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Begone era of the Scrapbook


JeanneCrain
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Occasionally a classic movie will incorporate scenes involving scrapbooks containing photos, newspaper clippings, etc. to assist in telling the story...an element of classic story telling I will sadly miss along with news papers and their reporters, typewriters, landline phones and their ringing, cars without seat-belts, grandfather clocks, propellers on airplanes – all the surroundings that defined OUR era and generation of social and cultural interactions for merely brief moment of time…only to be remembered and passed on to the future by the preservation of our “movies” scrapbook. 😂

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1 minute ago, JeanneCrain said:

Occasionally a classic movie will incorporate scenes involving scrapbooks containing photos, newspaper clippings, etc. to assist in telling the story...an element of classic story telling I will sadly miss along with news papers and their reporters, typewriters, landline phones and their ringing, cars without seat-belts, grandfather clocks, propellers on airplanes – all the surroundings that defined OUR era and generation of social and cultural interactions for merely brief moment of time…only to be remembered and passed on to the future by the preservation of our “movies” scrapbook.

Interesting topic for a thread. But whose era is OUR era? That seems a bit vague. What generation's era are you referring to exactly?

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Scrapbooks! It's something I've been remarking on whenever possible, for the last few years. This facet of domestic life is rapidly disappearing --like so many other crafts and hobbies and traditions extinguished by the 'more efficient' internet.

I still have a handful of females in my acquaintance who devote themselves to scrapbooking and whatnot. I salute and applaud them.

In the same vein, I despise shuffling, mumbling, 'digerati' these days who possess no dexterous handskills at all --because throughout their day, the most they ever do with their hands and fingers is cradle and stroke their smart-gadgets. They don't even grasp the concept of creating something all by themselves. "Why?" Du'oh.

Something people don't realize is that not even digital media resists erosion and decay forever. Just because you transfer 16mm to a disc doesn't mean that disc is eternal. They make revolting and impersonal copies of our keepsakes and mementos.

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15 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

In the same vein, I despise shuffling, mumbling, 'digerati' these days who possess no dexterous handskills at all --because throughout their day, the most they ever do with their hands and fingers is cradle and stroke their smart-gadgets. They don't even grasp the concept of creating something all by themselves. "Why?" Du'oh.

You are right again, Sgt. and it all started going downhill way back when they took off the market the original Mister Potato Head, which required the child to use a real potato and converted it to a Mister Potato Head which was made out of plastic. Someone here once wrote a great expose about this tragedy. The plastic potato had pre-drilled holes and all the creativity was gone of putting the eyes in a bit crooked and making his nose longer or his mouth closer to the nose. All those crappy people now who have no talent thinking they do have talent and because they've been getting fake compliments from the parents for years about how brilliant they are, they believe it and think they are artistic because they created a version of the Mona Lisa from online images instead of picking up a paint brush and some oil paints and trying to do it in a manual way. Yeah, this current world stinks. Oh, by the way, Merry Christmas!

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9 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Interesting topic for a thread. But whose era is OUR era? That seems a bit vague. What generation's era are you referring to exactly?

Yeah, I feel generationally, we're a relatively wide bunch around here. For example, wearing seat belts was the law of the land by the time I was old enough to drive, although I certainly remember not wearing them my entire childhood and early adolescence. Propellers on airplanes? I'd have to look into the history of that. The first time I ever flew on a plane at the age of 15, it was the same kind of jet that's still used today.

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The first time I flew to Europe, it was on a TWA Lockheed Constellation it had curtains on the windows, four props and three tails. We flew from Idlewild airport New York to Gander Newfoundland where we had to top off the tanks, then flew from Gander to Shannon, Ireland, where we gassed up again, then from there to Orly, Paris. 😎

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7 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Yeah, I feel generationally, we're a relatively wide bunch around here. For example, wearing seat belts was the law of the land by the time I was old enough to drive, although I certainly remember not wearing them my entire childhood and early adolescence. Propellers on airplanes? I'd have to look into the history of that. The first time I ever flew on a plane at the age of 15, it was the same kind of jet that's still used today.

There was a new poster who replied to a comment of mine in another thread who said he/she was born in 2000. They asked why there were no 21st century films on the 31 Days of Oscar schedule. 

So yeah, there are people of all ages using these message boards.

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While many of the things the OP mentioned weren't part of my generation (e.g. cars I've ridden in have always had seatbelts and we never owned a grandfather clock), I can agree that I like the scrapbook scenes in films.  These scenes kind of go along with newspaper headlines and scenes with superimposed clocks (for example).  These scenes, with no dialogue, actors and such, can help progress the timeline or pass along an important plot point.  This is excellent storytelling as it "shows" the audience what has happened, rather than telling.  I especially enjoy the films that feature newspaper headlines, because the headlines are almost always sensationalized, which makes them fun to read.  I especially like newspaper films (e.g. His Girl FridayFive Star Final), because I like the hustle and bustle of the newsroom that is portrayed.  The reporter gets a scoop and has to run to the nearest phone.  The editor gets on the line and the reporter implores him to "take this down," the editor takes the notes, hands it to the nearest typist, with the order, "get this ready for print for the evening paper!" All of that is gone now, since with the internet, everything is viral within five seconds.  

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I'll surely take the previous situation over what we got now. Question: how many "emergencies" are you involved in, per year? Are you regularly losing limbs in this era as opposed to before?

And if its an "important" call why wouldn't you wait for it? If you can be reached so easily via phone, then the call must not really be important.

The whole convenience thing is so exaggerated. The absurdity of a global telecommunications network being built --and at such staggering cost--to help people cross a city street.

The fallout of this 'yen' for ease is ominous. Unfortunately one can't just have the one little bit of tech that one enjoys, and call a halt there ...its all or nothing. Just one example: what's going to happen to the service sector when automation turns them out into the street? Sears bankrupt, ToysRus bankrupt, the nation's last bookstore now threatened...pray tell what is the country going to look like when clerks & cashiers can't feed their families?

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https://tinyurl.com/yafl6eg9

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The technology that I am really happy to have is DVR.  I wouldn't be able to see anything on TCM that I want to watch if I didn't have it.  I can watch what I want, when I want, and I don't have to be annoyed that the movie I wanted to see is scheduled to air at 3AM. 

When I was in elementary/middle school, I used to program the VCR to record things that were airing while I was at school or asleep.  It was always a bummer when you went to watch your recording, only to find out that the recording didn't "take" or the tape ran out, or someone interfered with it at some point.  

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12 minutes ago, RBG FAN said:

Because I don't DVR, I am one who complains about TCM having only the Eastern feed on TV.

You really should consider getting DVR. If it's cost you're worried about, it only has an additional $10 a month fee on my Xfinity/Comcast cable service. DVR is indispensable for my movie watching, since even in the Eastern time zone most of what I want to see on TCM is either on too late or too early. They very rarely show anything that I haven't seen and am interested in seeing during primetime hours.

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I have the Hopper through Dish. It has a 2TB harddrive. I have almost 500 movies recorded and am at 80%. I will record Noir Alley films that I already own just to hear Eddie Muller’s intros and closing comments. I just delete it afterward. No big deal. I think you can record part of a program by adjusting the timing of the timers.  That seems overly complicated to me. It’d be easier to just record it and delete it when you’ve seen the part you want to watch.

I grew up watching Nick at Nite on a 13” b&w tube TV with a VHF & UHF dial. We had a cable box hooked to it. It was a big thing when my sister and I got a 19” color tube TV so we could play Super Nintendo and not monopolize the “big” 27” TV. 

I have the opposite problem from Lawrence. Much of the prime time features are on too early at 5pm. Noir Alley is on at the perfect time, 9PM Saturday. 

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The point is “our” brief moment in time i.e. our era/generation has experienced incredible growth and development relative to all previous eras/generations…as aptly pointed out by some of the examples that were commonly available and relied upon e.g. news papers, typewriters, landline phones, etc. that have been replaced and/or have become obsolete during our brief life experience…our era/generation.

Has such inevitable rapid change made our lives overall better or worse is a matter of experience/opinion…some changes have been for the better but probably not all for everyone as some here have pointed out.

For me, I haven’t interacted with any of the examples listed for decades and have merely taken a moment to reflect upon how I once routinely relied and/or associated with them as common fixtures of my life experience…now a begone time.

At times I keep trying to hold on to yesterday, which is easily done by watching TCM classics…as all those begone fixtures listed will remain encapsulated within the recorded history of movies.

For better or worse the important part of “our” era/generation was to actually experience through our brief moment in life so much rapid change and advancements that completely altered the way we live our lives…as TCM and its “scrap book” of classic movies continually remind us…how common living was perhaps at times for the better and/or worse.

Note: I view a DVR as a entertainment time machine…since my time is precious I almost always record my television programming before viewing it particularly live television such as news and sports…utilizing the fast forward option to eliminate time consuming and unwanted commercials, etc., I also appreciate and utilize the digital advancements in music and photography.

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I noticed a few years ago that the L.L. Bean catalog had a snowball making kit with a

little plastic scoop and other things that would produce the perfect snowball. I had

to LOL when I first saw it. It hasn't been in the recent catalogs so maybe kids can

still make snowballs on their own.

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Indeed RBGfan, check out the solid motor and metal component castings along with the intricate wood-grain craftsmanship cabinetry incorporated in that piece – home as well as commercial built quality unlike the mass produced junk made today…in china! A fine example of our history when pride, detail, longevity and practical use was encapsulated into a component hosting appealing artistic crafted beauty.

Reminiscent of the first vehicle I drove, a 1949 Ford Pickup with a “granny” first gear you had to “double clutch” to synchronize the gears before shifting - equipped with metal fenders so thick and solid you could jump on them without denting.

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