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thank you, TCM, I was pleasantly surprised...


NipkowDisc
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10 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

that you had the decency to show a sound print of ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT last nite.

you did something right for a change.

I salute you!

:D

"All Quiet on The Western Front" holds up remarkably well given its early talkie pedigree, its age being why there is even a silent version to begin with. There is very little of the exaggerated movements and speech that is found in other films made in 1929, and the dialogue flows quite naturally. If I could criticize at all it is that everybody talks like they are from the Bronx instead of Germany, but I'll grant Universal that. This makes a great double feature with "Darkest Hour", a film that doesn't do a very good job of telling you why many members of Parliament were so hesitant to fight it out with Hitler when the choice really came down to war versus slavery. The perspective of AQOTWF answers that question.

I don't think Universal won another Best Picture Oscar until 1973 and The Sting. That's a long dry spell for a major studio.

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1 hour ago, calvinnme said:

"All Quiet on The Western Front" holds up remarkably well given its early talkie pedigree, its age being why there is even a silent version to begin with. There is very little of the exaggerated movements and speech that is found in other films made in 1929, and the dialogue flows quite naturally. If I could criticize at all it is that everybody talks like they are from the Bronx instead of Germany, but I'll grant Universal that. This makes a great double feature with "Darkest Hour", a film that doesn't do a very good job of telling you why many members of Parliament were so hesitant to fight it out with Hitler when the choice really came down to war versus slavery. The perspective of AQOTWF answers that question.

I don't think Universal won another Best Picture Oscar until 1973 and The Sting. That's a long dry spell for a major studio.

ITC remade ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT in 1979 with Richard Thomas and Ernest Borgnine. Patricia Neal plays Thomas' mother and I think it's an excellent version.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Quiet_on_the_Western_Front_(1979_film)

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33 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

"All Quiet on The Western Front" holds up remarkably well given its early talkie pedigree, its age being why there is even a silent version to begin with. There is very little of the exaggerated movements and speech that is found in other films made in 1929, and the dialogue flows quite naturally. If I could criticize at all it is that everybody talks like they are from the Bronx instead of Germany, but I'll grant Universal that. This makes a great double feature with "Darkest Hour", a film that doesn't do a very good job of telling you why many members of Parliament were so hesitant to fight it out with Hitler when the choice really came down to war versus slavery. The perspective of AQOTWF answers that question.

I don't think Universal won another Best Picture Oscar until 1973 and The Sting. That's a long dry spell for a major studio.

Hamlet (1948) was distributed in the US by Universal. You could argue that doesn't really make it a Universal production, but I feel it was highly likely someone from Universal was among the people who took the stage when it was announced as the Best Picture winner!

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1 hour ago, NipkowDisc said:

hat you had the decency to show a sound print of ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT last nite.

you did something right for a change.

Yeah, good goin' there TCM. Now you can go back to screwin' up all the time :lol:.

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The film originally featured Zasu Pitts as Paul's mother. Here is a trailer I restored some years ago (it was a silent print and I reconstructed the soundtrack). Since Zasu appears in the trailer and she is not in the feature, I had to insert her dialogue from a 1938 radio broadcast where she recreated the bedroom scene from ALL QUIET.

 

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37 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Did you mean to say that now Nipkow can go back to complaining all of the time?  

Hey, there's still the extra 5 seconds of the Hammer Dracula he has to worry about! :lol: 

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2 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Hamlet (1948) was distributed in the US by Universal. You could argue that doesn't really make it a Universal production, but I feel it was highly likely someone from Universal was among the people who took the stage when it was announced as the Best Picture winner!

Robert Osborne's book on the Oscars credits J. Arthur Rank-Two Cities Films for the Best Picture producer for Hamlet. The intro to the copy I have has "Arthur Rank Productions". But in spite of that, I think I remember a copy of Hamlet with the Universal-International intro. I just don't remember where I saw it.

Hey, TopBilled, are you ever going to forgive me for disrespecting  1940s Universal?

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35 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

Robert Osborne's book on the Oscars credits J. Arthur Rank-Two Cities Films for the Best Picture producer for Hamlet. The intro to the copy I have has "Arthur Rank Productions". But in spite of that, I think I remember a copy of Hamlet with the Universal-International intro. I just don't remember where I saw it.

Hey, TopBilled, are you ever going to forgive me for disrespecting  1940s Universal?

Hey calvin-- I don't recall you being too disrespectful. :) 

Since Universal "fostered" this British picture's U.S. distribution it's probably safe to assume they helped push it towards Oscar victory. I don't think Rank's company was a key player in the arena of Hollywood politics and Oscar voting. At least not at this time.

Rank started Eagle-Lion which was his way of distributing British film products in North America through his own company. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle-Lion_Films

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1 hour ago, slaytonf said:

It's nothing unusual. TCM almost never shows the silent version.

Actually, the last two times Front aired on TCM prior to this airing, it was the silent version. I guess Nipkow wasn't watching the first time, but he was definitely watching the second time when he got on these boards and made it sound like the worst crime ever perpetrated in the history of humanity

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6 hours ago, calvinnme said:

Robert Osborne's book on the Oscars credits J. Arthur Rank-Two Cities Films for the Best Picture producer for Hamlet. The intro to the copy I have has "Arthur Rank Productions". But in spite of that, I think I remember a copy of Hamlet with the Universal-International intro. I just don't remember where I saw it.

Hey, TopBilled, are you ever going to forgive me for disrespecting  1940s Universal?

Many years ago, I hand-copied a lot of information out one of the Oscar history books. I still use this notebook as my primary Oscar reference today. I'm weird like that! I thought it was Osborne's book, but possibly it was not. Whatever book I copied it out of listed Universal along with Rank as a producer, because that's what I wrote down in my notebook 16 or 17 years ago. Anyway, you can look at production companies on imdb and see that Universal-International was clearly the film's American distributor. 

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9 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Many years ago, I hand-copied a lot of information out one of the Oscar history books. I still use this notebook as my primary Oscar reference today. I'm weird like that! I thought it was Osborne's book, but possibly it was not. Whatever book I copied it out of listed Universal along with Rank as a producer, because that's what I wrote down in my notebook 16 or 17 years ago. Anyway, you can look at production companies on imdb and see that Universal-International was clearly the film's American distributor. 

I have Osborne's book in front of me and Universal is not credited in the award. I realize that Universal distributed the film in the US, but usually the distributor is not credited by the Academy when a film wins an award.  However, like I said, I think I remember seeing a copy of Hamlet with the Universal-International logo at the beginning.

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17 hours ago, laffite said:

To whatever degree TCM screws up, to that same degree and much more they do not.

I'd go further to suggest that anyone who feels TCM "screws up" too much that they raise the capital and start their OWN "classic" movie channel, and SHOW us all how to do it "right"!  ;)

Sepiatone

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20 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

The film originally featured Zasu Pitts as Paul's mother. Here is a trailer I restored some years ago (it was a silent print and I reconstructed the soundtrack). Since Zasu appears in the trailer and she is not in the feature, I had to insert her dialogue from a 1938 radio broadcast where she recreated the bedroom scene from ALL QUIET.

 

Nicely done, Ray!

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On 8/29/2018 at 9:04 AM, NipkowDisc said:

that you had the decency to show a sound print of ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT last nite.

you did something right for a change.

I salute you!

:D

Wow! What a shock!

The seldom seen "Glass Half-Full" side of ol' Nip here!

(...guess I shouldn't rock the boat here and remind him that TCM didn't show a colorized version of this flick, huh)

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On 8/29/2018 at 1:31 PM, laffite said:

Yeah, good goin' there TCM. Now you can go back to screwin' up all the time :lol:.

It was kind of a back handed compliment, Nip but left a good opening for Laffite to use for some wanted comedy here so pat yourself on the back!

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17 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Many years ago, I hand-copied a lot of information out one of the Oscar history books. I still use this notebook as my primary Oscar reference today. I'm weird like that! I thought it was Osborne's book, but possibly it was not. Whatever book I copied it out of listed Universal along with Rank as a producer, because that's what I wrote down in my notebook 16 or 17 years ago. Anyway, you can look at production companies on imdb and see that Universal-International was clearly the film's American distributor. 

Just curious-- what does Osborne's book say about THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES? It was actually produced by Sam Goldwyn's company and merely distributed by RKO. Does Osborne credit RKO?

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