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Actress Cicely Tyson among honorary Oscar recipients for 2018


jakeem
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The distinguished actress Cicely Tyson will be one of the 2018 honorary Oscar recipients, it was announced Wednesday by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

The 93-year-old acting veteran, whose film career began in the mid-1950s, has been selective about her screen roles -- preferring to play strong African-American characters. Among her credits: "Odds Against Tomorrow" (1958), "The Last Angry Man" (1959), "A Man Called Adam" (1966), "The Comedians" (1967), "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter" (1968), "Sounder" (1972), "Fried Green Tomatoes" (1991), "Because of Winn-Dixie" (2005) and "The Help" (2011). 

Also designated for honors at the Academy's annual Governors'Awards ceremony on November 18: the husband-and-wife producing team of Frank Marshall and Kathleen Kennedy; publicist Marvin Levy; and composer Lalo Schifrin.

Kennedy, who runs the mega-successful Lucasfilm Ltd. production company, and Marshall will be presented the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award for producing excellence. The prestigious award, last presented in 2010 to Francis Ford Coppola, goes to producers "whose bodies of work reflect a consistently high quality of motion picture production." 

Kennedy will become the first woman to receive the Thalberg Award, which is named for the legendary MGM producer of the 1920s and 1930s.

Image result for cicely tyson

Kennedy, Marshall and Tyson

Tyson, 93, received a 1972 Best Actress nomination for her performance as Rebecca Morgan, a 1930s Louisiana sharecropper's wife in the acclaimed drama "Sounder." The nomination occurred the same year that Diana Ross received a nod for her portrayal of singer Billie Holliday in "Lady Sings the Blues." It was the first time that two African-American women were nominated in the same acting category. They also were the first black actresses to be recognized in a lead category by the Academy since Dorothy Dandridge received a Best Actress nomination for the 1954 film "Carmen Jones."

Tyson went on to win two 1974 Emmys for her performance as a 100-year-old former slave in "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman." In June 2013, six months before her 89th birthday, she received a Tony Award for her performance in the Horton Foote drama "The Trip to Bountiful."

She is nominated for another Primetime Emmy Award this month for her recurring role as Viola Davis' mother in the ABC drama series "How to Get Away with Murder."

Tyson will become the latest cast member of "The Help" to receive an Oscar. She played Constantine Bates -- the elderly African-American woman who helped care for Skeeter Phelan (Emma Stone's character as a child).  

When the movie was filmed in 2010, the only Academy Award winners in it were Sissy Spacek and Mary Steenburgen -- both of whom earned gold statuettes for 1980 acting performances. Since then, four other stars -- Davis, Stone, Octavia Spencer and Allison Janney have won competitive Oscars. Spencer's award was for Best Supporting Actress in "The Help."

Image result for the help images

Tyson and "The Help" cast earned best screen ensemble honors at the 2012 SAG Awards 

Kennedy and Marshall, who have been married since 1987, worked with Steven Spielberg on numerous films -- ranging from "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981) to "The BFG" (2016). 

Kennedy, 65, has been nominated for Academy Awards as a co-producer of eight Best Picture nominees: "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial" (1982), "The Color Purple" (1985), "The Sixth Sense" (1999), "Seabiscuit" (2003), "Munich" (2005), "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" (2008), "War Horse" (2011) and "Lincoln." She became the head of Lucasfilm Ltd. -- which produces the "Star Wars" film series -- in 2012.

Marshall, who turns 72 on September 13, began his career working on projects with director Peter Bogdanovich. Among them: "The Last Picture Show" (1971, as a location manager), and "Paper Moon" (1973, as an associate producer) and "Daisy Miller" (1974, also as a production manager). He also was involved in the production of the late Orson Welles' last film "The Other Side of the Wind," which will be released this year. Since his association with Spielberg began in the 1980s, he has been nominated for five Academy Awards as the producer of "Raiders" and as a co-producer of the Best Picture nominees "The Color Purple," "The Sixth Sense," "Seabiscuit" and "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button."

hollywood-publicist2_custom-8d8dfb87677c7f7a6dd1406dcd16c37618aa9451-s400-c85.jpg

Levy

Like Kennedy and Marshall, Levy has had a long association with Spielberg. He engineered the publicity campaigns for "Schindler's List" (1993, arguably Spielberg's finest film and the winner of seven Academy Awards -- including Best Picture) and "Lincoln (another Best Picture nominee). One of his early successes was the campaign for "Walking Tall," the 1973 drama based on the true story of a Tennessee county sheriff named Buford Pusser. Filmed on a budget of $500,000, the picture -- distributed by Cinerama Releasing Corporation -- grossed $23 million domestically.

Image result for lalo schifrin

Schifrin

The 86-year old Schifrin, probably best known for his themes for the television series "Mission: Impossible" and "Mannix," has been nominated for six Academy Awards during his career. The Argentine-born composer received the nods for:

  • 1967 -- Best Music, Original Music Score ("Cool Hand Luke").
  • 1968 -- Best Music, Original Score for a Motion Picture (not a Musical) ("The Fox").
  • 1976 -- Best Music, Original Score ("Voyage of the Damned").
  • 1979 -- Best Music, Original Score ("The Amityville Horror").
  • 1980 -- Best Music, Original Song ("People Alone" from "The Competition). Shared with Will Jennings..
  • 1983 -- Best Music, Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Best Adaptation Score ("The Sting II")

If Schifrin's instrumental composition "Tar Sequence" from "Cool Hand Luke" sounds familiar, it's because it has been used over the years as the theme for television news programs throughout the country.

Among his other film scores: "The Cincinnati Kid" (1965), "Bullitt" (1968, although there's very little music during the celebrated  chase scene), "Kelly's Heroes" (1970), "Dirty Harry" (1971), "Magnum Force" (1973) and "Rush Hour" (1998).

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On 9/6/2018 at 9:04 AM, Hibi said:

Still no Doris Day, Liv Ullmann, Max Von Sydow etc.....

I don’t know about Ullman & Von Sydow, but I’ll bet Doris Day has been offered all kinds of lifetime achievement awards from every organization imaginable but has been reluctant to appear in public for 30 plus years. And most of these organizations want the recipient to show up if they’re giving them an award. 

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Turner Classic Movies traditionally does a salute to the Governors' Award honorees in January, but films featuring two members of the Class of 2018 are already on the September schedule.

"Sounder," the 1972 drama starring Cicely Tyson, will air Tuesday night at 10 as part of TCM's month-long series AAFCA Presents: The Black Experience on Film. 

Directed by Martin Ritt ("Hud," "Norma Rae"), the drama about the Morgans, a family of black sharecroppers in 1933 Louisiana, earned Academy Award nominations for Tyson and Paul Winfield. The film, whose title refers to the family's raccoon-hunting dog, also received Oscar nominations for Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay (for Lonne Elder III, who derived the screen story from the 1970 Newbery Medal-winning children's novel by William H. Armstrong).

In the early morning hours of Sunday, September 30, TCM will show "The Fox" (1967), which features an Academy Award-nominated film score by Lalo Schifrin. The film, based on a novella by D.H. Lawrence, will air at 4 a.m. Directed by Mark Rydell ("The Rose," "On Golden Pond"), the drama explores the relationship of two women (Sandy Dennis and Anne Heywood) who live on a farm in Canada. Keir Dullea also stars as the man who enters their lives.

 

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1 minute ago, DVDPhreak said:

A person may (a) decline the award, (b) be given the award but not attend the ceremony (e.g. Jean-Luc Godard), or (c) be given the award posthumously.  The same scenarios that apply to competitive Oscars apply to honorary Oscars as well.

Have they given a posthumous Honorary Oscar?

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18 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Have they given a posthumous Honorary Oscar?

Not intentionally. Edward G. Robinson was scheduled to receive an honorary Oscar to be presented at the awards ceremony in March 1973. But he died of cancer two months before that.

The award was presented to Robinson's widow Jane by Charlton Heston, who co-starred with the veteran actor in his final film, "Soylent Green."

 

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20 minutes ago, jakeem said:

Not intentionally. Edward G. Robinson was scheduled to receive an honorary Oscar to be presented at the awards ceremony in March 1973. But he died of cancer two months before that.

The award was presented to Robinson's widow Jane by Charlton Heston, who co-starred with the veteran actor in his final film, "Soylent Green."

Yeah, I thought that there was a rule against selecting Honorary Oscar recipients posthumously. Of course, that would only apply to the nominating and selection process, and if someone dies before the ceremony but had already been selected, the honoree would still be awarded.

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41 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, I thought that there was a rule against selecting Honorary Oscar recipients posthumously. Of course, that would only apply to the nominating and selection process, and if someone dies before the ceremony but had already been selected, the honoree would still be awarded.

In April 1961, the Academy voted an honorary Oscar to Gary Cooper for career excellence, but he was too ill with cancer to accept it in person. His good friend James Stewart accepted the award on his behalf and became emotional. Cooper's illness hadn't been made public, but people began to fear the worst. 

Cooper died a month later at the age of 60.

 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Have they given a posthumous Honorary Oscar?

Yes they have.  Visual f/x artist Chuck Gasper died in 2009 and was given a sci-tech award in the 2013 ceremony (video here), which took place in 2014, five years after his death.  The sci-tech Oscars are considered honorary awards as well, voted on by the board of governors just like the other honorary awards.  So the belief that a rule exists that forbids voting posthumously is perhaps not true -- or they have changed the rule since 2014, which I doubt.

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1 minute ago, Hibi said:

Audrey Hepburn died before she could accept her Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award. Her son accepted it for her.

She received a couple of other awards posthumously, too -- including a 1994 Grammy that enabled her to become the fifth person to achieve EGOT status.

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1 hour ago, DVDPhreak said:

Yes they have.  Visual f/x artist Chuck Gasper died in 2009 and was given a sci-tech award in the 2013 ceremony (video here), which took place in 2014, five years after his death.  The sci-tech Oscars are considered honorary awards as well, voted on by the board of governors just like the other honorary awards.  So the belief that a rule exists that forbids voting posthumously is perhaps not true -- or they have changed the rule since 2014, which I doubt.

Well I havent seen any awards for acting being awarded to dead people......(unless they die between the announcement and the award).

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16 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Well I havent seen any awards for acting being awarded to dead people......(unless they die between the announcement and the award).

The death may occur before both the announcement and the ceremony, as in the case of James Dean and Heath Ledger, among others.  If there is no rule forbidding voting after the death in competitive Oscars, it would be silly to have such a rule for honorary Oscars.

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I was talking about honorary awards. Yes there have been cases in the competitive awards. It was only in recent years that this has happened (from the mid 70s)...Winning awards, I mean.

 

As far as I know they have not given out honorary acting awards to deceased people, unless they die after the announcement.....and I doubt in any major categories also.

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On 9/11/2018 at 9:39 AM, Hibi said:

She wont show. But other people have been no-shows and got the award. I feel it's just an excuse. I'm sure she doesn't care, but it bugs me. Why would a 96 yr old woman want to travel to show up for an award?

As I stated in my previous post, I think she has probably been offered a Kennedy Center Honor or other national honors and has turned them down in the most polite way possible. I mean, I don’t know her or anything but an artist of her stature hasn’t been snubbed. I’m sure she has her reasons. 

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There are rumors she was offered the Kennedy Center honor years ago, but refused to fly there to attend. I'm not sure what the deal is with the Academy. They'd rather give it to someone like Godard who didnt bother to show up........There was a facebook campaign some years ago to get her an honorary Oscar and someone told me that got the Governor's dander up. I feel they just think she's just passe. I'm sure she doesn't really care about it. Especially at her age now.

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On ‎9‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 7:31 PM, jakeem said:

The distinguished actress Cicely Tyson will be one of the 2018 honorary Oscar recipients, it was announced Wednesday by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

The 93-year-old acting veteran, whose film career began in the mid-1950s, has been selective about her screen roles -- preferring to play strong African-American characters. Among her credits: "Odds Against Tomorrow" (1958), "The Last Angry Man" (1959), "A Man Called Adam" (1966), "The Comedians" (1967), "The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter" (1968), "Sounder" (1972), "Fried Green Tomatoes" (1991), "Because of Winn-Dixie" (2005) and "The Help" (2011). 

Also designated for honors at the Academy's annual Governors'Awards ceremony on November 18: the husband-and-wife producing team of Frank Marshall and Kathleen Kennedy; publicist Marvin Levy; and composer Lalo Schifrin.

Kennedy, who runs the mega-successful Lucasfilm Ltd. production company, and Marshall will be presented the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award for producing excellence. The prestigious award, last presented in 2010 to Francis Ford Coppola, goes to producers "whose bodies of work reflect a consistently high quality of motion picture production." 

Kennedy will become the first woman to receive the Thalberg Award, which is named for the legendary MGM producer of the 1920s and 1930s.

Image result for cicely tyson

Kennedy, Marshall and Tyson

Tyson, 93, received a 1972 Best Actress nomination for her performance as Rebecca Morgan, a 1930s Louisiana sharecropper's wife in the acclaimed drama "Sounder." The nomination occurred the same year that Diana Ross received a nod for her portrayal of singer Billie Holliday in "Lady Sings the Blues." It was the first time that two African-American women were nominated in the same acting category. They also were the first black actresses to be recognized in a lead category by the Academy since Dorothy Dandridge received a Best Actress nomination for the 1954 film "Carmen Jones."

Tyson went on to win two 1974 Emmys for her performance as a 100-year-old former slave in "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman." In June 2013, six months before her 89th birthday, she received a Tony Award for her performance in the Horton Foote drama "The Trip to Bountiful."

She is nominated for another Primetime Emmy Award this month for her recurring role as Viola Davis' mother in the ABC drama series "How to Get Away with Murder."

Tyson will become the latest cast member of "The Help" to receive an Oscar. She played Constantine Bates -- the elderly African-American woman who helped care for Skeeter Phelan (Emma Stone's character as a child).  

When the movie was filmed in 2010, the only Academy Award winners in it were Sissy Spacek and Mary Steenburgen -- both of whom earned gold statuettes for 1980 acting performances. Since then, four other stars -- Davis, Stone, Octavia Spencer and Allison Janney have won competitive Oscars. Spencer's award was for Best Supporting Actress in "The Help."

Image result for the help images

Tyson and "The Help" cast earned best screen ensemble honors at the 2012 SAG Awards 

Kennedy and Marshall, who have been married since 1987, worked with Steven Spielberg on numerous films -- ranging from "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981) to "The BFG" (2016). 

Kennedy, 65, has been nominated for Academy Awards as a co-producer of eight Best Picture nominees: "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial" (1982), "The Color Purple" (1985), "The Sixth Sense" (1999), "Seabiscuit" (2003), "Munich" (2005), "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" (2008), "War Horse" (2011) and "Lincoln." She became the head of Lucasfilm Ltd. -- which produces the "Star Wars" film series -- in 2012.

Marshall, who turns 72 on September 13, began his career working on projects with director Peter Bogdanovich. Among them: "The Last Picture Show" (1971, as a location manager), and "Paper Moon" (1973, as an associate producer) and "Daisy Miller" (1974, also as a production manager). He also was involved in the production of the late Orson Welles' last film "The Other Side of the Wind," which will be released this year. Since his association with Spielberg began in the 1980s, he has been nominated for five Academy Awards as the producer of "Raiders" and as a co-producer of the Best Picture nominees "The Color Purple," "The Sixth Sense," "Seabiscuit" and "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button."

hollywood-publicist2_custom-8d8dfb87677c7f7a6dd1406dcd16c37618aa9451-s400-c85.jpg

Levy

Like Kennedy and Marshall, Levy has had a long association with Spielberg. He engineered the publicity campaigns for "Schindler's List" (1993, arguably Spielberg's finest film and the winner of seven Academy Awards -- including Best Picture) and "Lincoln (another Best Picture nominee). One of his early successes was the campaign for "Walking Tall," the 1973 drama based on the true story of a Tennessee county sheriff named Buford Pusser. Filmed on a budget of $500,000, the picture -- distributed by Cinerama Releasing Corporation -- grossed $23 million domestically.

Image result for lalo schifrin

Schifrin

The 86-year old Schifrin, probably best known for his themes for the television series "Mission: Impossible" and "Mannix," has been nominated for six Academy Awards during his career. The Argentine-born composer received the nods for:

  • 1967 -- Best Music, Original Music Score ("Cool Hand Luke").
  • 1968 -- Best Music, Original Score for a Motion Picture (not a Musical) ("The Fox").
  • 1976 -- Best Music, Original Score ("Voyage of the Damned").
  • 1979 -- Best Music, Original Score ("The Amityville Horror").
  • 1980 -- Best Music, Original Song ("People Alone" from "The Competition). Shared with Will Jennings..
  • 1983 -- Best Music, Original Song Score and Its Adaptation or Best Adaptation Score ("The Sting II")

If Schifrin's instrumental composition "Tar Sequence" from "Cool Hand Luke" sounds familiar, it's because it has been used over the years as the theme for television news programs throughout the country.

Among his other film scores: "The Cincinnati Kid" (1965), "Bullitt" (1968, although there's very little music during the celebrated  chase scene), "Kelly's Heroes" (1970), "Dirty Harry" (1971), "Magnum Force" (1973) and "Rush Hour" (1998).

Always been my fav of *Newman   '67 among Hollywoods best years

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1 minute ago, spence said:

 

 

Back in the late '70's a local news station out o NYC used this as number as it's daily  intro 

NBiyt. & in yet another stupid *AMPAS winner, *Oscar winner over it's supurb music, was "Thoroughly Modern Millie?>_(Elmer Bernstein)

 

1 minute ago, spence said:

Always been my fav of *Newman   '67 among Hollywoods best years

 

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