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What movies did you rate a 9 or 10 this month?


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I've noticed that a lot of the films I recommend on this thread are British.

That wasn't a conscious goal, but it just seems to have happened that way.

So many great ones worth seeing.

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  • 1 month later...

"Red Headed Woman", starring Jean Harlow with Chester Morris, Una Merkel, Lewis Stone, May Robson, Leila Hyams, Henry Stephenson, and Charles Boyer is probably one of the films which gave reason for the start of the enforcement of the Hays Code.  You know what you are in for at the beginning of this fast-pace 80-minute film when Jean Harlow's character is standing in front of a sunny window after trying on a dress and she ask the store clerk "Can you see through this dress?"  The store clerk replies "I'm afraid I can Miss."  Jean Harlow snaps back without hesitating "Great, I'll wear it."  

Jean Harlow's character in this film is an ambitious gold-digger who lacks morals.  Jean Harlow uses sex in this film like a speeding locomotive going through bales of hay to achieve her goals, in this case, money and social stature.  The men whom she exploits in this film all seem too weak to say no to her or throw her out the door on her behind.  The writer for this film, Anita Loos, did an exceptional job in making sure the men in this film were susceptible to Jean Harlow's charms and also balancing the drama of her antics with comedy.   There is some physical abuse which Chester Morris' character inflicts on Harlow's character when he is trapped in the room with her but it didn't seem to bother Jean's character because after being slapped on the face she states gleefully "Gee, do it again, I like it, do it again." She suffers a temporary humiliating setback of sorts when Chester Morris goes back to his wife but that doesn't stop her at all.  

The last ten minutes of "Red Headed Woman" is probably reason why moralists at the time of the release of this film wanted the Hays Office to start enforcing the Hays Code.  How could any woman actually seduce a man three times, break-up his marriage, marry him, leave him for another man while still married to him, shoot him, have the charges dropped by the person she shot, be found in Paris playing the same con with her chauffeur boyfriend who is driving her latest conquest's town car/limousine as the screen fades to black she is smiling and happy and will not suffer any negative consequences from her past behavior. 

The moral message in this film is definitely negative but it is entertaining, fun and Jean Harlow holds your attention throughout the film.  There is a thread presently running called  "Intriguing Low Life Characters".  If there was ever a true example and picture of the lowest life character ever in a movie who gets away with everything it would be Lil "Red" Andrews.  For what its worth Jean Harlow is a definite ten and so is this pre-code flick!!! 

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I just looked over the list of films I rated on the IMDb in April. Most of the ones I watched received a score of 7 or 8 from me. But there were two that were high 8's which I could round up to 9.

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I was on a Giuliano Gemma kick and looked at a bunch of spaghetti westerns and comedies he made in the late 60s and early 70s. 

His comedies are a lot of fun. He's very athletic and has great dexterity in his fight scenes. He works best when they pair him with a brutish male costar, especially in gangster comedies.

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I recommend ANCHE GLI ANGELI MANGIANO FAGIOLI (1973) which translates as Even Angels Eat Beans. It takes place in New York in the 30s and there's a good American character actor in it, Robert Middleton. The other title I would suggest watching is CHARLESTON (1974) which is sort of a sequel, but features a different costar. These are both entertaining, highly engaging films. And Guiliano is at the peak of his motion picture stardom.

screen-shot-2019-05-02-at-8.13.17-pm.jpe

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13 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I just looked over the list of films I rated on the IMDb in April. Most of the ones I watched received a score of 7 or 8 from me. But there were two that were high 8's which I could round up to 9.

 

screen-shot-2019-05-02-at-7.55.14-pm-2.j

I was on a Giuliano Gemma kick and looked at a bunch of spaghetti westerns and comedies he made in the late 60s and early 70s. 

His comedies are a lot of fun. He's very athletic and has great dexterity in his fight scenes. He works best when they pair him with a brutish male costar, especially in gangster comedies.

screen-shot-2019-05-02-at-8.15.55-pm.jpe

 

I recommend ANCHE GLI ANGELI MANGIANO FAGIOLI (1973) which translates as Even Angels Eat Beans. It takes place in New York in the 30s and there's a good American character actor in it, Robert Middleton. The other title I would suggest watching is CHARLESTON (1974) which is sort of a sequel, but features a different costar. These are both entertaining, highly engaging films. And Guiliano is at the peak of his motion picture stardom.

screen-shot-2019-05-02-at-8.13.17-pm.jpe

Looks like a great movie.  Maybe TCM Programmer will take note and acquire the rights to show it as part of the "TCM Imports" series.  Maybe consider pairing the rights of this title with another title, "Rififi", which TCM showed a couple times a few years ago.

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King of Kings (1961)

A perfect example of "biblical epic". It's massive, larger than life and absolutely gripping. I'm not one for biblical epics but this one was amazing and glad I caught it from start to finish on the Easter weekend. Wasn't able to stay up for The King of Kings but King of Kings is definitely king. Sweeping score, acting, all the scenery, the final shot, massive cast and the poster. A movie so epic that the poster makes you think of Ben-Hur. Gave it a 9 at least, maybe 9.5 because it held my attention for it's massive runtime with no intermission.

king-of-kings-movie-poster-1961-10204987

God I love those posters.

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For April....

10

One Two Three (1961)

9

The Abyss (1989)

Hangover Square (1945)

Hollywood Cavalcade (1939)

I'd Climb the Highest Mountain (1951)

If Beale Street Could Talk (2018)

Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles (1975)

Men of Boys Town (1941)

My Bodyguard (1980)

Phone Call from a Stranger (1952)

Tea and Sympathy (1956)

The Three Musketeers (1973)

A Walk in the Clouds (1995)

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28 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

For April....

10

One Two Three (1961)

9

The Abyss (1989)

Hangover Square (1945)

Hollywood Cavalcade (1939)

I'd Climb the Highest Mountain (1951)

If Beale Street Could Talk (2018)

Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles (1975)

Men of Boys Town (1941)

My Bodyguard (1980)

Phone Call from a Stranger (1952)

Tea and Sympathy (1956)

The Three Musketeers (1973)

A Walk in the Clouds (1995)

Interesting group of films. Glad to see the one with Susan Hayward and William Lundigan mentioned.

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  • 1 month later...

I want to review a film released in June 1967, "Don't Make Waves", featuring Tony Curtis, Claudia Cardinale, Sharon Tate, Mort Sahl, and David Draper.

Tony Curtis gets involved accidentally, and I mean accidentally, with Claudia Cardinale when her car's bumper gets hooked onto Tony Curtis' Volkswagen bumper causing his car to roll down a hill and crashing down a mountain side on its roof stopping a small psychedelic bus of hippies and Claudia Cardinale's car.  Claudia is hysterical speaking in Italian when she lights a cigarette and throws the match in the direction of Tony's Volkswagen which has gas leaking and puddling around his car.  The car immediately goes up in flames burning everything Tony owns in the car.  Tony tries to savage something from the burning wreckage but the flames are too much.  His pants' leg catches on fire and he is forced to take them off while being doused with water by one of the hippies from the bus.  All he has left now is his underpants.  Claudia feeling bad for him takes him back to her beach house to look for insurance papers.  This is where all the fun begins.  Tony learns that Claudia is a kept woman gets thrown out of the beach house by her lover.  Tony finds out some information on Claudia's lover and tries to blackmail him by asking for a job selling pools.

This film is somewhat of a homage to what was left of this form of California culture and life before it would change forever. The times were a-changing.  After 1967 there would not be anymore beach movies featuring kids just hanging out.  The "Mod Period" had begun in earnest earlier in the year, kids were going to San Francisco to discover a new way of life, the Monterey Pop Music Festival happened the month this film was released in the United States.  The photography in this film is breathtaking.  I have never been to Malibu but the camera lens caught the landscape and beauty of what was Malibu at that point in time and it is breathtaking.  Speaking of breathtaking views I must pay homage to Sharon Tate.  She does not have much to do in this film but when she is on camera she does it well.  You first see her pulling Tony Curtis out of the ocean after he had been hit in the head by a surf board in the ocean.  After resuscitating Tony,  Tony gets a glimpse of his savior and he falls madly in love.  When Tony is being carried back to Claudia's apartment there is a shot of Tony looking back at Sharon Tate.  She is looking at him as the camera pulls away from her and she is just stunning.   Another Sharon Tate moment: Tony Curtis is having lunch on the beach and he is watching Sharon Tate jumping on a trampoline.  To see Sharon Tate jumping on a trampoline is equal to Marilyn Monroe walking away on a cobblestone street in "Niagara" and Bo Derek running in slow motion along the beach in "10".  That scene should be included in the greatest movie moments in Cinema history without question.  Another aspect which bears noticing is Sharon Tate's tan.  Her tan is the deepest darkest tan ever put on film.  Her tan was darker than her blonde hair and she did not even have tan lines when she was shown wearing a bikini. 

Mort Sahl has a small bit in this film and he may have been the smartest of any of the characters featured in this.  Mort Sahl was a great comedian of the 1950s.  He influenced comedians like Bob Newhart and Woody Allen.  I don't understand why if Mort Sahl was such a great comedian on politics in the 1950s why hasn't anyone like Woody Allen wanted to make a film or documentary of his life or the period of his life in the 1950s when he was a hot topic. 

Finally I want to dwell briefly on Hollywood movie stereotypes.   Sharon Tate had a boyfriend in this film.  The boyfriend was keeping Tony Curtis away from seducing Sharon Tate.  The boyfriend, played by Dave Draper, was a bodybuilder.  He was very muscular and strong.  He was shown picking up the back of the small psychedelic bus he and Sharon Tate lived in.  The stereotype which reared its ugly head again was all bodybuilders are dumb and prone to physical violence if crossed.  I wish this stereotype would go away.  I know a few bodybuilders, both men and women, who are smart, peaceful, rational human beings.    

"Don't Make Waves" is not a movie which you can rate in the top tier of movies released in the great year of 1967.  Its a "time-wasting" movie which does not require a lot of thinking.  You may laugh at a few bits but it is not exactly a bad movie.  I will rate it a "9" for the cast, Claudia Cardinale and Sharon Tate being the reasons for the high rating.  The Special Effects featuring the house tumbling and sliding down the hill rates a "9".  The Screen play for this movie rates a "5". The ending of this movie leaves much to be desired.  After the house slides down the hill to the beach and stops, Claudia and Tony run down the beach, frolicking in the ankle-deep ocean water before the end credits suddenly come on signaling the end of the movie. 

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Nice review on DON'T MAKE WAVES. It's been awhile since I've seen it but I do remember enjoying it. As you indicated, it's a rollicking good time, a pleasant no-brainer.

The stereotypes in this movie were more a dig at southern California culture.

Tony Curtis was always great at comedy, and when he's working alongside gorgeous actresses, there's even more reason to watch.

If you like this one, I would also suggest ARRIVEDERCI BABY, which Curtis made a year earlier. 

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No 10s in May or June. But plenty of 9s.... 22 (out of 77 seen) in May and 24 (out of 70 seen) in June 

May:

The End of the Affair (1955)

The Wife (2017/2018)

The Gypsy Moths (1969)

Mister 880 (1950)

People Will Talk (1951)

Yanks (1979)

Bullitt (1968)

Sunflower (1969/1970)

Close to my Heart (1951)

Exodus (1960)

The Rat Race (1960)

Marjorie Morningstar (1958)

The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972)

i Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978)

Comes a Horseman (1978)

Lilith (1964)

Stan and Ollie (2018)

Paris Blues (1961)

Noises Off (1992)

Lost Angel (1943)

Experiment in Terror (1962)

The Unforgiven (1960)

 

June:

Rio Bravo (1959)

Bad Times at the El Royale (2018)

One is a Lonely number (1972)

Johnny Guitar (1954)

Our Mother's House (1967)

Second Best (1994)

The Great Moment (1944)

The Shop on Main Street (1965)

Hero (1992)

the Circus (1928)

Lucky Star (1929)

Hoffa (1992)

Broken blossoms (1919)

Forbidden (1932)

A Taste of Honey (1961)

Movie Movie (1978)

Sundays and Cybele (1962)

The Rag Man (1925)

The Story of Esther Costello (1957)

These Wilder Years (1956)

over 21 (1945)

Toy Story 4 (2019)

The Mosquito Coast (1986)

The Wings of Eagles (1956)

 

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Image result for the big lebowski images9/10

A first time viewing for me, I am sorry now that I waited so long to see this cult favorite.

Jeff Bridges is The Dude, a slacker mistaken for a rich guy with the same name of Lebowski. He comes across many weird characters when the real Lebowski's trophy wife is kidnapped. I knew at the beginning that I was going to like this one when heard the narration from Sam Elliott's gravelly, weary voice. Way too many funny lines and scenes to mention. A great soundtrack featuring Bob Dylan, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Kenny Rogers And The First Edition. It almost makes me want to try a White Russian, though the thought of vodka, Kahlua and cream makes me nauseous. 

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In June, Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, gave it an 8.5 but I can see myself bumping it to a 9 as I was going inbetween the two numbers. It's charming, funny, great chemistry, delightfully mundane and not too outlandish, comfortable and it's just a fun watch in general but perfect for a Sunday afternoon.

mrblandingsbuildshisdreamhouse_1s_1200_0

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  • 4 weeks later...

July report.

10

City Lights (1931)

9

Billy Budd (1962)

Fear Strikes Out (1957)

One Desire (1955)

Home Before Dark (1958)

Ready Player One (2018)

The Green Room (1978)

Idiot's Delight (1939)

The Rainmaker (1956)

That kind of Woman (1959)

Things to Come (1936)

Primrose Path (1940)

Beauty for the Asking (1939)

Ransom! (1956)

Monsieur Verdoux (1947)

Wrestling Earnest Hemingway (1993)

Sparrows (1926)

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5 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

July report.

10

City Lights (1931)

9

Billy Budd (1962)

Fear Strikes Out (1957)

One Desire (1955)

Home Before Dark (1958)

Ready Player One (2018)

The Green Room (1978)

Idiot's Delight (1939)

The Rainmaker (1956)

That kind of Woman (1959)

Things to Come (1936)

Primrose Path (1940)

Beauty for the Asking (1939)

Ransom! (1956)

Monsieur Verdoux (1947)

Wrestling Earnest Hemingway (1993)

Sparrows (1926)

Did you actually watch all of these titles in July 2019?  Quite an impressive list.  "City Lights" is and always will be rated a "10" and a "Four Star" movie.  

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18 hours ago, thomasterryjr said:

Did you actually watch all of these titles in July 2019?  Quite an impressive list.  "City Lights" is and always will be rated a "10" and a "Four Star" movie.  

Yes indeed. Many others too. Admittedly, I often watch movies the way people pop candy, quite a bit of it.

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15 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Yes indeed. Many others too. Admittedly, I often watch movies the way people pop candy, quite a bit of it.

Well in my case it would be the way I eat my veggies.   

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

August

10

Testament (1983)

The Day of the Locust (1975)

9

Yesterday (2019)

The Fugitive (1947)

The Long Night (1947)

HM Pullham Esq. (1941)

Career (1959)

The Swimmer (1968)

Hot Spell (1958)

The Abdication (1974)

King David (1985)

The Sign of the Cross (1932)

Ladies of Leisure (1930)

Cry Havoc (1943)

Blonde Venus (1932)

Monkey Business (1931)

Platinum Blonde (1931)

Star Trek: The motion Picture (1979)

Desert Bloom (1986)

Once Upon a Time (1944, and seemingly one of the few to like it)

Catch-22 (1970)

Is Paris Burning? (1966)

Ask Any Girl (1959)

Ada (1961)

I know this seems like a lot, but I've seen over 70 this month, and I use the grading system kind of like the old newspaper four-star scale: a 10 for a 4 star film, a 9 for a 3.5, an 8 for a 3, a 7 for a 2.5 (which is the beginning of the failing grades), etc....

And if movie scenes could get scored, special mention then to She's Having a Baby, a 1988 comedy drama that went from a 7 to an 8 through an extraordinarily touching scene set to the heartbreaking Kate bush song "This Woman's Work" (a song robbed of an Oscar nomination). The scene itself is a 10.

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7 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

10

Testament (1983)
The Day of the Locust (1975)

9

Yesterday (2019)
The Fugitive (1947)
The Long Night (1947)
HM Pullham Esq. (1941)
Career (1959)
The Swimmer (1968)
Hot Spell (1958)
The Abdication (1974)
King David (1985)
The Sign of the Cross (1932)
Ladies of Leisure (1930)
Cry Havoc (1943)
Blonde Venus (1932)
Monkey Business (1931)
Platinum Blonde (1931)
Star Trek: The motion Picture (1979)
Desert Bloom (1986)
Once Upon a Time (1944, and seemingly one of the few to like it)
Catch-22 (1970)
Is Paris Burning? (1966)
Ask Any Girl (1959)
Ada (1961)

Nice to see some Hal Wallis productions on your list-- I also enjoyed the underrated CAREER as well as HOT SPELL. If you haven't seen some Hal Wallis westerns, I'd recommend GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL (1957) and LAST TRAIN FROM GUN HILL (1959). Both star Kirk Douglas.

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Just now, TopBilled said:

Nice to see some Hal Wallis productions on your list-- I also enjoyed the underrated CAREER as well as HOT SPELL. If you haven't seen some Hal Wallis westerns, I'd recommend GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL (1957) and LAST TRAIN FROM GUN HILL (1959). Both star Kirk Douglas.

I do have a library copy of Gunfight at the OK Corral at home waiting.... as for other Wallis productions, I tracked down a few Elvis films (King Creole, Blue Hawaii, Roustabout) at the library as well. Supposedly a rental of The Furies is coming as well. He was a great producer, just a bit frustrating though that some of his films are hard to find.....

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3 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

I do have a library copy of Gunfight at the OK Corral at home waiting.... as for other Wallis productions, I tracked down a few Elvis films (King Creole, Blue Hawaii, Roustabout) at the library as well. Supposedly a rental of The Furies is coming as well. He was a great producer, just a bit frustrating though that some of his films are hard to find.....

THE FURIES is excellent.

LAST TRAIN FROM GUN HILL is fun if you like seeing Kirk Douglas and Anthony Quinn interact. Plus Carolyn Jones and Earl Holliman are in it, and they always do interesting work. So if can locate that one, you'll be in for a treat.

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I rated a lot of films and television episodes in the 7-8 range this past month. But there were some that did get 9's and 10's from me.

***

Screen Shot 2019-07-13 at 3.43.24 PM

MURDER MOST FOUL (1964)...probably the best of the four Marple mysteries starring Margaret Rutherford. It's a solid 9.

BRIEF MOMENT (1933)...a lovely precode about marriage, from Columbia Pictures. Starring Carole Lombard & Gene Raymond. It amazed me how such a sweet and simple story could be so powerful. I felt like Lombard really believed in the material. It's probably an 8.5 but I rounded it up to a 9.

WHITE WOMAN (1933)...another Lombard precode, this time at Paramount. It earned a score of 9. She marries creepy Charles Laughton in this one. Charles Bickford has a supporting role and so does Kent Taylor. Lombard does well but certainly doesn't give her best ever performance. However, Laughton is magnificent. I felt like I was watching a master class in acting. He was never less than brilliant in all his scenes. The final bit with him and Bickford playing cards as the natives attack was eerie...and great, cheeky fun.

VIRTUE (1932)...Lombard again, back at Columbia, this time with Pat O'Brien. I gave it a 9. I love this film so much that I have decided to do a full-length review on it for the Essentials thread. Stay tuned! 

WHAT A WOMAN! (1943)...I was on a Brian Aherne kick and I very much enjoyed this film. Aherne costarred with Rosalind Russell four times, and I think this is their best collaboration. Definitely a 9.

CAMPBELL'S KINGDOM (1957)...one of my favorite Dirk Bogarde films. And he made a lot of great ones. A solid 9. The cinematography is outstanding.

CITY THAT NEVER SLEEPS (1953)...I had seen some of the beginning of this Republic noir, but had never really watched it all the way through. I'm glad I did. Innovative script, excellent photography and strong performances. It's a 10, no doubt about it.

ODDS AGAINST TOMORROW (1959)...it had been about five years since I'd first watched it. Forgot how great it is. Jlewis and I have already done a two-part review on it, which will be posted in the Essentials thread the second weekend of September. Definitely a 10.

OF HUMAN BONDAGE (1934)...I'm finishing this one now as I make this post. I had seen the remakes but never the original. A score of 9.

Screen Shot 2019-08-30 at 6.19.12 PM.png

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