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Can you do it? Favorite Film in each Decade and Why? 20's to Present Day.


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> {quote:title=Ezzo wrote:}{quote}

> It's not the best representation of the work. Just entertaining on it's own and was filmed for the most part in New York on location which hadn't really been done before that for musical films. The difficulty of filming outside a sound stage must have been overwhelming. Also, Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra. I appreciate your opinion.

 

That's a great point, Ezzo. I don't know how the film version would compare to the original stage production, but there's simply nothing that can compare to the sights and sounds of the authentic location footage showing what NYC looked like in the mid-20th century.

 

There would be many other later musicals that would make great use of location shooting, from South Pacific to West Side Story, but On the Town did it first. And they did it their way. ;)

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> {quote:title=gagman66 wrote:}{quote}

> I just can't believe that No one else has picked *THE BIG PARADE.* Literally Puts many so called and undeservedly better known classic films to utter shame. Not just silent films. Truly a landmark movie.

 

I haven't had a chance to watch my recording yet!! I am so sorry gagman. I promise to watch it soon.

 

For whatever reason, the other films I mentioned are the ones I am more familiar with. But I think that The Big Parade will probably go straight to the top of my 20's favorites soon after I have watched it.

 

I'd have liked to watch it much sooner, but since TCM didn't play it for so many years... :(

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HollywoodGolightly,

 

I didn't know that you had not seen the film before; Here are a couple of interesting posts lifted from some people that I don't know, on a different forum after the recent broadcast. Hope they don't mind me doing this?

 

**"Yesterday I watched on TCM The Big Parade (1925), and I found myself after watching it crying at the end of the film. I don't really cry over a romantic picture, but embarrassingly I did. That was honestly a romantic movie (with drama of war) and its now my favorite film ever!!! John Gilbert in this movie is soooooooo handsome! OH my he is. The war scenes where sad and vivid to watch for a film made in '25. Especially with many soldiers dying one at a time when they were walking closer to the enemy. So sad. :( I thought this movie is a great romance drama to watch as a silent. One of the best."*

 

*Posted By brittney87*

 

 

*I totally agree with Giantman, regarding The Big Parade!*

 

*"Another reason it is one pf my favorites is that it has some of everything; drama, comedy, romance, tragedy and even nudity, although not the type that is usually found in films today.*

 

*I also adore Renee Adoree! I love the chemistry between her and Jack Gilbert! I wish that, in La Boheme, Renee had been Mimi, opposite Gilbert. I also loved her in The Mating Call! I thought Thomas Meighan was a little too old for his role, and really wasn't that crazy about the parts of the story other than the romance, but watched it over and over, just for Renee!*

 

*posted by noelani*

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> {quote:title=gagman66 wrote:}{quote}

> HollywoodGolightly,

>

> I didn't know that you had not seen the film before; Here are a couple of interesting posts lifted from some people that I don't know, on a different forum after the recent broadcast. Hope they don't mind me doing this?

 

Thank you for sharing those posts, gagman. I've not seen the whole movie before, but I have seen quite a few clips over the years in documentaries and I've always had a very high opinion of the movie. And I continue to hope the restored version will become available on DVD, or be shown on TCM.

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HollywoodGolightly,

 

I wanted to post this earlier too. Comments from my friend Karin (Whistlinggypsy) at my page on the Golden Age of Hollywood. Had trouble accessing the site. But I have it now. I also just joined TCM film union. It took me a long while to finish registering, but I finally succeeded. I transported my recent blog from GAOH on *THE BIG PARADE* over to the new site. Here are Karin's comments which she has not posted here. Though I had hoped that she would do so:

 

 

*You said that you were interested in my comments on The Big Parade; I have had a chance to watch the film and I am planning to watch it again. I don?t know that I can add anything original to all the glowing reviews that this film deserves, but I found the story profoundly moving and a fitting tribute to the memory of those who fought and died in the war. I think the chemistry between Gilbert, Dane and O?Brien added a bittersweet touch to their wartime friendship, and the romance between Gilbert and Ren?e Ador?e was breathtaking and heartbreaking. I?m not an expert on directors of any era, but King Vidor certainly ranks among the best of the silent era. His camera work and story telling techniques were innovative and captures the viewer?s heart and imagination. What can I say? I found myself crying more than half a dozen times. Speaking of King Vidor, I watched the documentary on TCM last night and I was really annoyed by a mistake that even I (with my limited knowledge) knew was WRONG: the narrator claimed that The Crowd starred Vidor?s wife, actress Florence Vidor. Doesn?t anyone fact check these films before they are released? The film starred his wife, Eleanor Boardman . . . sheesh. I found a similar error in a book on art direction that claimed Dolores Del Rio was married to Van Nest Polglase, when in fact she was married to Cedric Gibbons. I suppose their editors phoned in ill that day.*

 

*wishing you all the best,*

 

*~Karin~*

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10's: *Birth of a Nation*

Yes, I know it's controversial but Griffith helped develop the art of story telling and there is no denying that this is, not only a milestone of American film history, but storytelling in such as way that had not been seen before and influenced all that came after.

 

20's: *Robin Hood*

Doug Fairbanks, Sr. I'll say it till I'm blue in face, nobody put their love of making movies up there on the screen the way Doug did. When paired with Allen Dwan, the best of silent film making.

 

30's: *Stagecoach*

Yeah, we all know the premise, group of people put in peril (ie the disaster flick), this is the grand-daddy of them all. And that introduction shot of Wayne, priceless.

 

40's: *Casablanca*

Because it all amounts to hill a beans if she gets on the plane with the wrong man. Bogie makes sure it means a great deal more than that and gets a friendship with Claude Rains instead.

 

50's: *The Searchers*

Because Ethan Edwards may be one of the darkest characters of American film. Credit both Ford and Wayne for making this film a fascinating look at the dark side of obsession. Added bonus, the various homages by modern directors to this western masterpiece.

 

60's: *To Kill a Mockingbird*

Never has the backlot at Universal felt so universal. And Atticus is who the majority of us wish we could be.

 

70's: *The Godfather*

At its heart, the story of a family. In reality, the story of America assimilation both good and evil. The Don wants only the best for his youngest son, Michael. What he gets is the underside of the American Dream.

 

80's: *The Right Stuff*

Because "without bucks, no Buck Rogers" and at the end of the day, Chuck Yeager really is the top of the pyramid. A wonderful look back at the space race, its fun, its frivolity and its toll.

 

90's: *Cinema Paradiso*

The final montage is the biggest valentine to the history of cinema. Ever. I dare you to watch it and not be puddle of tears by the end.

 

00's: *Batman Begins*

Best reboot of a franchise. Ever.

 

Runners up:

10's: *Intolerance*

Big, epic, religious and yet has the power to move us on many different levels.

 

20's: *The Iron Horse*

John Ford really invents the cinematic western and spends the rest of his career expanding upon it while others spend theirs trying to measure up to it.

 

30's: *Beau Geste*

William Wellman. Enough said. The auteur theory left him behind. This one reminds us that many of the auteurs contemporaries were just as talented.

 

40's: *Double Indemnity*

Billy Wilder looks at the underbelly of what drives our desires and delivers a tour-du-force that still has us talking sixty years later.

 

50's: *Sunset Blvd*

"It's the pictures that got small." A terrifying look at the underbelly of Hollywood. Swanson deserved the Oscar.

 

60's: (tie) *The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance*

The most elegiac western Ford made. A memory play about the dark side of myth. Have fun peeling away the layers of the various characters. When you do, you'll be astounded at the depth that lies beneath the surface.

 

and *The Wild Bunch*

Modernizes the Western for the post-Vietnam generation. But at its heart, it's the story of a band of men who have out-grown their time. Without Ford, Hawks, Mann and a few others, this film would not strike the deep chord it does. Forget the violence and concentrate on the broken friendship between Pike (William Holden) and Thorton (Robert Ryan) as well as Pike's relationship to Dutch (Ernie Borgnine). That's at the heart of this film. Back off to what, indeed.

 

70's: *The Godfather Part II*

Michael Corleone succumbs to the dark side of power and in the end it is devastating to see how far he falls.

 

80's: *Who Framed Roger Rabbit*

The biggest animated valentine, ever.

 

90's: *LA Confidential*

Because we like to think we know the history of the Los Angeles and we like to think that justice prevails. "Forget it, Jake, it's Chinatown".

 

00's: *Gladiator*

Don't ask why but I will stop what I am doing to watch this film. An update on the Sand and Sandal genre as well as "Spartacus" but incredibly watchable.

 

Message was edited by: lzcutter because words matter

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The twenties...????

 

The Thirties...Mr Smith Goes to Washington...James Stewart gives a fine performance and gets to Claude Rains' conscience...power and politics...

 

The Forties...Red River...John Wayne...nuf said...

 

The Fifties...Ben Hur...Charlton Heston and the chariot race...I'll never forget...

 

The Sixties...The Sand Pebbles...Steve McQueen's finest performance as Jake Holman and Richard Crenna is underrated in his fine performance, too. Very underrated movie...

 

The Seventies...Patton...George C Scott portrays the general as no else could and the entire picture reeks in realism.

 

The Eighties...The Road Warrior...Mel Gibson and his dog in a fight for survival...maybe a harbinger of the future...

 

The nineties...Unforgiven...Clint Eastwood, Morgan Freeman and Gene Hackman in an unforgettable Western and redemption at its endning.

 

2000's...Seabiscuit...Tobey Maguire as a gritty underdog with a horse who inspired a nation during the Depression. Great human interest story, too...

 

Message was edited by: JakeHolman

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If this isn't an impossible thread! Haha. There's no way on Earth I can pick an absolute favorite, so I shall just pick one of my favorites from each decade :)

 

*20's-* Metropolis (It's just so dang thought provoking and captivating!)

*30's-* Jezebel (Bette Davis. I needn't really say more.)

*40's-* The Lady Eve (So freaking sexy.)

*50's-* A Streetcar Named Desire (Too many reasons.)

*60's-* Breakfast at Tiffany's (The ultimate Audrey flick.)

*70's-* Young Frankenstein (What's not to love about it?! The laughs never end with this one.)

*80's-* The Terminator (This just defines 80's action/sci-fi for me.)

*90s-* Forrest Gump (Classic.)

*00's-* Batman Begins (This is the film that gave Batman back his dignity! I am forever grateful to Chris Nolan and all involved in the making of it because if they had left Batman and Robin as my last memory of the dark knight I would have murdered George Clooney.)

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Yay, Mizzini, you're back! I haven't seen you around here for months!!!!

 

I was thinking about you (wow, does that sound creepy!!!! ;-) ) the other day. I was wondering how everything was going since the hurricanes...

 

Well, welcome back! And, I hope you will be able to stick around for a while!

 

-Millie

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Ah, Millie dear! I was strangely thinking about you the other day too! See, I was watching Only Angels Have Wings last night and I thought to myself, "Self, I wonder how good 'ol ILRM is doin' on them TCM message boards." Haha. I just had to come and see what was new and see if you were still even here! I had forgotten all about these boards until last night when I finally turned TCM on again. I have been so busy lately with so many things that TCM was just left in the dust. I am getting back into the swing of things now though and hope to be spending some more time here :)

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> {quote:title=Ezzo wrote:}{quote}

> "It's also one of only two adaptations from stage to film that I can even tolerate. The other is On the Town."

>

> Tolerate

> Tolerate

> Tolerate

> Tolerate

>

> It's not the best representation of the work. Just entertaining on it's own and was filmed for the most part in New York on location which hadn't really been done before that for musical films. The difficulty of filming outside a sound stage must have been overwhelming. Also, Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra. I appreciate your opinion.

 

I wasn't implying you shouldn't like it, but you mentioned your theater roots in connection to WHY you liked it. Given that connection and your mentioning it, one would conclude that you liked the show. How anyone could like that show, and not hate the film, is a mystery to me. They removed almost everything about the show that made it great. Which is the only reason I even mentioned it. I wasn't referring to how or where it was photographed (it was, for the most part, filmed in a studio. The on-location photography is actually very minimal in the film). Or, who was in it. I was referring to what they did to the material. Nobody is more a fan of on-location photography than me! The opening is the best thing about it! Finally, yes, you used the word "tolerate". You also used the word "tolerate" for your choice of your favorite for an entire decade (*West Side Story*). So, one might conclude that you love it! I completely misunderstood your post.

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This is a bit tough, but here goes:

'20s: SUNRISE (1927) F.W. Murnau's Beautifully photographed and well told story of two people

The film is visual poetry.

'30s: FIVE STAR FINAL (1931) A gritty story about the affects of tabloid "journalism" on a family.

It still hold up well some 78 years later. The last 10 minutes are still riveting.

'40s: THE HUMAN COMEDY (1943) A film that gives modern audiences a tiny glimpse of small town life in America during WWII.

'50s: NORTH BY NORTHWEST (1959) Hitchcock's gem of a thriller. Carey Grant shows some remarkable coolness considering the trouble he's in.

'60s: HIGH AND LOW (1963) An excellent drama about a kidnapping from director Akira Kurosawa.

'70s: THE LIFE OF BRIAN (1979) Monty Python's irreverent satire on religion.

'80s: SILVERADO (1985) A great cast and a wonderful film that helped save the western genre from extinction.

'90s: UNFORGIVEN (1993) Clint Eastwood's western masterpiece.

'00s: MASTER & COMMANDER:THE FAR SIDE OF THE WORLD (2003) Excellent story and fine acting help bring this sea faring film to life. The special effects finally caught up the this genre and the naval battles looked far more realistic than in past films.

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> {quote:title=MissMusical wrote:}{quote}

> Ah, Millie dear! I was strangely thinking about you the other day too! See, I was watching Only Angels Have Wings last night and I thought to myself, "Self, I wonder how good 'ol ILRM is doin' on them TCM message boards." Haha. I just had to come and see what was new and see if you were still even here! I had forgotten all about these boards until last night when I finally turned TCM on again. I have been so busy lately with so many things that TCM was just left in the dust. I am getting back into the swing of things now though and hope to be spending some more time here :)

 

Oh, so thinking about angels reminded you of me? ;-)

 

I'm still here (although not as much). I started a [blog|http://www.classicforever.blogspot.com/] in January (because [sarah's|http://cinema-splendor.blogspot.com/] was so stinkin' amazing) and then [Harley|http://harlowcutie11-dreaminginblackandwhite.blogspot.com/] got a blog too, so most of our chatting has shifted over to Blogger. You should get a blog too! That would be so cool.... ;-)

 

You are often in our thoughts over there...usually whenever somebody mentions how Gene *IS* *LESS* than Fred.....hehehe

 

Well, I'm just glad you're back! We should rev up the old Audrey thread sometime...

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Life of Brian is an amazing movie. One of Monty Python's best. And you're completely right about Silverado saving the Western. Also, Kevin Klein is one of the best actors ever in my opinion. Great answers.

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A Fish Called Wanda is one of my favorites, too! Kline is great in it, but it's really an ensemble piece, and it wouldn't work so well if everybody in it - Jamie Lee Curtis, John Cleese, Michael Palin - wasn't at the top of their game.

 

But it's definitely one of the best 80s comedies.

 

P.S. I just remembered, Kline won an Oscar for that one - it's not easy winning one for a comedy.

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