On 8/12/2018 at 7:19 AM, Sepiatone said:

Apologies to Humbert Humbert, but I'm not referring to Edgar Alan Poe, but rather....

EDGAR BUCHANAN.

I'll admit my first awareness of Edgar was his stint as Uncle Joe, who's "moving kind of slow" on PETTICOAT JUNCTION in the mid '60's.  I probably saw him in old movies over the years before the TV show, but no doubt wasn't really paying attention.  But over the last couple or so years, in watching old western shows on MeTV, and ANTENNATV and such, noticed him in several of the same shows playing different people, like a few RIFLEMAN shows in which he was the original DOC BARRIGE, and then later a couple of other different guys.  

And on two different PERRY MASON shows, he was once a small town judge, and in another a prosecuting attorney in a different small town.  And more recently, hearing his voice as a police dispatcher in one of those "Crime Doesn't Pay" shorts, and a role in the early '40's flick TALK OF THE TOWN.  And then noticing him among the crew in THE SEA HAWK.

The first time I noticed he did other acting BEFORE the TV show was when I finally( not until halfway through high school) saw SHANE.  This man's done a LOT that I wasn't previously aware of.  And there were of course, many times he showed excellence in his craft in several roles.  Surely, both underrated and appreciated.

Thoughts?

Sepiatone

I adore him! Wasn't he a dentist originally? Maybe he would talk people out of feeling pain, instead of giving them novocaine when he drilled for cavities. Just a natural and so amusing!

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I was thinking of Edgar Winter, though I never thought he was divine. The other

Edgar appeared in a lot of TV westerns, usually playing a charming but somewhat

dishonest and fast talking though still slow moving con artist.

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On 8/12/2018 at 6:10 PM, EricJ said:

Of course, if there WAS a thread about Edgar Allen Poe, mention would have to be made of Jeffrey "Re-Animator" Combs doing some of the most dead-on biographic portrayals of Edgar's troubled Maryland absinthe-drinking ne'er-do-well days--Most notably in a Showtime "Masters of Horror" episode as well as onstage:

 

 Gotcha.

I thought this was a thread about the Divine--

quote The Raven--

"Nevermore"

Edgar Allan Poe.

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