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8 1/2


CaveGirl
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 The simple explanation for Fellini's "8 1/2" is that it is a film about film, but it is so much more. The original planned title was to be "The Beautiful Confusion" and one can see in its components, Fellini's love of magic, memories and the circus all infused by characters moving in and out of the center ring spotlight with Fellini as the master of ceremonies. As the Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film of 1963, it has achieved possibly a much higher status as the years pass by.

To begin or not begin, that is the question Federico was faced with after finishing work on "La Dolce Vita". Though he already had a studio, sets, a contract and producer yet Fellini had no real concept for the film. Believing that talking about any upcoming project often crystallizes it, Fellini refused to discuss his non-existent film idea mostly, all the while resigned to possibly quitting the project altogether. Attending a party by the crew, Fellini was toasted about his upcoming "masterpiece" which catapulted him into a sense of devotion towards their faith in him, and a desire to share the story of his directorial confusion and blockage, by making the film ostensibly reflect this as it occurs. It was first to be about a writer, but Fellini changed this to a director, with G-u-i-d-o played by Marcello Mastroianni, with Fellini himself as the protagonist. This is the basic origin of this brilliant film with the new title of "8 1/2" demonstrating the film's connection to his real career even though this is actually inaccurate.

Knowing the background is one thing, seeing it is another. "8 1/2" is so much more than its parts, and its parts consist of shimmering dreamlike images as the viewer is allowed to enter Fellini's mind in a fuguelike state, to contemplate his past and current relationships, memories of childhood, the ins and outs of making a movie, accidental serendipitous situations all amounting to an insightful and constantly entertaining melange. 
Along the way we meet the many various types of people who exist in the world, each revealing their own special viewpoint and place in society. We see the director's relationships with wife, Luisa and his paramour, his Dreamgirl, Claudia, along with characters signifying perennial types like The Actress, The Producer, The Model, The Doctor, The Journalist, The Agent, The Producer's Girlfriend, The Cardinal, and so on. Iconic scenes set in the opening sequence devoid of sound where Marcello is in the traffic jam, the farmhouse with so many women, faux bullfights and religious rituals remain indelibly imprinted on one's brain.

Knowing the storyline well, I decided to watch last night without reading any subtitles, just to be able to watch the incredible cinematography by Gianni di Venanzo under the Maestro's guidance. Close-ups like those centering on folks like the iconic horror queen, Barbara Steele, thrill the eye and characters glide across the screen in alternately comic, ironic, grotesque and fantasy laden sequences with dazzling changes of scene and tone. By the way, the clothes, architectural scenery and modernism are also fantastically realized in "8 1/2".

This movie is a mirror and self-referential about recriminations and postponement but at base about fear. The fear of not being able to fill the void, to avoid repeating oneself and not being creative. We learn the void is unavoidable, but it is the journey not the destination, which Fellini shows us makes life worthwhile, magical and inspirational. The fear of repeating his successes with no maturation of talent, is fully manifested in this classic film, which says everything that needs to be said about the creative process. The storyline in essence doesn't need to be told by me, since this is a movie which needs to be seen and can't be relayed alone by a synopsis. Paradoxically it is Fellini's block which helps him to realize his masterpiece.

So...SEE IT! And if you missed last night's presentation put it high on your list of films to see, since it is a foundation stone of world cinema, deserving all the acclaim and accolades it has received since its initial release. It presents many questions, but only some answers yet still is profound and compelling. But feel free to disagree or voice your dislike of the film if you want as all voices are welcome.

Asa Nisi Maso!

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This was either my fourth or fifth time to see 8 1/2. I feel like there are some dots I'm still not connecting in my head that Fellini probably intended for his audience to take away from the film. As you said, it gives us more questions than answers, but I try not to let that detract me from its overall power. I do probably spend too much time "reading" all the dialogue, a lot of which is probably not necessary, for example, that screenwriter who talks and talks and talks, and I'm not sure he says anything important in the whole movie (At one point, Mastroianni fantasizes the writer gets hung, and Fellini probably wanted the audience to laugh in support at that point). It's certainly ambitious and compelling.

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13 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

This was either my fourth or fifth time to see 8 1/2. I feel like there are some dots I'm still not connecting in my head that Fellini probably intended for his audience to take away from the film. As you said, it gives us more questions than answers, but I try not to let that detract me from its overall power. I do probably spend too much time "reading" all the dialogue, a lot of which is probably not necessary, for example, that screenwriter who talks and talks and talks, and I'm not sure he says anything important in the whole movie (At one point, Mastroianni fantasizes the writer gets hung, and Fellini probably wanted the audience to laugh in support at that point). It's certainly ambitious and compelling.

I always read the subtitles, but once was in a small village in Italy on a trip and had separated from my friends to do what I wanted for the afternoon. Came upon a tiny theater which had a giant poster of "8 1/2" in front and it was playing a matinee and I went in to watch thinking it would be fun to see it sans subtitles and with a local audience. There was a whole different flavor of reactions to the film, so different from what I remembered the dialogue being about. Reminds me of Freud and his book "Jokes and the Unconscious" saying that puns in dreams are not relatable if one is speaking a different language. 

I'm sure you are getting most of the meanings but t'is true that even a viewer who's seen it ten times who is American might be missing some in-jokes or references. I do know that Fellini tried to have things seem prophetic and get accomplished later in the film, and that his fellow script writers did have fun supposedly making up the names of characters and that yes, some of them were direct personifications of real people that neither of us might know, so we would miss that point. Also speaking about a director having total control of the proceedings, I remember that Fellini said he had a different ending in mind, that got vetoed and then he found that some footage he had already shot seemed more perfect to him, than what he had wanted. so he used it, and was most pleased ultimately, which I think is interesting. Not getting what you want, sometimes leads to better things. Thanks for your post and well formulated thoughts, sew!

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On 8/31/2018 at 9:46 AM, CaveGirl said:

...SEE IT! And if you missed last night's presentation put it high on your list of films to see,...

All of the Marcello Mastroianni films aired yesterday (8/30/2018), including 8 1/2, are currently available for re-viewing the next seven days on WATCH TCM ON-DEMAND.
So if you like "Foreign" there is Quite the Italian-Franco fest to be enjoyed!

You got me to thinking about my own time in Italy now, molte grazie ;):)
 

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

TLDR

I had to look your acronym up since I'm kind of cyber ignorant, Tiki and this is what I found below. But we know from your very knowledgeable and interesting posts that you are not "lazy", "ignorant" or don't enjoy reading, so maybe you meant something else?

Thanks for your interest and response though to my post, as I always appreciate your input.

Urban Dictionary: TLDR

Too Long. Didn't Read. Frequently used acronym by lazy, ignorant people in Internet Forums, where their urge to type something exceeds their ability to read ...
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I assume you are talking about Tiki, since I would never be "snarky" online, swewhite.

And I can't be "funny" since I have basically little sense of humor.

Putting things in print online or on paper, can lead to being sued, so I am tres cautious. I even control any sarcastic comments I might make about our president that can be traced, since he might sue me and take all my money which I need to buy movies.

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On 9/1/2018 at 6:39 AM, TikiSoo said:

TLDR

Since it was a day of foreign (non english speaking) language movies, perhaps TLDW (Too Long, Didn't Watch) would be more appropriate.

On second thought, since it was a day of foreign language movies (all captioned) perhaps your original acronym was the more appropriate, unless some variation of TLDW(or)R is acceptable?

On a side-thought, a well made movie in any language is worth watching, and even without captions (or reading them) the characterizations, verbal tone, and action does pretty well at providing  the gist of the movie.

On a further side-thought, I remember during my H.S. days when a bunch of us would gather together in somebodies room and, while under the influence of some psychotropic enhancement, we'd turn the TV volume all the way down and be thoroughly entertained watching a movie (or whatever displayed itself upon the screen) without sound or captions... of course sometimes we'd inappropriately laugh hysterically while watching the most melodramatic scenes (as if we were all affected with PBA)... but we'd sometimes get just as giddy when tripping on people in public while high, so that type of behavior wasn't all that unusual for us during that period of our adolescent development.

Anyway Tiki, the point (if there is a point to all this) might be, not to deny yourself the opportunity to enjoy a foreign language movie, even if you don't feel like reading the captions at that time. You just might find yourself being entertained. ;):)

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Before I watch a foreign language film, I search the title on IMDb or Wiki to get the plot mapped out. This works for me, as I don't miss too much action while trying to read the translation on the screen, or I can just watch without reading the captions at all and still be able to follow the film.

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Belated response to

On 8/31/2018 at 9:46 AM, CaveGirl said:

Asa Nisi Maso!

All I have to say to that is "Rosebud!" ;):D

"Asa Nisi Masa" Meaning
https://everipedia.org/wiki/Asa_Nisi_Masa/

Although the phrase "Asa Nisi Masa" has no translation in any known language — and Fellini never publicly revealed the meaning of the phrase — it is generally thought that Fellini used an Italian children’s game, similar to Pig Latin, to create it. In the game the syllables "si" and "sa" are added to existing words to obscure them, which Fellini does with the word "anima": A-sa + Ni-si + Ma-sa. The word "anima" has dual significance in this context; not only is it the Italian word for "soul" but it is also a key concept in the work of the Swiss psychotherapist Carl Jung (of whom Fellini was fond), where "anima" is the term for the female aspect of the personality in men, a common Fellini theme.

Like "Rosebud" in Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, or the madeleine in Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time, "Asa Nisi Masa" becomes a central plot point, a MacGuffin, as a gateway to crucial memories of the central character — even though it is itself peripheral to the central story.
 

What are other interpretations of the phrase "Asa Nisi Masa" as it's used in Federico Fellini's 8 1/2? Or how do you personally interpret it?

Christopher White, Italian film scholar and avid viewer of movies of all kinds, said the following:

"Asa nisi masa" is a play off of the word "anima" ("soul" in Italian), the sort of thing children do to words in English with pig Latin. It serves as a trigger for ****'s memories.
At the time the film was made Fellini was reading Carl Jung and regularly meeting with the Jungian psychoanalyst Dr. Ernst Bernhard. According to Jung, the anima represents the feminine aspects of a man's psyche and is part of his inner personality or the unconscious.
Fellini references the anima because of its association with dreams, creativity and, most importantly, its influence on man's interactions with women.

**** clearly has some issues there, and mention of the "anima" clues us in to the fact that we are about to get to know something about the protagonist's past and some of the experiences that helped make him who he is.
There are some interesting autobiographical elements in the sequence, for example the allusion to Fellini's grandmother Franzscheina (the old woman with the black scarf wrapped around her head speaking to **** in unintelligible dialect). The memory ends with the little girl telling **** that it happens to be the special night in which saying the words "asa nisi masa" will make the eyes of the painting on the wall move.
The sliver of light from under the door in the dark room and ****'s position on the bed hint at film projection and the art of cinema. It's an appropriate conclusion to the first in a series of memories that help **** get to the bottom of his creative and personal crisis."

(NOTE: Have no idea why the Autocensor thinks that **** (the name of the main charactor in 8 1/2 ) deserves to be **** ???? :huh:
So when reading the above just substitute  G u i d o  for the ****, geesh! ):wacko:



In Jan. 2009, Taylor Shelton played an original song on YouTube entitled "Asa Nisi Masa"
When questioned about the songs title he had this to say:  

"I first heard the phrase on Fellini's 8 1/2. I've never been incredibly familiar with what it means but  I've always thought it sounded cool. I think it's got something to do with femininity in males. Something about "Anima." 

 

Asa Nisi Masa (Original Song) by Taylor Shelton (oh, and please do not try to "steal" it) :rolleyes:

 

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On 8/31/2018 at 10:46 AM, CaveGirl said:

 The simple explanation for Fellini's "8 1/2" is that it is a film about film, but it is so much more. The original planned title was to be "The Beautiful Confusion" and one can see in its components, Fellini's love of magic, memories and the circus all infused by characters moving in and out of the center ring spotlight with Fellini as the master of ceremonies. As the Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film of 1963, it has achieved possibly a much higher status as the years pass by.

To begin or not begin, that is the question Federico was faced with after finishing work on "La Dolce Vita". Though he already had a studio, sets, a contract and producer yet Fellini had no real concept for the film. Believing that talking about any upcoming project often crystallizes it, Fellini refused to discuss his non-existent film idea mostly, all the while resigned to possibly quitting the project altogether. Attending a party by the crew, Fellini was toasted about his upcoming "masterpiece" which catapulted him into a sense of devotion towards their faith in him, and a desire to share the story of his directorial confusion and blockage, by making the film ostensibly reflect this as it occurs. It was first to be about a writer, but Fellini changed this to a director, with G-u-i-d-o played by Marcello Mastroianni, with Fellini himself as the protagonist. This is the basic origin of this brilliant film with the new title of "8 1/2" demonstrating the film's connection to his real career even though this is actually inaccurate.

Knowing the background is one thing, seeing it is another. "8 1/2" is so much more than its parts, and its parts consist of shimmering dreamlike images as the viewer is allowed to enter Fellini's mind in a fuguelike state, to contemplate his past and current relationships, memories of childhood, the ins and outs of making a movie, accidental serendipitous situations all amounting to an insightful and constantly entertaining melange. 
Along the way we meet the many various types of people who exist in the world, each revealing their own special viewpoint and place in society. We see the director's relationships with wife, Luisa and his paramour, his Dreamgirl, Claudia, along with characters signifying perennial types like The Actress, The Producer, The Model, The Doctor, The Journalist, The Agent, The Producer's Girlfriend, The Cardinal, and so on. Iconic scenes set in the opening sequence devoid of sound where Marcello is in the traffic jam, the farmhouse with so many women, faux bullfights and religious rituals remain indelibly imprinted on one's brain.

Knowing the storyline well, I decided to watch last night without reading any subtitles, just to be able to watch the incredible cinematography by Gianni di Venanzo under the Maestro's guidance. Close-ups like those centering on folks like the iconic horror queen, Barbara Steele, thrill the eye and characters glide across the screen in alternately comic, ironic, grotesque and fantasy laden sequences with dazzling changes of scene and tone. By the way, the clothes, architectural scenery and modernism are also fantastically realized in "8 1/2".

This movie is a mirror and self-referential about recriminations and postponement but at base about fear. The fear of not being able to fill the void, to avoid repeating oneself and not being creative. We learn the void is unavoidable, but it is the journey not the destination, which Fellini shows us makes life worthwhile, magical and inspirational. The fear of repeating his successes with no maturation of talent, is fully manifested in this classic film, which says everything that needs to be said about the creative process. The storyline in essence doesn't need to be told by me, since this is a movie which needs to be seen and can't be relayed alone by a synopsis. Paradoxically it is Fellini's block which helps him to realize his masterpiece.

So...SEE IT! And if you missed last night's presentation put it high on your list of films to see, since it is a foundation stone of world cinema, deserving all the acclaim and accolades it has received since its initial release. It presents many questions, but only some answers yet still is profound and compelling. But feel free to disagree or voice your dislike of the film if you want as all voices are welcome.

Asa Nisi Maso!

Nice review, CaveGirl. 8 1/2 indeed shows how all-consuming being a director is. Claudia Cardinale's character Claudia, is almost ghost-like. She's the one woman in which Mastroianni's self-defenses melt away. I too love this film.  

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8 1/2 has some brilliant moments and great cinematography. The film goes downhill for me with the arrival of Sandra Milo. She's only playing the role as Fellini wants her to, but I find her annoying every moment she's on screen. If our hero is involved with a woman as stupid and high maintenance as this, he loses my respect and even my interest. I will also admit that I never care about our hero's film or whether it's worth making. That being said, there are some wonderful scenes and wonderful shots, but as a whole it doesn't compare with the earlier Fellini films which are about other people, all of them more interesting than the film director (either Fellini or the main character in 8 1/2).

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A companion piece to "8 1/2" could be Ingmar Bergman's "Wild Strawberries," which also starts with a nightmare scene, and mixes dreams, fantasies, and reality in an existential story about a man haunted by the past and tormented by the present. 

Fellini's "Juliet of the Spirit" is sort of a female version of "8 1/2:" a tormented wife reflects on her past and present through flashbacks and dreams.

The most audacious thing about "8 1/2" is that reality and fantasy come and go without warning.  We are shown, in the protagonist's mind, the blurring of the line between real and unreal.

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Stephen55 said while under the influence of some psychotropic enhancement, we'd turn the TV volume all the way down and be thoroughly entertained watching a movie (or whatever displayed itself upon the screen) without sound or captions...

I've absolutely done that in my teenage years with the exact same hilarity. Didn't you & your friends narrate, like MST3K? We did. Godzilla Vs The Smog Monster was a run to the chemist for Metamucil-the runs! Lordy, how funny (ugh how embarrassing!) The hilarity is gone once you grow out of f a r t jokes

Anyway Tiki, the point (if there is a point to all this) might be, not to deny yourself the opportunity to enjoy a foreign language movie, even if you don't feel like reading the captions at that time. You just might find yourself being entertained. Oh I love foreign films, as much as silents.
I have found subtitles particularly entertaining when on the phone with my 90 year old Mother who rambles on like (>)Edith Bunker. I'll occasionally say "uh-huh" but have to keep my reactions to the movie silent.

That's a great suggestion, sagebrush!

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On 9/4/2018 at 1:48 AM, Stephan55 said:

Since it was a day of foreign (non english speaking) language movies, perhaps TLDW (Too Long, Didn't Watch) would be more appropriate....

On second thought, since it was a day of foreign language movies (all captioned) perhaps your original acronym was the more appropriate, unless some variation of TLDW(or)R is acceptable?



Anyway Tiki, the point (if there is a point to all this) might be, not to deny yourself the opportunity to enjoy a foreign language movie, even if you don't feel like reading the captions at that time. You just might find yourself being entertained. ;):)

Stephan, I think maybe Tiki was referring to the original post itself, not the film.

I've never asked her, but as far as I know, TikiSoo does not have a problem watching foreign language films with English sub-titles.However, I shouldn't speak for her, I don't really know.

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Just now, misswonderly3 said:

Stephan, I think maybe Tiki was referring to the original post itself, not the film.

I've never asked her, but as far as I know, TikiSoo does not have a problem watching foreign language films with English sub-titles.However, I shouldn't speak for her, I don't really know.

Thanks missw. I agree.
Tiki clearified that herself as well.

On 9/4/2018 at 2:08 PM, TikiSoo said:

Oh I love foreign films, as much as silents.

I think that those of us who responded to 

On 9/1/2018 at 6:39 AM, TikiSoo said:

TLDR

were confused because we weren't sure what it (nor she) meant by that.
But it's all good, cause we all learned a little more as result, I think.;):)

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I love 8 1/2. It's one of my favourite films, I'd list it in my top 20 for sure.Maybe top 10. Doesn't matter... I own the DVD ( the Criterion editon !) and am so glad I do.

8 1/2 is one of those films that has everything: it's by turns moving, imaginative, mysterious, nostalgic, thought-provoking, sardonic, and often funny as hell. I love it that Fellini just threw up his hands and went, basically, "I have no idea what my next film will be about, so I'll just make it about that - a cinematic rendering of the experience of writer's/ artist's block. It will be about everything and nothing."

This could have been disastrous, it could have ended up as horribly pretentious, as the film's characters, especially the agent, producer, writer, and journalist all seem to want it to be. But Fellini avoids that by embracing his lack of creative direction and making it both touching and funny. He seems to have lost his Muse, what's he to do? I always thought the simultaneously virginal and desirable Claudia Cardinale was supposed to represent his Muse. It's revealing how he idealizes her, and is disappointed when the real Claudia ( as opposed to the Dream Woman Claudia), demands to know where the film is going, what it's about, and what is her character and her lines, just like everyone else in Gweedo's world.

I love the childhood memories and the dream sequences. That scene with the  pre-adolescent boys watching Saraghina dancing on the beach is priceless !

And the ending is perfect. I've always thought of it as Gweedo just throwing everything and everybody into the mix, a great big joyous parade. For some reason I find the final scene joyful and life-affirming. It just works, I can't even articulate why.

One more thing about 8 1/2 I want to mention, and it's definitely a case of  "last but not least":  the wonderful soundtrack by Nino Rota. The music that scores this great film enhances it so much. The Saraghina rumba, the eerie notes when Gweedo's remembering the spooky things his friends/cousins tell him about the priests and the statue, and best of all the triumphant, exuberant 8 1/2 theme that's repeated throughout the film and accompanies the final all-inclusive march all the 8 1/2 characters participate in at the ending, gradually getting more and more frenetic and then winding down to a few mournful notes and the little boy (little Gweedo, I always thought) saying goodbye.

I think anyone who loves movies and movies about filmmaking should see this great film.

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37 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

And the ending is perfect. I've always thought of it as Gweedo just throwing everything and everybody into the mix, a great big joyous parade. For some reason I find the final scene joyful and life-affirming. It just works, I can't even articulate why.

 

The ending was originally set on a train and much more downbeat (Criterion DVD/Blu-ray has a still photo of the scene).  Then Fellini changed it to the uplifting beach scene that we see today.  But Fellini does retain some of the somber mood he originally wanted: at the very end of the final scene, we see day turn into night, and the earlier large crowd of happy people become just a lonely figure, who exits the camera's view, with the previously joyous music fading away, then finally the film fading to black.

**** is, of course, Fellini's alter ego, and the film is fairly autobiographical.  About the only thing different is that while ****'s film fails, Fellini's film succeeds.

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Thanks, DVDPhreak.

Yes, I know the final part of the ending is not as upbeat as one would think. I did mention the final notes of the music, how it becomes "mournful". To me this is more effective than a completely unambiguous "happy" ending would have been.

By the way, I got around the idiotic AutoCensor by writing the character's name as "Gweedo", instead of the correct spelling. 

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On 9/4/2018 at 7:16 AM, Stephan55 said:

Belated response to

All I have to say to that is "Rosebud!" ;):D

"Asa Nisi Masa" Meaning
https://everipedia.org/wiki/Asa_Nisi_Masa/

Although the phrase "Asa Nisi Masa" has no translation in any known language — and Fellini never publicly revealed the meaning of the phrase — it is generally thought that Fellini used an Italian children’s game, similar to Pig Latin, to create it. In the game the syllables "si" and "sa" are added to existing words to obscure them, which Fellini does with the word "anima": A-sa + Ni-si + Ma-sa. The word "anima" has dual significance in this context; not only is it the Italian word for "soul" but it is also a key concept in the work of the Swiss psychotherapist Carl Jung (of whom Fellini was fond), where "anima" is the term for the female aspect of the personality in men, a common Fellini theme.

Like "Rosebud" in Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, or the madeleine in Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time, "Asa Nisi Masa" becomes a central plot point, a MacGuffin, as a gateway to crucial memories of the central character — even though it is itself peripheral to the central story.
 

What are other interpretations of the phrase "Asa Nisi Masa" as it's used in Federico Fellini's 8 1/2? Or how do you personally interpret it?

Christopher White, Italian film scholar and avid viewer of movies of all kinds, said the following:

"Asa nisi masa" is a play off of the word "anima" ("soul" in Italian), the sort of thing children do to words in English with pig Latin. It serves as a trigger for ****'s memories.
At the time the film was made Fellini was reading Carl Jung and regularly meeting with the Jungian psychoanalyst Dr. Ernst Bernhard. According to Jung, the anima represents the feminine aspects of a man's psyche and is part of his inner personality or the unconscious.
Fellini references the anima because of its association with dreams, creativity and, most importantly, its influence on man's interactions with women.

**** clearly has some issues there, and mention of the "anima" clues us in to the fact that we are about to get to know something about the protagonist's past and some of the experiences that helped make him who he is.
There are some interesting autobiographical elements in the sequence, for example the allusion to Fellini's grandmother Franzscheina (the old woman with the black scarf wrapped around her head speaking to **** in unintelligible dialect). The memory ends with the little girl telling **** that it happens to be the special night in which saying the words "asa nisi masa" will make the eyes of the painting on the wall move.
The sliver of light from under the door in the dark room and ****'s position on the bed hint at film projection and the art of cinema. It's an appropriate conclusion to the first in a series of memories that help **** get to the bottom of his creative and personal crisis."

(NOTE: Have no idea why the Autocensor thinks that **** (the name of the main charactor in 8 1/2 ) deserves to be **** ???? :huh:
So when reading the above just substitute  G u i d o  for the ****, geesh! ):wacko:



In Jan. 2009, Taylor Shelton played an original song on YouTube entitled "Asa Nisi Masa"
When questioned about the songs title he had this to say:  

"I first heard the phrase on Fellini's 8 1/2. I've never been incredibly familiar with what it means but  I've always thought it sounded cool. I think it's got something to do with femininity in males. Something about "Anima." 

 

Asa Nisi Masa (Original Song) by Taylor Shelton (oh, and please do not try to "steal" it) :rolleyes:

 

Thanks, Stephan for posting that explanation of "Asa Nisi Masa"! I had read the same information about the game and the word "animus" in a book on Fellini a long time ago, but felt it would only make my original post as long as the Magna Carta and we certainly don't want that. It is interesting though, and the cadence reminds me a bit of Klaatu Barada Nikto, or however that is spelled. Always enjoy your most literate posts.

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