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"Crime and Punishment" - 2002


rayban
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This film is an absolutley amazing adaptation of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's famous novel of the same name.

Its' distribution has been limited by legal matters  that resulted in the seizure of the film in an bankruptcy lien.

I found it on the MGM channel (633 in the tristate area).

It was written and directed by Menahen Golan, who was at the top of his form.

Crispin Glover couldn't be more effective as Raskolnikov,  the law student who thinks that he might be a superior human being and, thus, above the law.

One night, to test his theory,  he murders an old pawnbroker and her sister, who interrupts the crime.

Thereafter, he suffers the most dire consequences, because he realizes that he is just a human being, after all.

John Hurt is also very effective as Porfiry, the police inspector who suspects Raskolnikov of the crime.

The supporting cast is superb - it includes Vanessa Redgrave as Raskolnikov's mother, Matt Servitto as Raskolnikov's friend, Razumikhin and Anital Dicker as Sonia, the prostitute who falls in love with Raskolnikov and Sophie Ward, as Dunia, Raskolnikov's sister, who is engaged to a wealthy man, who is nicely played by Richard Lynch.

The film is set in the near-future of the 21st century, which actually adds to the film's dark and compelling atmosphere.

Some great films get lost, unfortunately.

This film is one of them.

And, why, oh, why, isn't Crispin Gover a big, big star?

388322635cbdd35ec131c423be51d44e.jpg

 

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I would like to see this one. John Hurt, you may know, played Rasky in a relatively short mini series for the BBC in the 80s. Just three episodes I believe.  Have you seen it? Hurt was quite good as you might expect and Porfiry was played brilliantly IMO by Timothy West, who did the cat-and-mouse game with R to perfection. His face has a bit of the devil in it that made him all the more menacing. The taunting and innuendo in discomfiting Raskalnikov was exquisite. 

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

I would like to see this one. John Hurt, you may know, played Rasky in a relatively short mini series for the BBC in the 80s. Just three episodes I believe.  Have you seen it? Hurt was quite good as you might expect and Porfiry was played brilliantly IMO by Timothy West, who did the cat-and-mouse game with R to perfection. His face has a bit of the devil in it that made him all the more menacing. The taunting and innuendo in discomfiting Raskalnikov was exquisite. 

I would love to see this mini-series.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

The only version I've seen is the 1935 version with Peter Lorre. I've had the French version with Harry Baur, also from 1935, recommended to me, but I haven't found a copy as of yet. 

Peter Lorre was all wrong for the lead role.

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17 hours ago, rayban said:

It was written and directed by Menahen Golan, who was at the top of his form.

Okay, I must ask what Menahem Golan's "form" is.  

(If you've seen the "Electric Boogaloo" documentary about the Cannon Pictures glory days, it's certainly not the first time Golan's ambitious literary eyes were bigger than his stomach--And I still can't find his 80's Cannon version of "Threepenny Opera" on YouTube.)

TBH, I thought he was dead, but this apparently predated that.

17 hours ago, rayban said:

And, why, oh, why, isn't Crispin Gover a big, big star?

Ask Dave.

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2 hours ago, rayban said:

Peter Lorre was all wrong for the lead role.

Can you say, just briefly. I saw the film and I may have thought that myself. Unfortunately poor Eddie Arnold didn't get a fair shake from me. I was continually making comparison with Timothy West. Not good. The difference in the portrayals had a lot to do with the way Hollywood and BBC did things and the styles of acting were completely different. Arnold seemed bland and dull (to me anyway, because I was comparing) but he was being who he was Hollywood style and how things were done in his own time. I would think Lorre would be a bit to singular (in face especially) that may have made him inappropriate for Rasky, whose actions were associated with philosophy and not for being a weirdo (apologies to Peter, but Pete you could really look weird sometimes).

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10 hours ago, laffite said:

Can you say, just briefly. I saw the film and I may have thought that myself. Unfortunately poor Eddie Arnold didn't get a fair shake from me. I was continually making comparison with Timothy West. Not good. The difference in the portrayals had a lot to do with the way Hollywood and BBC did things and the styles of acting were completely different. Arnold seemed bland and dull (to me anyway, because I was comparing) but he was being who he was Hollywood style and how things were done in his own time. I would think Lorre would be a bit to singular (in face especially) that may have made him inappropriate for Rasky, whose actions were associated with philosophy and not for being a weirdo (apologies to Peter, but Pete you could really look weird sometimes).

Crispin Glover, who can be quite weird - remember his ****-obsessed performance in that David Lynch epic with Nicholas Cage and Laura Dern? - gave a beautifully controlled performance that centered on a young man who was not up to the challenge of his so-called thoughts and convictions.

He simply wasn't the man he thought he was.

John Hurt played the cat and mouse aspects of his intriguing role with such a sly patience.

You just knew that this cat was going to catch that mouse!

When Raskolnikov is released from prison in Siberia after seven years into the waiting arms of Sonia, who has moved to Siberia to be near him, you just know that she and she alone will wean him back into the process of living.

  

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On 8/26/2018 at 7:31 AM, rayban said:

This film is an absolutley amazing adaptation of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's famous novel of the same name.

Its' distribution has been limited by legal matters  that resulted in the seizure of the film in an bankruptcy lien.

I found it on the MGM channel (633 in the tristate area).

It was written and directed by Menahen Golan, who was at the top of his form.

Crispin Glover couldn't be more effective as Raskolnikov,  the law student who thinks that he might be a superior human being and, thus, above the law.

One night, to test his theory,  he murders an old pawnbroker and her sister, who interrupts the crime.

Thereafter, he suffers the most dire consequences, because he realizes that he is just a human being, after all.

John Hurt is also very effective as Porfiry, the police inspector who suspects Raskolnikov of the crime.

The supporting cast is superb - it includes Vanessa Redgrave as Raskolnikov's mother, Matt Servitto as Raskolnikov's friend, Razumikhin and Anital Dicker as Sonia, the prostitute who falls in love with Raskolnikov and Sophie Ward, as Dunia, Raskolnikov's sister, who is engaged to a wealthy man, who is nicely played by Richard Lynch.

The film is set in the near-future of the 21st century, which actually adds to the film's dark and compelling atmosphere.

Some great films get lost, unfortunately.

This film is one of them.

And, why, oh, why, isn't Crispin Gover a big, big star?

388322635cbdd35ec131c423be51d44e.jpg

 

Some rising actors just have their potential moments come and go, I think. I recently mentioned Christian Slater in another thread. Glover's closest moments to big-time stardom were his playing Michael j. Fox's dad in Back to the Future and his David Letterman appearances (which I'm still not sure if they were Andy Kaufman performance art or a guy who was really struggling to get through the day). But either the big studios considered him too odd, or he followed his own muse. You can look at his career path on imdb, and while he's in some big Hollywood blockbusters, they're all in smaller roles, while his larger roles are all in indie films.

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He's an idiosyncratic, but major talent.

I wish that some film could have pushed him over into the stratosphere of stardom.

In "Crime and Punishment", he carries a difficult film with such ease and style.

And that, my friends, was sixteen years ago!

 

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5 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Glover's closest moments to big-time stardom were his playing Michael j. Fox's dad in Back to the Future and his David Letterman appearances (which I'm still not sure if they were Andy Kaufman performance art or a guy who was really struggling to get through the day). But either the big studios considered him too odd, or he followed his own muse. You can look at his career path on imdb, and while he's in some big Hollywood blockbusters, they're all in smaller roles, while his larger roles are all in indie films.

His David Letterman appearance was in his quirky-oddball character from "Rubin & Ed" trying to promote it, which...if we had ever heard of him OR the movie, would have been a maverick stunt.  Unfortunately, we didn't and he didn't, you can see Dave's cold, hostile stare from the minute Glover walked out, and when Crispin aimed that kick ("I'm good at martial arts!"), to say Dave had no idea he was kidding is the understatement of the century.  Dave had already been through Andy Kaufman's big faked-up wrestling stunts on his show, but that was back when we'd heard of Kaufman.

It was only later that everyone, including the show, found out what the heck Glover had been doing, and they invited him back on for an "apology" followup appearance if he agreed to come as himself.  He did, showed off some of his weirdo art, and...let's just say it didn't exactly restore his career after the first appearance became TV legend.

And frankly, Glover playing George McFly just reeks of the "Look, I'm playing a NERD!" performance stunt that seems to attract the gonzo-quirky actors.  Like Kaufman on "Taxi", one good acting gig fooled us into thinking he could ever be mainstream professional.

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12 hours ago, EricJ said:

His David Letterman appearance was in his quirky-oddball character from "Rubin & Ed" trying to promote it, which...if we had ever heard of him OR the movie, would have been a maverick stunt.  Unfortunately, we didn't and he didn't, you can see Dave's cold, hostile stare from the minute Glover walked out, and when Crispin aimed that kick ("I'm good at martial arts!"), to say Dave had no idea he was kidding is the understatement of the century.  Dave had already been through Andy Kaufman's big faked-up wrestling stunts on his show, but that was back when we'd heard of Kaufman.

It was only later that everyone, including the show, found out what the heck Glover had been doing, and they invited him back on for an "apology" followup appearance if he agreed to come as himself.  He did, showed off some of his weirdo art, and...let's just say it didn't exactly restore his career after the first appearance became TV legend.

And frankly, Glover playing George McFly just reeks of the "Look, I'm playing a NERD!" performance stunt that seems to attract the gonzo-quirky actors.  Like Kaufman on "Taxi", one good acting gig fooled us into thinking he could ever be mainstream professional.

His "David Letterman" appearances were almost enough to destroy a career.

He was obviously "out-of-control".

Wasn't his book, "Ratcatching", actually published? 

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8 hours ago, rayban said:

His "David Letterman" appearances were almost enough to destroy a career.

He was obviously "out-of-control".

Three nights later, a cynical, bottle-crawled Oliver Reed (he never got his career back until "Gladiator", and then it was too late) came on Dave's show to promote his breakout-indie movie--He arrived visibly sloshed, grumpy, and refusing to play along with the interview, instead putting on a Texas accent and pretending to be a "Dallas" character.  (Dave:  "Yes, it's fun to pretend, isn't it?")

Dave was still clearly smarting from Crispin's follies when he finally interrupted Reed with "Y'know, I've bailed out on these before...You might end up flying this plane by yourself."   :D

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