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annelovestcm

yuck a whole weekend of WAR movies

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They showed *On the Town* and *Anchors Away* on the Sunday night of Memorial Day Weekend last year as part of the Frank Sinatra Star of the Month festival.

 

I believe the war canteen musicals aired on Veterans' Day.

 

I'm surprised you're not complaining about the lack of *The Clock* or *Judgment at Nuremberg* in this year's Memorial Day schedule. ;-)

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I wasn't actually complaining -- although war movies aren't my favorite genre by any means, I think its appropriate (and respectful) that TCM program them this weekend.

 

And if any of you have never seen it, the movie *The Dam-Busters* is on tonight, and it is a real gem.

 

(I'll even put my *Presenting Lily Mars* DVD on pause to catch that one again!).

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My own personal feelings about having a three-day holiday weekend showcasing war films is all-together appropriate, especially in these times of war.

 

In years past I think the showing of war films may not have meant as much. But with on-going operations in the middle east, I think it is entirely correct to show these films.

 

Memorial Day weekend has always been about the beginning of summer. Many Americans either choose not to remember our men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice or they do. In the former, if they happen upon a war film being shown on TCM, and it makes them reflect about our men and women who have given their lives for the freedoms we take for granted, then I think that is good. If they don't and they go about their business "as usual", then that is sad.

 

Yesterday afternoon I watched with awe the one great American film about defeat, "They Were Expendable". A film made to show what Americans and Filipinos HAD to go through in those dark early months of the Pacific war. Last night I enjoyed watching "A Walk in the Sun". A very enjoyable film about the daily life of the typical American infantry man. Excellent story and dialogue.

 

This morning I had HBO on and they showed their excellent "Taking Chance" film about the true story of a Marine colonel escorting the body of a dead soldier home. Kevin Bacon was excellent in the role. I sat there thinking about all of the service men and women who have given their lives for the freedoms we hold so dear, and the tears were just streaming down my face.

 

I then thought about my dad and my uncle (both deceased now) that gave all they had during WWII. Both were in the Pacific and both saw limited action. My uncle was a sergeant in the Army and was stationed at Hickam Airfield during the attack on Pearl Harbor. I remember his stories and how scary it must have been for him to go through at such a young age. I then remembered how I felt at the age of 23 and how I had to deal with life and my challenges. Nothing of what I had to go through at 23 could compare to what he saw and witnessed.

 

My dad was an aircraft machanic on board the carrier Wasp in the SW Pacific. He was on board when the carrier was hit by torpedoes on September 15th, 1942. He told me that he was scared by what had happened to his ship, but that everyone with the damage control and rescue parties were so professional in getting the men off the carrier that he really did not think too much about being scared.

 

He later served on the carrier Lake Champlain.

 

Remembering their stories made me realize that because of what they had to endure during WWII along with the millions of other Americans who served their country, made me think that if all TCM did was show war movies during the Memorial Day weekend, that that in itself might just make someone realize the sacrifices that Americans have made throughout the history of our great nation. And that is very important to the current younger generation who in many cases have NO idea what people like my father and uncle did for our country.

 

And I think that by watching these films or if someone like AnneLovesTCM doesn't much care for war films happens to watch one or at least part of one, then in a small way maybe they can then appreciate the sacrifice of those who have gone before us to help preserve our liberty and allow us to enjoy a wonderful three day holiday.

 

Edited by Fxreyman

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I for one am quite pleased with the war lineup, because we always watch a war movie or two on memorial day. it's a great way to remember those brave men who sacrificed their lives and futures so we could have the freedom to make posts like this.

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War is not my favorite movie subject and I think that three days of wartime movies can be rather depressing. I expect to watch one or two on Memorial Day, but I don't think I can watch 72 hours of war.

 

Please understand that just because I don't like to watch war, does not mean that I don't support our troops, and I don't need to watch a war movie to remember that they are sacrificing their lives for our freedoms.

 

Oh, and let's not forget the women who have given their lives for this country. Too bad movies such as Three Came Home or So Proudly We Hail! are not in the TCM line-up this weekend.

 

Hope everyone has a safe and pleasant holiday weekend.

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Yes, but I don't know of one woman who enjoys watching 'War' films

it seems to me it is a male pastime...why not show films like

Since You Went Away or Best Years of our Lives ?

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> {quote:title=RainingViolets101 wrote:}{quote}

> Yes, but I don't know of one woman who enjoys watching 'War' films

> it seems to me it is a male pastime...why not show films like

> Since You Went Away or Best Years of our Lives ?

 

I would rank both those films in the War genre. War films are not always about battle, but focus on many aspects such as the home front or readjustment.

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As Fedya said, TCM played On The Town last year on the night before Memorial Day; I remember that clearly because I watched it and enjoyed it!

 

Honestly, I think it's wonderful that TCM pays homage to those who died by showing these films. It would be an insult if they didn't. After all, we should be proud of our relatives who fought for us, my grandpa included, God bless his resting soul.

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I agree with RainingViolets, if it must be a weekend of war films, couldn't we have less of the battlefield and more of the home front?

 

Both of my grandfathers, my dad, and all my uncles served in the US military during wartime - I love, respect and admire them for what they gave and what they sacrificed. However...

 

I imagine Anne, like me, went to her DVR or DVD collection for the films she's watched this weekend.

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> {quote:title=annelovestcm wrote:}{quote}

> yuck a whole weekend of WAR movies

 

To paraphrase Frankenstein's Monster:

 

War: bad. War movies: good.

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Well it might have been a bad weekend for some but a *great* Tuesday Morning! TCM is *finally* showing King Vidor's "The Big Parade". It took them long enough! Recording it at present.

 

Thank you TCM!! (this movie looks similiar to another one)

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I must be the exception to the rule then, because I'm a chick and I LOVE war movies. I particularly enjoyed watching The Dirty Dozen again, and wish they'd watch the great escape. But I would agree that a few Homefront war movies would have been great to watch, too, perhaps to break it up.

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I was also hoping TCM would show *Since You Went Away*, but I have to admit I enjoyed a movie that I had never seen before called *Above and Beyond* with Robert Taylor.

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>LP wrote:

>I must be the exception to the rule then, because I'm a chick and I LOVE war movies.

 

I bet there are more than you but they are not willing to admit it...

 

I knew a few who could tell you about battle strategies and mistakes made in those battles and they were very feminine with the lights out...

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*I bet there are more than you but they are not willing to admit it*

 

Jake,

 

You know I am willing to admit it.

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ABOVE AND BEYOND is a favorite of mine (made by, of all people, the comedy-writing and directing team of Norman Panama and Melvin Frank), and embodies much of what I really like in a movie: an intimate story set against momentous events.

 

Though I've never been much of a fan of Robert Taylor's (I do like a couple of his historical films -- in spite of his being in them, not because of it), his woodenness is well suited to the bottled-up emotions of Paul Tibbetts that the story requires and centers on. He also bore a striking physical resemblance to the real Tibbetts (who died last year).

 

Then there's the wonderful music by composer Hugo Friedhofer, written very much in the style of his Oscar-winning breakthrough score to William Wyler's THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (one of whose characters also served in the war on bomber planes), that serves to further sharpen the drama and character conflicts. The film does deserve to be better known.

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CineSage, you beat me to it. While I was composing this reply, the TCM boards "bombed out" again.

 

Above and Beyond is a film that flies below the radar (no pun intended). I first saw it on TNT in the late 1980s. Having previously done some reading about the bombing of Hiroshima, I was curious what Hollywood would do with the story.

 

The filmmakers essentially got the details of the mission correct, right down to the Enola Gay banking to the side after it dropped the bomb. I could have done without the romantic subplot (although Eleanor Parker always looks good), but I realize it makes the viewer feel for Paul Tibbets and the pressure he is undergoing. Robert Taylor, as Tibbets, does a fine job. I especially like the scene near the end of the film, when a reporter says his viewers would like to know how Tibbets felt. "How do they feel about it?" Taylor growls. James Whitmore, as Major Uanna, also stands out.

 

Toss in another winning score by Hugo Friedhofer and some good aerial footage, and you have a solid movie.

 

MGM had previously told part of the story in 1947, under the title The Beginning or the End. Some of the aerial footage from Above and Beyond is taken from this movie. This film shows up on TCM on occasion, and is worth seeing. However, I prefer Above and Beyond.

 

By the way, don't confuse The Beginning or the End with Beginning _of_ the End, in which giant grasshoppers invade Chicago. The latter film is a special kind of bomb.

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>Izcutter wrote:

>You know I am willing to admit it.

 

You are right about Stonewall's guerilla tactics, too...

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> {quote:title=scsu1975 wrote:}{quote}

> CineSage, you beat me to it. While I was composing this reply, the TCM boards "bombed out" again.

>

> Above and Beyond is a film that flies below the radar (no pun intended). I first saw it on TNT in the late 1980s. Having previously done some reading about the bombing of Hiroshima, I was curious what Hollywood would do with the story.

>

> The filmmakers essentially got the details of the mission correct, right down to the Enola Gay banking to the side after it dropped the bomb. I could have done without the romantic subplot (although Eleanor Parker always looks good), but I realize it makes the viewer feel for Paul Tibbets and the pressure he is undergoing. Robert Taylor, as Tibbets, does a fine job. I especially like the scene near the end of the film, when a reporter says his viewers would like to know how Tibbets felt. "How do they feel about it?" Taylor growls. James Whitmore, as Major Uanna, also stands out.

>

> Toss in another winning score by Hugo Friedhofer and some good aerial footage, and you have a solid movie.

>

> MGM had previously told part of the story in 1947, under the title The Beginning or the End. Some of the aerial footage from Above and Beyond is taken from this movie. This film shows up on TCM on occasion, and is worth seeing. However, I prefer Above and Beyond.

>

> By the way, don't confuse The Beginning or the End with Beginning _of_ the End, in which giant grasshoppers invade Chicago. The latter film is a special kind of bomb.

 

If anything, the bomber group's training for the bomb drop is the major subplot; the strains on the Tibbetses' marriage is really what the film's about, but because of the profound cause-and-effect linkage between the former and the latter, they're so closely intertwined as to be inseparable. The former couldn't be told without the latter, and the latter would be a lot less interesting without the former (as other movies about the subject have been).

 

There was a lot of guesswork done on the part of the MGM art department, as many of the details surrounding the appearance of the bomb and its trigger mechanism was still highly classified as of 1952. The bomb didn't look anything like the "Little Boy" device actually dropped on Hiroshima (the bomb dropped on Nagasaki three days later looked different, too), and the arming mechanism inserted into the bomb in flight by Capt. Parsons was utterly fanciful, though accurate historically.

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