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No Female Students in Blackboard Jungle High School?


sewhite2000
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Was that commonplace in the '50s? I've read about some girls-only schools in modern times to focus on science, technology and math, subjects in which female students are still dramatically underrepresented in going on to get jobs in that field. But I never heard of a male student-only public high school in the '50s. I've seen this movie any number of times, but I guess this was the first time it dawned on me there were no female students.

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WAIT a sec here, sewhite!

What. You think any nice young lady would look forward to goin' to school each day where there's punks like THIS guy here?...

250px-Vic_Morrow_in_Blackboard_Jungle_Tr

;)

(...but yeah, I've often wondered about this myself...I don't recall anywhere in the film where this is explained, as I would also assume coeducational public schools would have been the norm in NYC during this time, and as I recall, nowhere in the film is it made clear that the school was considered of the "reform" variety)

 

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22 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Nevertheless --I can tell you-- that it was unspoken practice even in public school systems to lump all the troublesome kids together in one building. Maybe that's the context here.

So, you "can tell us" this FIRST HAND maybe, Sarge?! Then I gotta know.

Which character did you always identify with the most while watchin' this flick? Paul Mazursky's, Jamie Farr's or maybe even Sidney Poitier's???

(...and PLEASE don't tell me Vic Morrow's, 'cause THEN I'm gonna have a whole NEW image in my mind about ya here, dude!!!) ;)

LOL

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Great observation. It's been years since I saw ****, but it IS glaringly obvious there's no girls! 

I'm an elementary teacher and the gorgeous old building (ca 1910) where I work has separate entrances marked "Boys" and "Girls" in stone over the doorways, although no one notices.

Wonder what THAT was all about?

(guess you can't abbreviate Blackboard Jungle)

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11 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I guess I can't discuss who sang the Oscar-winning song from Butch Cassidy without getting censored!

LOL

And so yeah, sewhite, I wouldn't get..ahem..hooked on a feeling of doing that if I were you.

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20 minutes ago, papyrusbeetle said:

I think this might be answered by someone familiar with the EXTREME far corners of the New York City public school system, in the 1950's.

It's kind of a law unto itself....

Yeah, probably.

But then again, the Sarge here has so far failed to expand upon his own personal experiences in these regards he said HE had back in the day, remember?!

(...amazing how some people will clam up soon after spilling the beans on themselves, isn't it)  ;)

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14 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Nevertheless --I can tell you-- that it was unspoken practice even in public school systems to lump all the troublesome kids together in one building. Maybe that's the context here.

My sister had a life-long crush on Rafael Campos from the film. I told her he was a punk who would treat her badly and at least trade your crush for Jameel Farrar. Not sure that's how Klinger spelled it back then. At least if sis would have fallen for him, she would have married into having two complete female wardrobes to choose from.

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This is veering off the topic, but as a Texan, I have to note how thrilled (and a little confused) I was as a kid that Farr was always wearing a Texas Rangers baseball cap in the latter years of M*A*S*H, after he stopped wearing the dresses, a team that didn't even come into existence until almost 20 years after the Korean War ended. It was supposed to be Toledo Mudhens cap, but come on, all of us around here knew what it was. That was the best the prop department could come up with, apparently.

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On 12/15/2018 at 12:10 PM, sewhite2000 said:

I guess I can't discuss who sang the Oscar-winning song from Butch Cassidy without getting censored!

Haha, there's a warehouse chain store here with that name. A Canadian friend who had never heard of it spotted the sign & exclaimed, "I want to go THERE!"

 

 

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On ‎12‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 12:56 AM, Dargo said:

So, you "can tell us" this FIRST HAND maybe, Sarge?! Then I gotta know.

Which character did you always identify with the most while watchin' this flick? Paul Mazursky's, Jamie Farr's or maybe even Sidney Poitier's???

(...and PLEASE don't tell me Vic Morrow's, 'cause THEN I'm gonna have a whole NEW image in my mind about ya here, dude!!!) ;)

LOL

my soulmate...

Image result for jamie farr the blackboard jungle

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On ‎12‎/‎14‎/‎2018 at 10:20 PM, sewhite2000 said:

Was that commonplace in the '50s? I've read about some girls-only schools in modern times to focus on science, technology and math, subjects in which female students are still dramatically underrepresented in going on to get jobs in that field. But I never heard of a male student-only public high school in the '50s. I've seen this movie any number of times, but I guess this was the first time it dawned on me there were no female students.

I guess it depends on where one grew up. I did in a pretty good size city in upstate New York and while the public schools weren't technically all one sex, many of the schools did keep the boys and girls separated for most of the day. Like the school building TikiSoo described, each school had separate entrances at different ends of the building and very clearly labeled "boys" or "girls".

As for BLACKBOARD JUNGLE, I think the film's writers used the "boys school" aspect more for dramatic reasons than as a true picture of what schools were like back then. 

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