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Crossfire trivia


Virginia Mrizek
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Just saw the movie "Crossfire" yesterday.  Has anyone ever noticed that when Mitchell is in the movie house talking with his wife, the music that is being played from the movie playing is actually the same music that Herbert Marshall is playing during the telling of the story in the movie "Enchanted Cottage?"  Don't know if the composer of music is the same for both movies.

Ginny

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1 hour ago, Virginia Mrizek said:

Just saw the movie "Crossfire" yesterday.  Has anyone ever noticed that when Mitchell is in the movie house talking with his wife, the music that is being played from the movie playing is actually the same music that Herbert Marshall is playing during the telling of the story in the movie "Enchanted Cottage?"  Don't know if the composer of music is the same for both movies.

Ginny

Good ear! You're right, it was the same composer-- Roy Webb. He was under contract to RKO, the studio which produced both these films. 

He also provided the music for Val Lewton's horror flicks, and those were made at RKO, too.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Webb

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45 minutes ago, Ray Faiola said:

Exactly. And real ones. RKO didn't have "Another Dawn"!!!!

In Eagle-Lion's CANON CITY (1948), the escaped convicts hurry down a street where there's a theater playing the Abbott & Costello picture THE NOOSE HANGS HIGH (1948), which was (no surprise) an E-L release.

It was a trend for studios to promote films within films.

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On 11/29/2018 at 10:09 AM, TopBilled said:

In Eagle-Lion's CANON CITY (1948), the escaped convicts hurry down a street where there's a theater playing the Abbott & Costello picture THE NOOSE HANGS HIGH (1948), which was (no surprise) an E-L release.

It was a trend for studios to promote films within films.

Yep, and according to its marquee, remember what's showing that snowy Christmas Eve inside Bedford Falls' movie theater as Jimmy Stewart runs past it while joyously thankful he was indeed ever born?

(...yep, another film that was distributed by RKO Pictures, The Bells of St. Mary's)

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On 11/30/2018 at 12:27 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

Tom Conway was an Eagle-Lion contract player as I recall

Tom Conway was at RKO as a contract star.

screen-shot-2018-12-01-at-2-40-40-pm.jpg

Eagle-Lion tended to borrow expensive stars from the main studios, in order to put their films on the map.

They borrowed Zachary Scott (from Warners); Louis Hayward (from Columbia); Martha Vickers (from Warners); Carole Landis (from Fox); Lucille Bremer (from MGM); James Craig (also from MGM); Arturo De Cordova (from Paramount); Sidney Greenstreet (from Warners); Turhan Bey (from Universal); Scott Brady (from Universal); Richard Basehart (from Fox); Virginia Mayo (from Warners); etc.

And they used expensive freelancers like George Brent, Robert Preston, Dennis O'Keefe and Robert Stack.

Eagle-Lion did have its own producers and its own directors. Bryan Foy, who was a prolific B-movie producer at Warners came over to E-L so he could make "A" films. And E-L had its own A-list cinematographer, John Alton, who worked on several noteworthy films like CANON CITY, T-MEN and HE WALKED BY NIGHT.

Eagle-Lion's main funding came from British investors who wanted to get British films into American theaters. So the Hollywood films E-L made were usually packaged as part of a double-bill with the expensive British dramas the company made on the other side of the Atlantic. It was a smart idea, however, they over-extended themselves financially. Instead of grooming their own stars, they paid too much to borrow established stars from the other studios and it ate up their profits.

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

Eagle-Lion tended to borrow expensive stars from the main studios, in order to put their films on the map.

They borrowed Zachary Scott (from Warners); Louis Hayward (from Columbia); Martha Vickers (from Warners); Sidney Greenstreet (from Warners);

And I have a rare uncut print of RUTHLESS! And the original trailer!

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