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jakeem

Director Bernardo Bertolucci (1941-2018)

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The Italian filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci, who won Academy Awards for directing and co-writing "The Last Emperor" (1987), died of cancer Monday in Rome. He was 77.  

He also was known for several other cinematic achievements, including "The Conformist" (1970), "Last Tango in Paris" (1972), "1900" (1976), "The Sheltering Sky" (1990), "Little Buddha" (1993), "Stealing Beauty" (1996) and "The Dreamers" (2003).

Image result for bernardo bertolucci oscars images

"The Last Emperor" was the story of Pu-Yi (1906-1967) -- the last ruler of China's Qing dynasty. His reign was upended by tumultuous events of the 20th century. The drama starred John Lone as the adult version of the title character. Also appearing in the film were Joan Chen, Peter O'Toole, Ying Ruocheng, Victor Wong, Dennis Dun, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Maggie Han and Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa.

The film pulled off a rare achievement at the 60th Academy awards ceremony held on April 11, 1988. It won in all nine categories for which it had been nominated. The Oscar wins were as follows:
 
  • Best Picture (producer Jeremy Thomas).
  • Best Director (Bertolucci).
  • Best Adapted Screenplay (Bertolucci and Mark Peploe).
  • Best Costume Design (James Acheson).
  • Best Cinematography (Vittorio Storaro). 
  • Best Art Direction (Ferdinando Scarfiotti, art direction; Bruno Cesari and Osvaldo Desideri, set decoration).
  • Best Film Editing (Gabriella Cristiani).
  • Best Original Score (Ryuichi Sakamoto, David Byrne and Cong Su).
  • Best Sound (Bill Rowe and Ivan Sharrock).

The nine-for-nine sweep at the Academy Awards duplicated the feat 29 years earlier by Vincente Minnelli's 1958 musical production "Gigi." It won nine awards (and an honorary statuette for Maurice Chevalier) at the 31st Oscars ceremony held on April 6, 1959.

At the 76th Academy Awards on February 29, 2004, Peter Jackson's "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" received an unprecedented 11 awards in 11 categories, including Best Picture.

Bertolucci's most controversial film was "Last Tango in Paris," the graphic study of an affair in The City of Light between an American expatriate (Marlon Brando) and a young Frenchwoman (Maria Schneider). 

The film received 1973 Academy Award nominations for Best Director (Bertolucci) and Best Actor (Brando, one year after he rejected an Oscar for "The Godfather"). But the picture was a target for censors because of its sexual content. Bertolucci later drew the ire of feminists because of his treatment of his leading actress. 

Before her death from cancer in 2011, Schneider -- who turned 20 while the movie was filmed -- acknowledged that the picture had made her an international star. But she said it also ruined her career. 

I was too young to know better," the actress told London's Daily Mail in 2007. "Marlon later said that he felt manipulated, and he was Marlon Brando, so you can imagine how I felt. People thought I was like the girl in the movie, but that wasn't me.

"I felt very sad because I was treated like a sex symbol - I wanted to be recognized as an actress and the whole scandal and aftermath of the film turned me a little crazy and I had a breakdown.

"Now, though, I can look at the film and like my work in it."

In 2013, it was revealed that Bertolucci admitted in a video interview that he and Brando deliberately did not inform Schneider about a notorious simulated sex scene that involved a stick of butter. Bertolucci said he wanted her reaction "as a girl, not as an actress."

The revelation drew widespread criticism. "To all the people that love this film - you're watching a 19yr old get raped by a 48yr old man," tweeted the actress Jessica Chastain. "The director planned her attack. I feel sick."

Related image

Schneider and Brando in "Last Tango in Paris"

In 2003, another Parisian actress -- the smokey-eyed Eva Green -- attained stardom in a Bertolucci film. She appeared in "The Dreamers," the story of fraternal twins (played by Green and the French actor Louis Garrel) who bonded with an American exchange student (Michael Pitt) during the 1968 student riots in Paris. 

Green once admitted that she was wary of the film's nude scenes and Bertolucci's reputation as a taskmaster, but agreed to do the film over the objections of her mother and her agent. As she told London's The Independent in 2003: "I am very sensitive, a very reserved person and very shy, and this was my very first movie and Bernardo had this reputation for being...not Hitler, but quite tough with the actors."

In her experiences with Bertolucci, she discovered that his reputation was undeserved. "He was very sweet, a little Buddha," she said. "He's very wise. He can see through you. He can detect your weak spots." 

Ds6-lmZXQAAdvH0.jpg

Green in "The Dreamers"

 

This shot, and so many others, seared on the brain.

R.I.P. Bernardo Bertolucci.

Related image

A message from Eva on Bernardo Bertolucci’s passing:

"We are so lightly here.

It is in Love that we are made;

In Love, we disappear"

(quote from Boogie Street, Leonard Cohen)

My Bernardo d'Amour, Je t'aime

❤

Eva

From last tangos and last emperors and conformists to dreamers, #BernardoBertolucci created electrifying movies. His epitaph should be the epigraph from Before the Revolution: "Those who have not lived before the revolution cannot know the true sweetness of life." #RIP

THE CONFORMIST is one of my all-time favorites; I remember seeing it for the first time with my jaw on the floor. This original one-sheet, hanging in our living room, is one of my most prized possessions. Thank you for the mad and beautiful dreams, Bernardo Bertolucci.

"The Conformist" by Bertolucci, one of the Coen Brothers' favorite films.

Ds60rIcXQAEaMQu.jpg

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R.I.P. 

As a director I've seen and liked:

The Dreamers 
Stealing Beauty 

The Sheltering Sky 
The Last Emperor 
1900 
Last Tango in Paris 

As a writer:

Once Upon a Time in the West 

 

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5 hours ago, Swithin said:

shelter.jpg

The Sheltering Sky, a strange, beautiful film by Bertolucci.

They reference the “Winger tracking shot” in this movie in THE PLAYER, With the punchline attached that no one else Involved in the scene saw the movie.

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14 hours ago, jakeem said:

The Italian filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci, who won Academy Awards for directing and co-writing "The Last Emperor" (1987), died of cancer Monday in Rome. He was 77.  

He also was known for several other cinematic achievements, including "The Conformist" (1970), "Last Tango in Paris" (1972), "1900" (1976), "The Sheltering Sky" (1990), "Little Buddha" (1993), "Stealing Beauty" (1996) and "The Dreamers" (2003).

Image result for bernardo bertolucci oscars images

"The Last Emperor" was the story of Pu-Yi (1906-1967) -- the last ruler of China's Qing dynasty. His reign was upended by tumultuous events of the 20th century. The drama starred John Lone as the adult version of the title character. Also appearing in the film were Joan Chen, Peter O'Toole, Ying Ruocheng, Victor Wong, Dennis Dun, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Maggie Han and Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa.

The film pulled off a rare achievement at the 60th Academy awards ceremony held on April 11, 1988. It won in all nine categories for which it had been nominated. The Oscar wins were as follows:
 
  • Best Picture (producer Jeremy Thomas).
  • Best Director (Bertolucci).
  • Best Adapted Screenplay (Bertolucci and Mark Peploe).
  • Best Costume Design (James Acheson).
  • Best Cinematography (Vittorio Storaro). 
  • Best Art Direction (Ferdinando Scarfiotti, art direction; Bruno Cesari and Osvaldo Desideri, set decoration).
  • Best Film Editing (Gabriella Cristiani).
  • Best Original Score (Ryuichi Sakamoto, David Byrne and Cong Su).
  • Best Sound (Bill Rowe and Ivan Sharrock).

The nine-for-nine sweep at the Academy Awards duplicated the feat 29 years earlier by Vincente Minnelli's 1958 musical production "Gigi." It won nine awards (and an honorary statuette for Maurice Chevalier) at the 31st Oscars ceremony held on April 6, 1959.

At the 76th Academy Awards on February 29, 2004, Peter Jackson's "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" received an unprecedented 11 awards in 11 categories, including Best Picture.

Bertolucci's most controversial film was "Last Tango in Paris," the graphic study of an affair in The City of Light between an American expatriate (Marlon Brando) and a young Frenchwoman (Maria Schneider). 

The film received 1973 Academy Award nominations for Best Director (Bertolucci) and Best Actor (Brando, one year after he rejected an Oscar for "The Godfather"). But the picture was a target for censors because of its sexual content. Bertolucci later drew the ire of feminists because of his treatment of his leading actress. 

Before her death from cancer in 2011, Schneider -- who turned 20 while the movie was filmed -- acknowledged that the picture had made her an international star. But she said it also ruined her career. 

I was too young to know better," the actress told London's Daily Mail in 2007. "Marlon later said that he felt manipulated, and he was Marlon Brando, so you can imagine how I felt. People thought I was like the girl in the movie, but that wasn't me.

"I felt very sad because I was treated like a sex symbol - I wanted to be recognized as an actress and the whole scandal and aftermath of the film turned me a little crazy and I had a breakdown.

"Now, though, I can look at the film and like my work in it."

In 2013, it was revealed that Bertolucci admitted in a video interview that he and Brando deliberately did not inform Schneider about a notorious simulated sex scene that involved a stick of butter. Bertolucci said he wanted her reaction "as a girl, not as an actress."

The revelation drew widespread criticism. "To all the people that love this film - you're watching a 19yr old get raped by a 48yr old man," tweeted the actress Jessica Chastain. "The director planned her attack. I feel sick."

Related image

Schneider and Brando in "Last Tango in Paris"

In 2003, another Parisian actress -- the smokey-eyed Eva Green -- attained stardom in a Bertolucci film. She appeared in "The Dreamers," the story of fraternal twins (played by Green and the French actor Louis Garrel) who bonded with an American exchange student (Michael Pitt) during the 1968 student riots in Paris. 

Green once admitted that she was wary of the film's nude scenes and Bertolucci's reputation as a taskmaster, but agreed to do the film over the objections of her mother and her agent. As she told London's The Independent in 2003: "I am very sensitive, a very reserved person and very shy, and this was my very first movie and Bernardo had this reputation for being...not Hitler, but quite tough with the actors."

In her experiences with Bertolucci, she discovered that his reputation was undeserved. "He was very sweet, a little Buddha," she said. "He's very wise. He can see through you. He can detect your weak spots." 

Ds6-lmZXQAAdvH0.jpg

Green in "The Dreamers"

 

This shot, and so many others, seared on the brain.

R.I.P. Bernardo Bertolucci.

Related image

A message from Eva on Bernardo Bertolucci’s passing:

"We are so lightly here.

It is in Love that we are made;

In Love, we disappear"

(quote from Boogie Street, Leonard Cohen)

My Bernardo d'Amour, Je t'aime

❤

Eva

From last tangos and last emperors and conformists to dreamers, #BernardoBertolucci created electrifying movies. His epitaph should be the epigraph from to Before the Revolution: Those who have not lived before the revolution can know the true sweetness of life. " #RIP

THE CONFORMIST is one of my all-time favorites; I remember seeing it for the first time with my jaw on the floor. This original one-sheet, hanging in our living room, is one of my most prized possessions. Thank you for the mad and beautiful dreams, Bernardo Bertolucci.

"The Conformist" by Bertolucci, one of the Coen Brothers' favorite films.

Ds60rIcXQAEaMQu.jpg

Although 1987 HAD NEW MOVIES I WENT TOI & LIKED MORE THEN HIS 9  TIME SWEEPING *Last Emperor ($34M.) (***1/2) I did excellent that year in forecasting what HOOLYWOOD will do on Oscar night. & predicted it would take home either 7 to 8 but not 9. (TRIVIA: It's to date among the AMPAS' only (3) to make a clean sweep 1958's *GIGI & 2003's *LOR-ROTK)

 

(TRIVIA FUN-FAX)>-(you be the judge as to other 1987 films deserved to be either over it for BP, or in slots of the other nominees)???

*LAST EMPEROR

BROADCAST NEWS ($27m.) (****-stars!)

FATAL ATTRACTION ($157m.) (strong ***)

HOPE AND GLORY (3 & 1/2)

& WORKING GIRL ($30m.) (***)

 

& A few other notable releases for '87>

THE UNTOUCHABLES ($76m.) (4 BIG STARS & MY FAV OF THE YR) & I without question personally rank this heavyweight scoring by, yep again *Ennio Morricone's over *L. EMPEROR's

FULL METAL JACKET ($46m.) (****-stars & brilliantly made at every level! ridiculously it's only nod Best script?)

THE DEAD (4 STARS!) (I;m prejudiced here being IRISH, but at any rate it's absolutely marvelously crafted filmmaking at every turn & I always must include this dandy in my annual ST. PAT'S FILM FESTIVAL)

IRONWEED (strong 3 & 1/2) (Without a doubt among cinema history's most depressing movies! But, both *NICHOOLSON & *STREEP are magnificent here in 1938 Albany as hobos)

WALL STREET ($42m.) (strong ***) (all know this 1 of course, but most don't klnow it was *MICHAEL (Gordon Ghekko's) DOUGLAS' 2nd ACADEMY AWARD victory, winning for BEST PRODUCER-(Picture) for *ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST (l975)

 

GOT ANY OTHERS???      thanx

 

 

 

 

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On 11/26/2018 at 7:57 PM, shannon said:

 

THE DEAD (4 STARS!) (I;m prejudiced here being IRISH, but at any rate it's absolutely marvelously crafted filmmaking at every turn & I always must include this dandy in my annual ST. PAT'S FILM FESTIVAL

 

You don't have to be Irish to love The Dead, one of my five favorite films of all time.

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