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FOUR HOURS TO KILL (1935)


Guest dredagain

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Amazing little film in narrative structure, camera work, and cast.

 

Richard Barthelmess stars as a murderer on his way to be hanged but for some reasons their journey is stalled and they are at a theater. In the background through the entire film is a staged musical comedy that we hear but never see. The entire action of the film occurs in the theater. We get the various subplot stories of several other actors while everyone is in the theater.

 

Cast includes Ray Milland, Gertrude Michael, Helen Mack, Joe Morrison, Paul Harvey, Roscoe Karns, Dorothy Tree, Olive Tell, Henry Travers, Noel Madison, Charles Wilson, John Howard, Bodil Rosing, and Mitchell Leisen as the orchestra leader (he also directed the film).

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If the person is in UK but illegally selling a film still under copyright in America to an American they are breaking American law and so is the person purchasing the bootleg.

 

However, if they sell the film to another person in the UK they are not breaking the law, if the film is truly free and clear of copyright restrictions in the UK.

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yawn.... I don't know what the copyright issues are for each individual film.... it may not be bootleg in any case even if the seller is in UK... who cares?

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What's with you and this bootleg mania? I never ask where anyone got a copy of a film, and I don't sell films. Just because you don't have a film doesn't mean any copy of it is bootlegged. Copyright laws are different in UK than they are in US and even TCM shows different films in UK than in US because of copyrights that prevent their being shown here but not there.

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oh and while we're at it. Here's a tidbit from the Netflix terms of use:

 

Netflix reserves the right to terminate your membership hereunder if Netflix, in its sole and absolute discretion, believes that you are in violation of this paragraph, such violations including the copying of DVDs rented to you by us, the unauthorized use of our instant watching movie feature, the Netflix Movie Viewer Software or the copying or other unauthorized use of our proprietary content. Netflix does not promote, foster or condone the copying of DVDs or any other infringing activity.

 

Now maybe we can get back to the original topic of this thread.

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Show me where I asked you where you got the film. I didn't. However each person has to make a decision whether or not they are comfortable buying from bootleggers. I made the decision not to several years ago and I try very hard to stick to that.

 

Re: the Netflix disclaimer that is just legal terminology that would never hold up in a court of law if a case were pressed, since time and time again over decades the courts have given consumers the LEGAL RIGHT to make copies of films and tv / radio programs FOR THEIR OWN PERSONAL USE. That language simply gives Netflix the option to terminate your membership, not to prosecute you for any infringement. If Netflix were to follow through on that disclaimer they would probably lose about 90% of their members. lol!

 

There's not much point to "get back to the original topic of this thread" when most people have not seen the bootleg film being described. To me it's rather pointless even to review them on a message board because few will be able to say something like "Oh I loved that film for this and this reason..." or "Wasn't that scene great?", etc. It's even stranger to see bootlegs reviewed right under the eyes of TCM Administrators who know that most American films 1923 and later are not public domain and that TCM itself usually is the only company that has the legal right to broadcast them.

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If it's pointless, then don't read them.....

 

And speaking of pointless, what in hell do you gain by pronouncing a film a bootleg when you have no idea if it is or not?

 

You seem to think you're the last word on every subject, don't you?

 

IGNORE..... now go start an argument with someone else while you steal Netflix films....

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You're the one who keeps personally attacking me Ed, I just state legal facts. Do with them what you will. It's not "stealing" to make backup copies of any film, tv or radio broadcast, as long as it is for *your own personal use*. The courts have ruled on this situation for decades on behalf of the consumer.

 

The trouble arises when you make copies for *others* and especially if you are going to sell them illegally and leave a paper trail behind you (by "you" I don't mean you specifically but people in general). A lot of these bootleggers also don't report their earnings to the IRS.

 

The vast majority of 1923 and later American films are still under copyright protection unless the copyright owner failed to renew the copyright in the 28th year. Four Hours To Kill is still under copyright protection to Paramount / Universal. You can email or search the LoC to find out the status of a film before you hand over your hard earned money to a bootlegger.

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0026378/trivia

 

Four Hours to Kill! (1935)

 

One of over 700 Paramount Productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since.

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I don't wish to get involved in too involved in this copyright discussion, however, if an item is available for legal sale in another country (U.K. or Netherlands for example), it is not illegal to purchase that item (be it CD or DVD) and have sent into the U.S..

The music industry in the above named countries have been selling CDs of vintage jazz that is still under copyright in the U.S. by American record labels for many years. It is not Illegal to purchase these CDs here in the U.S. or online. Because the copyright laws are different in those countries, it is legal to buy them here as imports. That doesn't mean that there might be a copy of FOUR HOURS TO KILL legally available in the U.K., it is possible, as their copyright laws are different. I believe that the only reason more imported versions of classic films are not sold here is because of the region controls in a DVD player. If I had a region free machine I would be purchasing some of the films available from the BIF of other sources in Europe. I just don't wish to spen the money it would cost for the player at this time.

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That's basically what I was saying, Scott. Copyright laws on films and books are different all over the world. Way too complicated to get very involved in since I don't sell films.

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>I don't wish to get involved in too involved in this copyright discussion, however, if an item is available for legal sale in another country (U.K. or Netherlands for example), it is not illegal to purchase that item (be it CD or DVD) and have sent into the U.S.

 

It is not illegal if someone in the UK sells a film still under copyright in the US but not in the UK to another UK citizen. It is illegal for them to sell a film still under copyright in the US to an American citizen without first paying the necessary royalty or license fees to the copyright owner or holder. Most bootleggers work in the shadows and do nothing of the sort. They do it to make extra income for themselves and then don't report it to the government, breaking the law TWICE.

 

The CD companies that are legit in the UK, selling music still under copyright protection in the US, have to pay the royalty and / or license fees in order to sell them legally to US citizens. They don't have to pay these fees when they sell to UK citizens.

 

I know all this because I consulted an intellectual property attorney a number of years ago on this very issue. He became a friend and I designed his website. He worked with Larry Lessig who argued the Sonny Bono Copyright Extension law before the US Supreme Court.

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