Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Judy Garland insults


Recommended Posts

Judy Garland is my favorite actress and one of my favorite singers. The Judy that I like most of all is the Judy of the '50s and '60s, where her voice matured to a husky contralto and gave her best performance (IMO) on "The Man That Got Away".

 

Unfortunately, there is one thing about Judy that I cannot stand: these E! Entertainment revisionist nuts that blame her (prescription) drug addiction on MGM and Louis B. Mayer.

 

On VH1 recently, there was a show called "Child Star Babylon". Judy Garland was included. First, they showed a picture of her as Dorothy, and then the narrator added that she was a "living zombie" (!) and then showed a picture of her that was not very attractive looking taken some 25 years later, and, of course, MGM was blamed for all her problems.

 

Man, I HATE that!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a Judy fan. The only films of hers that I like are "A Star is Born" and "The Wizard of OZ. If anyone has heard the tapes she dictated in anticipation of a biography one can discern her basic attitude. I know that she was drunk and bitter and full of self-pity, white she talked on the recorder, but I think they still hold a germ of truth about her character. First that since she considered herself a world treasure ( I won't argue the point-she was loved by millions) the world had a responsibilty to take care of her when her life got out of control. (As opposed to "mind your own business" when she was going good). Second , I think she had no clue that she was blessed in many ways (fame, wealth, adulation) that us ordinary folks will never be. When she described her present troubles and problems she burst into a particuarly vitriolic tone of voice and screeched "I SANG!!!... I SANG!!!" She apparently didn't realize that billions of others have had to bust their tails to earn a living making modest wages doing things that they didn't particularly feel like doing. Can you imagine how ridiculous it would sound for a teacher to moan after messing up their life with booze, drugs, and poor judgement to rant : "I TAUGHT! I TAUGHT!"? Folks I realize that this sounds harsh but it's just my personal opinion. I have always been irritated to see people feel sorry for the rich and famous. I once remember seeing a woman commenting on "Princess Di's tragic life." (And this was BEFORE she died) The woman who said this was broke from medical treatments for cancer. But "poor Di a beautiful girl (hey, she had ALREADY won the jackpot!)who was forced from a life of privledge into fame, power,extreme wealth, adoration by millions, and then finds to her horror that she STILL doesn't have a PERFECT day EVERY day! "The horror! The Horror!"

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a big Garland fan, filmwise, up to and including Easter Parade. As for singing she was one of the greats until the end. I don't let her private life affect this.

On film after Easter Parade There seemed to be a big change in her on screen appeal for me. I saw Summer Stock for the first time about 9 months ago. Before I saw it I was all hyped - Garland and Kelly - it's going to be great. Sorry to say, and I'll get jumped on for this, it was a let down. Judy looked 40 years old, not the best script, and Kelly was overboard. I got to admit, the old Judy came through in the film on the Get Happy scene, then sadly disappeared I could not believe this was just two years after Easter Parade.

I won't watch her films after Easter Parade (I've seen them at least once) so I can enjoy her earlier stuff more.

A kind of Judy Garland Time capsule.

My Garland Favorites:

#1)Wizard of Oz

#2)Meet Me In St. Louis (Never looked more beautiful)

#3)Easter Parade

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Judy is wonderful. One of the best. No matter how many books and documentary put her down. She has a place in the world's heart forever which will passed down to generation to generation. If the other classic movie stars are forgotten- Judy Garland won't be.

Link to post
Share on other sites

slappy - I completely understand your point, and somewhat agree with you regarding her character. However, you also have to look at things from her perspective. She was forced into fame as a child, and was a superstar throughout her whole life. That right there makes all the difference in the world. It's not like she lived a normal life once upon a time, and then one day someone made her a star. She was ALWAYS a star, and in fact started in show business when she was a baby, mostly due to her mother's pushing. So having that kind of upbringing and a life under the spotlight - it definitely gave her a much different perspective on things than the average person has. And I'm also a fan of Garland's in spite of her problems. She was beyond real with her incredible voice and talent. But I also think that's one of the reason's why she was so self loathing. She basically gave herself to the world, and felt like crap as a person and just couldn't deal with it. I think it was too hard for her to separate her "stage" self with her "real" self. That's probably one of the reasons why she became such a heavy drug addict as well. But I think it's hard for most people who become stars as children - you basically loose your childhood, which can definitely screw you up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe I take your point. I know she had problems, but having good reasons to be a miserable person doesn't make her personality any more likeable...just understandable. IMO. I'm not trying to convince anyone not to like her.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I sufficiently like Judy Garland, but I have to admit that it is difficult for me to watch her without getting sort of depressed thinking of what happened to her as an adult. My favorite Judy movie is Meet Me in St. Louis, which I really love. And I really think that her performance of "Get Happy" is great. But I really don't like seeing her performances later in life simply because watching her just makes me feel such pity and disgust. I don't mean that I'm disgusted with her, I am just disgusted with the circumstances under which she became addicted and with the fact that she was such a talent, and she was so unhappy for much of her life. It's just such a shame and it really makes it difficult for me to enjoy her movies.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been a fan of Judy Garland ever since I was around three years old when I saw 'The Wizard of Oz.' I see where you are coming from, but that is no way to speak of her. She was an excellent actress that deserves more credit than you give her. And must you forget that she was already taking these pills early in her career. She is still the same actress and she had the problem with pill addiction for years. 'Meet Me in St. Louis' is also one of the great films that she made. But she was with Vincent then and perhaps, "happier." Judy Garland is, in my mind, one of the greatest actresses of all time. We must remember her for her work and her undying talent. Not her personal problems. Remember that-

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think maybe the way I worded my reply was a little sketchy, because it's not that I'm not giving her credit at all. I knew she started taking the pills as a child, and that is what I meant by disgust. It's not that I'm disgusted by her, but by the adults who gave her pills to keep her awake when they wanted and make her sleep when they wanted, etc. Basically disgust for giving a teenager a workload that would be taxing even for an adult, thus creating the need to artificially force her body into a schedule it couldn't handle using pills that she would ultimately become addicted to, through no fault of her own. It's because she's such an immense talent that this even happened to her, which is such a shame. Instead of nurturing her prodigious gifts, they exploited them. I also knew that Meet Me In St. Louis was quite possibly the happiest time in her adult life, with Vincente Minnelli, and it certainly shows in her performance-- particularly in The Trolley Song, which, in my opinion, is one of the great scenes in film history thanks to Judy Garland. And, like you, The Wizard of Oz was my favorite movie growing up. (Over the Rainbow was one of the first songs I learned to sing, I was Dorothy one year for Halloween, the whole get-up.) Unfortunately, with all that said, I am sorry to say that I really find myself unable to really enjoy her movies because I just associate her with her unfortunate life so closely that I can't separate the actress from the person. I wish I could enjoy her movies more, but, like I said, I find her movies sort of depressing, thinking what a shame it is that such a talent had such a difficult life. You're right, ideally she should be remembered as simply a beautiful, talented actress/singer. Unfortunately, for me, I can't help adding "... who led a very sad life."

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I thought perhaps someone on this thread could help me. I'm a big fan of Judy's--I've always felt, not only that she was a great singer, but a very good actress. One of her films is what I want to get information about. She was an over-the-hill actress, with a drinking problem. In it, she gave a speech that, as she herself admitted in an interview, came extremely close to her own personal feelings about being a singing star. Strike a bell with anyone? It was really a good movie, and I'd like to at least rent it, but I can't remember the title.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy Judy Garland. Great actress and a beautiful voice. Her drug addiction and alcoholism isn't something I can sympathize with. People who did drugs or who were pushed into drugs made a decision to keep doing them. I don't feel sorry for the people out there that put themselves into that kind of situation and expect pity out of it. However, I don't like how the media exploits those problems to the public. That doesn't mean I feel sorry for the famous and their drug addictions.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fanclassic maybe the name of the movie was I Could Go On Singing? Did the movie you saw entail Judy's caracter going to London and was Dirk Borgarde{probably woefully misspelled} her co-star? Also was the scene you mentioned was she talking to Jack Klugman-Oscar from the Odd Couple? These are from I Could Go on Singing originally titled The Lonely Stage. Also Judy's character was named Jenny Bowman I think. Hope this helps....gwtwbooklover

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I have trouble with the notion that a mentally ill or addicted person "chooses that path." I know it is often hard for people who have never had those problems to dispel the feeling that those illnesses indicate a lack of responsibility. Think how awful it is for the sick person--who often believes that, too. They are only made worse by the feeling of failure they get when they can't stay on the wagon or figure themselves out.

 

I have no way of knowing whether the studio or Mayer ordered Garland to use certain drugs, but I do know that Mayer was quite insensitive to her adolescent weight difficulties and lack of conventional beauty. Her mother wasn't exactly a stroll in the park, either.

 

Garland would have benefited greatly from some of today's medications and therapy (analysis in those days was pretty primitive). She wasn't tough enough for pictures, and people who loved her couldn't love her tough enough to help her (which I acknowledge is near impossible to do). I don't blame anyone in these scenarios--but that includes the person who suffers from mental illness.

 

Sorry. This is just one of my soapbox issues...

 

It?s just such a shame. Garland?s health seemed to show easily in her appearance, and her health varied widely. By the time of "Easter Parade" she looks glowing and relaxed in some scenes, fidgety and weary in others--but it doesn't necessarily mesh with what her character is experiencing. One exception is when Peter Lawford tells

her outright (albeit in a loving way), "And do something with your face; you look horrible!" She does have huge circles under her eyes in that scene.

 

I have read differing accounts of her time at MGM, and it is hard to figure out how much of her drug use was commanded and how much of it was self-medication, etc. Whatever really happened, it was tragic. By the time she was only about 30 she looked so old and worn. There were

changes in her voice in the 1950s that some listeners love, because you can hear such experience and pain there. I'd rather hear her singing from the 1930s than any other time--her ascending notes give me chills, she's so powerful.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Ayresorchids", you are absolutely correct, and thank you for having the courage to express your Compassion and Understanding regarding Judy Garland so very well. Compassion and Understanding are always so much harder, it seems these days, for some people to align themselves with instead of blame, insults, name-calling, and bashing. Good job in showing us the difference in such a positive way. :)ML

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

a complex person.

 

Regardless of whether one feels sorry for her, is disgusted with her, has elevated her to sainthood, or does not even care about her...what is up there on the screen, is great.

 

She was a talented actress in not just comedic-musical type venues, but in drama. Witness her exhilirating performance in "I Could Go on Singing" with Dirk Bogarde.

 

I don't feel pity for her, because her essence transcends that and lives on to continue to entertain and uplift.

 

Her basically self-deprecating humor and sarcasm was also a part of her personality, and one can see it on old talk show excerpts, like those from Jack Paar, et cetera.

 

Her screen persona evolved from a rather simple child with a magnificent voice, to a sophisticated performer with presence, somewhat helped by the intervention of Kay Thompson who defined how Garland should present herself onscreen at MGM in her glamour years, in her stances and use of arms and position while singing, and it worked and gave her a unique screen presence.

 

There is probably no Garland flick that does not have something worth watching, and her nervous rather hyperactive behaviour was perfect on film in giving her a persona to watch as in the Trolley Song set piece in MMISL.

 

Unfortunately her offscreen life was not always as happy, but she did bring joy to many people and still does, so I am happy there was a Judy, or a Frances Gumm.

 

Many of her friends have commented publically on the good and bad sides and it was depicted honestly in that Judy Davis epic on tv, which is quintessential viewing for a Garland fan.

 

I can like a person with flaws, and just appreciate them for the good parts, and still accept that there are some not so likable parts, which I don't think Judy would begrudge.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...