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Andy Hardy and the Holiday season(s) ?


JeanneCrain
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Don't know what others may think but the Andy Hardy films seem to be a good wholesome fit for the Thanksgiving/Christmas holiday season.

As such, I for one would like to see these films become annual holiday season regulars...they are respectful "family" oriented classic films - perfect entertainment for family holiday gatherings, particularly around dinner time. ūüĎć

 

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6 minutes ago, JeanneCrain said:

Don't know what others may think but the Andy Hardy films seem to be a good wholesome fit for the Thanksgiving/Christmas holiday season.

As such, I for one would like to see these films become annual holiday season regulars...they are respectful "family" oriented classic films - perfect entertainment for family holiday gatherings, particularly around dinner time.

I think people who want to see noir and crime dramas in November and December would disagree with you.

Words like 'wholesome' and 'respectful' seem a little bit motivated by conservative ideals. Of course that's fine, but not everyone thinks classic film needs to be used to push conservative family values. And using Andy Hardy for that purpose seems a bit strange. The films should be shown because they are amusing, well-acted and have some artistic value to them. They should not be used to preach about wholesomeness and respectfulness. My opinion.

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I think people who want to see noir and crime dramas in November and December would disagree with you.

Words like 'wholesome' and 'respectful' seem a little bit motivated by conservative ideals. Of course that's fine, but not everyone thinks classic film needs to be used to push conservative family values. And using Andy Hardy for that purpose seems a bit strange. The films should be shown because they are amusing, well-acted and have some artistic value to them. They should not be used to preach about wholesomeness and respectfulness. My opinion.

Since we‚Äôre ‚Äúpushing wholesome, respectful‚ÄĚ TCM values, let‚Äôs added 1965 ‚ÄúPerversion for Profit‚ÄĚ to our Andy Hardy holiday viewings. ūüĎć

 

By the way, what kind of cynical characters ‚Äúwant to see‚ÄĚ CRIME dramas during their holidays‚Ķdon‚Äôt they currently have enough police and mass shootings of innocent citizens on their local nightly news programs? ūüėé

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41 minutes ago, JeanneCrain said:

By the way, what kind of cynical characters ‚Äúwant to see‚ÄĚ CRIME dramas during their holidays‚Ķdon‚Äôt they currently have enough police and mass shootings of innocent citizens on their local nightly news programs?

Atheist like myself.

 

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2 hours ago, JeanneCrain said:

By the way, what kind of cynical characters ‚Äúwant to see‚ÄĚ CRIME dramas during their holidays‚Ķdon‚Äôt they currently have enough police and mass shootings of innocent citizens on their local nightly news programs? ūüėé

These two films fit in perfectly with the holidays--

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY (1944) a Universal crime picture starring Deanna Durbin and Gene Kelly, both playing serious roles outside their usual comfort zones.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Holiday

And MR. SOFT TOUCH (1949) where Glenn Ford is a crook who dresses up like Santa and does a good deed for Evelyn Keyes before he's murdered.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mr._Soft_Touch

There's nothing cynical about these movies. They're very well made absorbing dramas. They show us not everyone's perfectly wholesome at this time of the year or at any other time of the year. They're much more realistic and meaningful than Andy and the Hardy family. Again my opinion.

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49 minutes ago, JeanneCrain said:

¬†ūüĎć

 

 

 

By the way, what kind of cynical characters ‚Äúwant to see‚ÄĚ CRIME dramas during their holidays‚Ķ ūüėé

 

-Me too......never been much of a Xmas junkie <_<

too much phony sentiment and unbridled capitalistic GREED

giphy.gif

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Never have liked Andy Hardy movies.

5 hours ago, JeanneCrain said:

Don't know what others may think but the Andy Hardy films seem to be a good wholesome fit for the Thanksgiving/Christmas holiday season.

As such, I for one would like to see these films become annual holiday season regulars...they are respectful "family" oriented classic films - perfect entertainment for family holiday gatherings, particularly around dinner time. ūüĎć

 

Never have liked Andy Hardy movies.  So, watching a movie instead of eating or while eating during a family holiday gathering?

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4 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Atheist like myself.

Well, Scrooge was an atheist.
(No, really, Dickens says straight out that he went back to church for the first time in decades after his conversion, after he discovered that most of London wasn't "Fools that go about with 'Merry Christmas' on their lips", and who treated the holiday as "An excuse for buying things of which one has no need"--And who should thus be the butt of self-amused jokes about being boiled in plum pudding, who should just let him leave the holiday alone, then, rather than knock on his door like Mormons and barge into his private office asking for contributions for lazy homeless people that his taxes support..."An expression that warned humanity to 'keep its distance!'")

Although clearly a Type 2 "Childhood-abuse victim" athie, from what we learn about his dad, and definitely some big ol' Type 1 after he lost his sister.

As for Andy Hardy Christmas scenes, none spring to mind...Of course, I haven't watched the series except for the public-domain-revival "Love Laughs at AH" either.  And that's considering that even "Meet Me in St. Louis" gets pegged as a "Christmas movie" despite only having one non-plot-essential Christmas scene in it.

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY is currently on YouTube. MR. SOFT TOUCH has aired on RetroPlex and occasionally turns up on TCM. 

Both of these films are feel good movies with a dark side and I enjoy them very much.    Sadly CH is from Universal and Mr. Soft Touch from Columbia so it is unlikely TCM will show them (but they did show CH when Durbin was featured a while back).

My favorite holiday film is The Bishop's Wife.     I find it very touching and the overall 'message' is a good one and handled in a lighthearted manner.  

 

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I remember when I was a kid the local channel afternoon movie would occasionally show

an Andy Hardy movie. I got kick out of them with the old time fashions and cars and

Andy's slang. They're still entertaining, but not as much as when I first saw them.

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

My favorite holiday film is The Bishop's Wife.     I find it very touching and the overall 'message' is a good one and handled in a lighthearted manner.  

 

Mine too, along with the Alistair Sim version of Dickens' A Christmas Carol. The rest (including It's a Wonderful Life) I avoid.

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2 hours ago, Hepburn Fan said:

No what? There you go again, trying to frighten me with your avatar. I do enjoy your creativity.

No to the idea of airing Andy Hardy movies, for whatever reason. Cinematic coal in the stocking. I consider Mickey Rooney one of the singularly most unpleasant movie stars in the history of the medium. Nothing but loud, obnoxious desperation. 

I'm not a Scrooge about the holidays themselves, but holiday movies are not my cup of tea. Those Hallmark month-long, nothing-but-Christmas 24/7 marathons sound like pure torture.

However, like jamesjazzguitar, I do like The Bishop's Wife. 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

No to the idea of airing Andy Hardy movies, for whatever reason. Cinematic coal in the stocking. I consider Mickey Rooney one of the singularly most unpleasant movie stars in the history of the medium. Nothing but loud, obnoxious desperation. 

I'm not a Scrooge about the holidays themselves, but holiday movies are not my cup of tea. Those Hallmark month-long, nothing-but-Christmas 24/7 marathons sound like pure torture.

However, like jamesjazzguitar, I do like The Bishop's Wife. 

I also cannot stand Mickey Rooney. I also dislike the Hallmark movies. I do have a lengthy stack of Xmas movies to watch each year‚ÄĒall of which I enjoy, and none of which involve Rooney. I also enjoy the noir like ‚ÄúLady in the Lake‚ÄĚ and even watching things not Christmas‚ÄĒbecause by Dec 25, you get quite saturated by everything Christmas.¬†

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I have to agree with you guys on Rooney. He can be irritating in some of those movies. I will always love Girl Crazy though. More so because of the Gershwin score than because of Rooney, though Rooney isn't particularly annoying in that one.

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11 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

.My favorite holiday film is The Bishop's Wife.     I find it very touching and the overall 'message' is a good one and handled in a lighthearted manner.  

 

Well, I like the movie OK, but I never thought of it being as "great" as  others seem to.  But then, we all  seem to have our favorites in this category.  And too, and also IMHO, there ARE worse "Christmas" movies than this one. 

But I don't see too, how ANDY HARDY particularly fits into a "holiday" theme movie discussion.  But too, I don't get how them being "wholesome" and "respectful family entertainment" makes them "perfect" for family holiday gatherings, especially since there ARE more holiday oriented classic films that too, are "respectful family entertainment" and "wholesome" too.   Especially on Thanksgiving.

Many of you might recall( or not) that this has been a pet peeve of mine for quite some time.....

Many of the "old guard", and "standard fare" or old "warhorse" Christmas movies ( 1951's "Scrooge" with Alistair Sim, and "It's A Wonderful Life" plus "Miracle On 34th Street", etc. ) were first seen by me on TV Thanksgiving day, usually after the parade.  And sometimes(for a few years) long into Thanksgiving night.  If not Christmas day themed movies, at least "life of Christ" themed flicks ("King Of Kings" '61;  "The Robe" etc.).  But for the last few decades, they've been sorely lacking on Thanksgiving day, replaced by just about anything( as one year I noticed JURASSIC  PARK scheduled one year, and THE VALACHI PAPERS another....)  So essentially, I see nothing WRONG with scheduling Andy Hardy movies.  After all, not EVERYBODY cares all that much for FOOTBALL.  ;)

Oh, and too, a local station every Thanksgiving would show the foreign short "The Red Balloon" after the parade, and BEFORE the "old standby's" I mentioned.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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17 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Many of the "old guard", and "standard fare" or old "warhorse" Christmas movies ( 1951's "Scrooge" with Alistair Sim, and "It's A Wonderful Life" plus "Miracle On 34th Street", etc. ) were first seen by me on TV Thanksgiving day, usually after the parade.  And sometimes(for a few years) long into Thanksgiving night.  If not Christmas day themed movies, at least "life of Christ" themed flicks ("King Of Kings" '61;  "The Robe" etc.).  

Since Black Friday wasn't really "invented" (no, why am I using quotes?--It was artificially invented) until 1983, I remember "White Friday", the day when it was official for TV stations to start showing Christmas movies.  WPIX-11 would always show the Laurel & Hardy "March of the Wooden Soldiers", some would show 34th St. or Bishop's Wife, and at least three local stations would start a month's worth of It's a Wonderful Life.

The reason was, everyone was home that day, kicking back, taking it easy, and recovering from Thanksgiving leftovers, and no football games were played, so it was necessary to start using that commercial time for airing Toys R Us ads. ¬†(sniffle! ¬†ūüė•¬†) ¬†Especially for¬†UHF stations that didn't have football teams to air, but had plenty of Christmas movies in their station package.¬†

And Thanksgiving night, of course, needed a three to four-hour family movie, to pre-program ahead of time, so that non-essential station employees could have the night off.  Some people consider it tradition for Sound of Music, E.T. or Home Alone, but I consider it heresy to watch Willy Wonka or Chitty/Bang any other day of the year.  

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Always enjoyed the Andy Hardy series when I was a kid.
Today they are kind of like comfort food to me.

Mickey Rooney was a dynamo, esp. during the 30's and early '40's.
After WW2 he sorta went kaplop (not unlike many prewar Hollywood stars.)

I generally enjoy his many short appearances in films like where he plays a young Gable in "Manhattan Melodrama" or the annoying kid in "Riffraff," and numerous support roles like in "Little Lord Fauntleroy," "Captains Courageous" and "National Velvet."
I think my favorite Rooney movies are "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," "Young Tom Edison," "Stablemates," and "Boys Town."

I admit that in some roles he could be embarrassingly obnoxious to me at times, like as Puck in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and in several of his later roles. But every now and then he would be given an opportunity to show his dramatic chops such as in "Requiem for a Heavyweight."

Still, I doubt that many would deny that (good roles or bad) the little guy stayed actively employed in the "business" right up to the end. That is quite a remarkable feat unto itself.

A film of his that I haven't seen since I was a boy and have some fond memories of is "The Atomic Kid." During some really scary times back then it made me think that it might actually be possible to laughably survive a nuclear war...
(Wish TMC would air it at least once before I die).

Regarding "christmas," I remember seeing an Andy Hardy short made during WW2 where the Judge put the "holiday" season into a somber perspective, giving young Andy some food for thought. It may have been used to sell war bonds at the time.
Maybe some people think of the Hardy series during "thanksgiving" and "christmas" because it is family oriented and fondly reminds them of their youth when (if they were lucky) life seemed simpler and appeared more wholesome to them.

Since those days (along with the loss of the naivete of my youth) I have grown ever more jaded and callous with the experiences of life.
I discovered that I am agnostic and find myself critical of most civil and religious "festivals" and "holidays."
Still, there is something comforting to me in many of those movies that I was so fond of as a kid. And Andy Hardy is one of them. It's sorta like sipping on a cup of hot cocoa, next to a warm fire, on a cold winter day. 

Movies have always been about escapism, in a fanciful temporary sense. And when reality is too insensitively harsh and cruel, like maybe it was for many during the "great depression" era, for an hour or two an audience could get away from all that in a movie theater.
Perhaps today is not all that different.

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A little off-topic, but why not relax and enjoy a few vintage images from the "roaring 20's" while listening to some suave music for a few minutes...
It may not put you into a "festive" spirit, but it might make you reflect on how far (and not) we've come since then.... Enjoy! :)

50 Vintage Photos from the 1920s (8.33 min)

 

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From previous discussions....

On 8/25/2018 at 7:49 PM, misswonderly3 said:
But noir  "Christmas" movies are not exactly typical heart-warming, feel-good family Yuletide fare; therefore I would argue that unlike such "regular" Christmas offerings, noir Christmas films would be a welcome change. And certainly they are not shown over and over again, to the point where even one's favourite "holiday" movies can wear a little thin. Also, since most noirs are, as we all know, , edgy, often dark (in more ways than one), and altogether the opposite of sentimental etc., they would not cloy a Christmas-film-weary audience; so I don't believe we'd tire of them the same way as with the usual suspects.

And actually, there are lots of noirs that, if not exactly Christmas -themed, are set at Christmas time. Just to name a few:

Christmas Holiday   and  Lady on a Train...ok, Deanna Durbin isn't exactly an icon of noir. But it's just a bit of a stretch to say that these two are at least kind of noirish, and they certainly don't get aired very often.

The Lady in the Lake:  Robert Montgomery's plucky albeit not always successful attempt at subjective camera; Audrey Totter's the best thing in it. Anyway, it takes place over Christmas and New Year's.

Kiss of Death:  Well, it's not exactly a "holiday" movie, but it does begin at Christmas time, complete with department store decorations etc. Victor Mature does a little stealing, but hey, it's just because he wants to buy his family some nice Christmas gifts.

Also - I could be mistaken about this one, but I think The Sweet Smell of Success is set over the week between Christmas and New Year's.  maybe not,can't remember....

Lots more, I just can't bring them to mind. Oh, honourable mention: It's not a classic era noir, but what about

L.A. Confidential?  It's a pretty darn good neo-noir, and it's set over the holidays. And hey, I have no problem watching Kevin Spacey in it. 

More Christmas Noir:     
Repeat Performance (1947), Cover Up (1949), Backfire (1950), Roadblock (1951), Crime Wave (1953), I, The Jury (1953), Two Men In Manhattan (1959), Blast Of Silence (1961),     

 

Some Christmas Neo Noir (there are a few more)

Warm Nights On A Slow Moving Train (1988), Delusion (1991), Hard Eight (1996),  The Lookout (2007). 

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