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TCM Remembers 2018


Feego
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TCM's annual In Memoriam tribute.  Some really surprising exclusions this year include Jerry Van Dyke, Connie Sawyer (who was just interviewed on TCM last year), and actress Mary Carlisle, who only just a few weeks ago was the subject of a primetime lineup.  The song is “When The Night Is Over" by Lord Huron.

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Another surprising omission is Allyn McLerie, who played Doris Day's pal in Calamity Jane.  She also appeared in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? and Jeremiah Johnson.  I know they can't include everyone, and they're not all household names, but some of these omissions seemed to be right up TCM's alley.

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William Phipps, the voice of Prince Charming in Cinderella and Leroy in Crossfire, was also omitted. I would think they'd include him since TCM plays Crossfire on a regular basis (and I even gave Leroy the last name of Houska in my mind.) Here's a song from Cinderella to remember him by.

 

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I thought it was cool how the tribute took me on a journey around town to familiar places like the candy store and the movie theater. The fireworks were a nice touch.

What I didn't like, though, was the song choice. It sounded like a song the Goo Goo Dolls rejected. With that being said, the Goo Goo Dolls song, "Name", would've been a much better song choice in my opinion.

 

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The omissions of Allyn Ann McLerie and Mary Carlisle are sad.

McLerie had roles in Calamity Jane, The Desert Song, Where's Charley, Phantom of the Rue Morgue, They Shoot Horses Don't They, Jeremiah Johnson, The Way We Were,  and a whole bunch on TV work.

Carlisle had more than 60 film credits up to 1943.

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No one asked for "everyone." But I'm sure they keep a running list as the year goes on. Carlisle, McLerie, and Rae were prominent players. Since there's no time restraint, there's no reason they couldn't add these people and the others that have been mentioned. Need more time? Play a longer song.

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TCM may have excluded some folks who made major contributions over the years, but I have to say that without a doubt they have the best and in most years the most creative In Memoriam segment of any media outlet, and that includes the Academy Awards, the SAG Awards, the Golden Globes and the Emmy's.

At least TCM does not have one singer sitting up on a stage singing some song with a smaller than average photo or video barely recognizable behind the singer...

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34 minutes ago, fxreyman said:

TCM may have excluded some folks who made major contributions over the years, but I have to say that without a doubt they have the best and in most years the most creative In Memoriam segment of any media outlet, and that includes the Academy Awards, the SAG Awards, the Golden Globes and the Emmy's.

At least TCM does not have one singer sitting up on a stage singing some song with a smaller than average photo or video barely recognizable behind the singer...

I agree that TCM always has the best memoriam tribute and also includes the most people.  While it's understandable that no organization can include everyone who passed in a given year (you'd probably have to devote a full half hour to do so), I think it's TCM's consistent greatness that leads to our disappointment when they do inevitably leave people out.  We know that the Oscars, SAGs and Emmys play favorites and are more constrained by time, and so it's simply expected that they're going to leave out a ton of notable people.  So yes, in spite of some disappointments, I'm always appreciative of the TCM Remembers video for being the best of the bunch.

In regards to your last point, it's staggering how increasingly unimaginative the Oscar memoriam becomes year after year.  If you go back to the 90s, they had some great video montages with excellent clips.  Now it looks more like a high school PowerPoint presentation with nothing but still photos and no clips to identify the behind-the-scenes folks by.  Last year when they showed John G. Avildsen at the Oscars, I wonder how many people at home realized he was the director of Rocky and The Karate Kid, or that John Mollo designed the costumes for Star Wars.  Is it really that much trouble for an awards show that is dedicated to celebrating film to include actual film clips during their tribute?

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On 12/15/2018 at 10:46 AM, fxreyman said:

They can't include everyone who died...

 

3 hours ago, Feego said:

  We know that the Oscars, SAGs and Emmys play favorites and are more constrained by time,

 

But, this isn't constrained by time. This is not the Oscars. YouTube can host videos several hours long. And TCM makes their own schedule, no commercials. They have the time.

Why not make two. The short one as posted above. And another more long form maybe 20 mins. They always need filler in between movies. Long enough to include more people and the scenes they are known for.

And show different years, not just the just passed year. And not just in Dec/Jan. Even though its a passing, its still a celebration of movie stars. It still reminds you of the times when they graced the screen. It has value. It still makes you want to watch the film one more time to see that actor in that scene.

I think this is a very under utilized resource.

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Not sure what the answer is to including more people, but one thought is to have a longer program and actually schedule when it will be shown.  Sort of like they do with shorts.  Right now you never know when TCM Remembers is gong to be shown so I just watch on TCM.com.  

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I am not sure how much time TCM has to organize and showcase as many "movie" people as they can to run one of these TCM Remember spots. They may have a set time to run them, lets say 5 minutes or less and they probably have a hard time getting actual movie clips to show, or at least a hard time finding actual "high quality" clips to show considering some of these people's last on screen clips are so old that the original film could have been destroyed or are in very bad shape. I for one like the shorter rememberances. I think something running longer, lets say 20 minutes or so could include actual narration of the person's career, or family life outside of their work in the industry. But in order to do that TCM would probably have to wait to film that in January and maybe run it in February, considering it would take time to set something like that up.

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I havent seen it yet, but Carlisle is a head scratcher, particularly since they devoted a whole night of her films to honor her passing. VERY STRANGE.

I wonder who will die between now and Jan. 1st.?? Usually someone prominent does. I wish they'd wait till Jan to do this stuff........

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41 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I havent seen it yet, but Carlisle is a head scratcher, particularly since they devoted a whole night of her films to honor her passing. VERY STRANGE.

I wonder who will die between now and Jan. 1st.?? Usually someone prominent does. I wish they'd wait till Jan to do this stuff........

It's almost as if different departments within TCM do different things and there's no communication among them. The omission of Mary Carlisle is indeed very strange.

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