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Male stars drinking coffee or tea -- is it masculine?


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In the 1931 film DEVOTION we see Leslie Howard enjoy a nice hot cuppa. 

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I'm sure it's been done on screen by men in other movies. Actually it occurs often on soaps (British soaps definitely but American soaps too). On a recent episode of The Young and the Restless 25 year old Kyle Abbott was sitting in a restaurant sipping coffee from fine china. 

Maybe it depends on the genre. But wouldn't it seem out of place for Leslie Howard to have a brew if he was in an Ernest Hemingway type adventure yarn?

Interested to read others' thoughts...

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Just now, hamradio said:

Bonanza017.jpg

LOL...thanks, yeah, that's better.

On some western TV shows from that era we see men drinking coffee out of tin cups around a campfire, which seems more manly than Ben Cartwright using a china cup and saucer. Maybe we have to blame some of this on Hop-Sing...? 

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Cartwright was from back East so his tastes may have been a bit more refined than if

he had been born in a Nevada mining camp. Then he made a pile of money and was

at home with all things frou-frou, which is not to say Ben didn't like a good belt of

whiskey too. 

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American men drinking tea is ...a bit wonky. Brits have tea as part of their national culture, so it's of no moment. (on the other hand the Britons are not known for their manly physique).

In 'Gunga Din', his mates are outraged when Douglas Fairbanks Jr. announces his plans to de-mob and run a tea shop. But it has no connotation of effeminacy, just one of conventionality.

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My answer: It all depends upon the mug from which the coffee is being drank.

Mugs or cups that narrow at the bottom or that are bowl-shaped=not so "manly".

Mugs with their diameters that don't slender toward their base or that are cylindrical in shape=more "manly".

And, no matter what tea is served in=not very "manly".

(...although admittedly this last thought of mine about "tea" IS probably predicated on the old notion that Sarge commented upon earlier about those superfluous-u spellers over there across the pond)

 

 

 

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Coffee is somehow inherently more manly, I'm not sure why. Unless you're in a Japanese POW camp where even a couple brief dunks of a tea bag in lukewarm water, can save your life...

When it comes right down to it, all a man really needs is a smoke and a cup of coffee!

c1381e41fc3571381ce496083a5db279--sterli 

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In the 1980 comedy "Airplane!", Steve McCroskey -- the Chicago air traffic control tower supervisor played by Lloyd Bridges -- tried his best to get a cup of coffee.

But the off-the-wall controller Johnny Jacobs (Stephen Stucker) didn't get the hint. He always replied, "No, thanks."

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11 hours ago, Dargo said:

My answer: It all depends upon the mug from which the coffee is being drank.

Mugs or cups that narrow at the bottom or that are bowl-shaped=not so "manly".

Mugs with their diameters that don't slender toward their base or that are cylindrical in shape=more "manly".

And, no matter what tea is served in=not very "manly".

(...although admittedly this last thought of mine about "tea" IS probably predicated on the old notion that Sarge commented upon earlier about those superfluous-u spellers over there across the pond)

 

 

 

As any woman know's anything long and tall is more manly.....

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19 hours ago, TopBilled said:

LOL...thanks, yeah, that's better.

On some western TV shows from that era we see men drinking coffee out of tin cups around a campfire, which seems more manly than Ben Cartwright using a china cup and saucer. Maybe we have to blame some of this on Hop-Sing...? 

Not sure if that metal the cups were made was tin or not, but I found you DID have to be a "real man" to drink hot coffee from one of them( often see the same thing on the WAGON TRAIN reruns I watch) because when I got a set of; one porcelain coated metal coffee pot and matching cups as part of my camping gear, I'd like to have burned my finger to the knuckle putting it in the "ring" of the cup, it got so hot when really fresh hot coffee was poured in them.  Me and the ex had to fashion thick folded paper towel barriers 'round our fingers to be able to hold them and drink out of them.  ;) 

As far as coffee or tea being "masculine" or not depends.....

It's OK for men to still be masculine and drink tea in BRITISH movies, but still somewhat effeminate for a guy to drink tea in American movies, unless the guy is some old Uncle or something.  Makes no real difference since you rarely see ANYBODY actually drink any of whatever it is.  ;)   And too, notice----

Usually only HALF a cup gets poured into the cups anyway.  

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Not sure if that metal the cups were made was tin or not, but I found you DID have to be a "real man" to drink hot coffee from one of them( often see the same thing on the WAGON TRAIN reruns I watch) because when I got a set of; one porcelain coated metal coffee pot and matching cups as part of my camping gear, I'd like to have burned my finger to the knuckle putting it in the "ring" of the cup, it got so hot when really fresh hot coffee was poured in them.  Me and the ex had to fashion thick folded paper towel barriers 'round our fingers to be able to hold them and drink out of them.  ;) 

As far as coffee or tea being "masculine" or not depends.....

It's OK for men to still be masculine and drink tea in BRITISH movies, but still somewhat effeminate for a guy to drink tea in American movies, unless the guy is some old Uncle or something.  Makes no real difference since you rarely see ANYBODY actually drink any of whatever it is.  ;)   And too, notice----

Usually only HALF a cup gets poured into the cups anyway.  

Sepiatone

Yeah, they typically pour half a cup...they don't pause the dialogue long enough to finish pouring a full cup. The most unrealistic thing is when I see coffee shop scenes and they get something to go...a large cuppa with a lid on it...the way they carry the cups around, tilting them at a 45 degree angle, it's obvious just air is inside, no liquid, or they'd spill on themselves.

In America tea seems to be something little girls have at parties; or something older women drink when they relax, sit around and gossip.

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5 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Coffee is somehow inherently more manly, I'm not sure why. Unless you're in a Japanese POW camp where even a couple brief dunks of a tea bag in lukewarm water, can save your life...

When it comes right down to it, all a man really needs is a smoke and a cup of coffee!

c1381e41fc3571381ce496083a5db279--sterli 

"That's right, there Sarge. I know a nice smoke and a good cup o' coffee has always replenished my precious bodily fluids, anyway!"

(...yeah yeah, I know...different movie) ;)

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