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TomJH

The Intelligence of Birds

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1 hour ago, Gershwin fan said:

owlbaroo.jpg

This guy deserves his own emoji/ reaction. :lol: 😑😶🤒

 

Owl is trying to figure out the best pose. ;)

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Now I'm wondering if the 'Birdman of Alcatraz' was related to either David Janssen or Clark Gable

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On 1/27/2019 at 12:11 AM, hamradio said:

Guess this proves birds can be smarter than some people. :wacko:

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EXPECTING a response? :lol:

Didn't see this until now,  but yea,  this mother is likely dumber than the bird.  Maybe she believed the mate of the bird would respond to her poster!    (because the odds are high this is a wild bird, and if NOT, release it and it will return to its owner - My brother and I had pigeons when we were teens and once trained they always find their way back to the coop).

 

 

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The odds are even higher that the posted flyer was a joke that some people took seriously.

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27 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The odds are even higher that the posted flyer was a joke that some people took seriously.

Hopefully you're correct.   (and the person who created this flyer used someone else's daughter for that photo!).

My brother and I really loved those pigeons and we learned a lot about nature and birds taking care of them.   But sadly a neighbor's cat broke into the pen and killed all of them.   Oh,  the joys of childhood.

  

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Aw, terrible. Same thing happened when a subdivision was built in my rural neighborhood. Suburbanites let their pets run loose and wiped out my entire chicken & duck flocks. Awful. It took 6 months of therapy to get over it.

I've been watching videos of crows & ravens talking recently. I never knew they had better mimicking abilities than parrots. Bonus to the guy who trained his pet crow to say "nevermore".

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Aw, terrible. Same thing happened when a subdivision was built in my rural neighborhood. Suburbanites let their pets run loose and wiped out my entire chicken & duck flocks. Awful. It took 6 months of therapy to get over it.

I've been watching videos of crows & ravens talking recently. I never knew they had better mimicking abilities than parrots. Bonus to the guy who trained his pet crow to say "nevermore".

These articles may be a couple of years old but they still apply. Bottom line: if you like birds keep your cats inside. As more and more natural habitat for birds is disappearing as homes are constructed and people are allowing their house cats to roam (not to mention impregnating other cats), the impact is devastating for North American bird populations.

I don't blame the cats. I blame the cat owners.

Cats, the No. 1 killer of birds in Canada

Conservationists are urging owners to keep their cats inside, saying this could help save 200 million birds each year in Canada alone. 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/cats-the-no-1-killer-of-birds-in-canada-1.3130437

 

Cats kill up to 3.7B birds annually

Cats that live in the wild or indoor pets allowed to roam outdoors kill from 1.4 billion to as many as 3.7 billion birds in the continental U.S. each year, says a new study that escalates a decades-old debate over the feline threat to native animals....

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/01/29/cats-wild-birds-mammals-study/1873871/

 

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

These articles may be a couple of years old but they still apply. Bottom line: if you like birds keep your cats inside. As more and more natural habitat for birds is disappearing as homes are constructed and people are allowing their house cats to roam (not to mention impregnating other cats), the impact is devastating for North American bird populations.

I don't blame the cats. I blame the cat owners.

Cats, the No. 1 killer of birds in Canada

Conservationists are urging owners to keep their cats inside, saying this could help save 200 million birds each year in Canada alone. 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/cats-the-no-1-killer-of-birds-in-canada-1.3130437

 

Cats kill up to 3.7B birds annually

Cats that live in the wild or indoor pets allowed to roam outdoors kill from 1.4 billion to as many as 3.7 billion birds in the continental U.S. each year, says a new study that escalates a decades-old debate over the feline threat to native animals....

 

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That should make Woody Allen happy...one less rat with wings. 

 

Trivia...The rock pigeon is not  indigenous to the US.  Also are....

https://pqspb.org/bpqpoq/10-bird-species-introduced-to-north-america/

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I kind of feel the same way as Woody.

An entire gang of wayward pigeons have taken over the indoor area at my barn squeezing the lovely barn swallows to nest in other buildings. While the smaller birds will fly in the rafters away from us, when the pidgeons have fledglings they will dive bomb anyone in the arena. 

Our two barn cats rarely catch a little songbird, nor even the ground nesting killdeer on the property. Even though it skeezes me to see it, I feel the cat has done us all a favor when it takes a nuisance pigeon or two.

I make sure my feeders are safe from predators high & low.

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There are 3 billion fewer birds in North America than there were in 1970

If you've noticed fewer birds in your backyard than you used to, you're not mistaken.

North America has lost nearly 3 billion birds since 1970, a study said Thursday, which also found significant population declines among hundreds of bird species, including those once considered plentiful.

Overall, bird populations in the United States and Canada have declined by 29% in the past 50 years, according to the study, which authors say is a sign of a widespread ecological crisis.

"Multiple, independent lines of evidence show a massive reduction in the abundance of birds," said study lead author Ken Rosenberg, a senior scientist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and American Bird Conservancy, in a statement. "We expected to see continuing declines of threatened species. But for the first time, the results also showed pervasive losses among common birds across all habitats, including backyard birds."

The findings showed that of the nearly 3 billion birds lost, most belonged to 12 bird families, including sparrows, warblers, finches and swallows. Overall, the drop was from about 10 billion birds in 1970 to about 7 billion now.

The cause is primarily habitat loss, as birds are losing the places they need to live, find food, rest and raise their young.

Other threats to birds include deaths because of free-roaming cats, collisions with glass, toxic pesticides and insect decline. Climate change compounds all of these problems and also accelerates the loss of the habitats that birds need, experts say.   

"These data are consistent with what we're seeing elsewhere with other (groups of animals) showing massive declines, including insects and amphibians," said study co-author Peter Marra, the director of the Georgetown Environment Initiative at Georgetown University.

Evidence for the declines came from the detection of migratory birds in the air from weather radar stations across the continent in a period spanning over 10 years, in addition to nearly 50 years of data collected through numerous ground observations.

However, not all species are on the decline. Some bird species, including raptors and waterfowl, showed population gains – likely because of focused conservation efforts and Endangered Species legislation, the study found.

Still, Marra said "it's imperative to address immediate and ongoing threats, both because the domino effects can lead to the decay of ecosystems that humans depend on for our own health and livelihoods – and because people all over the world cherish birds in their own right. Can you imagine a world without birdsong?"

The study appeared in the peer-reviewed journal Science.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/3-billion-fewer-birds-north-180100630.html

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On 2/9/2019 at 7:20 AM, hamradio said:

That should make Woody Allen happy...one less rat with wings. 

 

Trivia...The rock pigeon is not  indigenous to the US.  Also are....

https://pqspb.org/bpqpoq/10-bird-species-introduced-to-north-america/

The correct name is Rock Dove.  Native to Southern Europe, adjacent parts of North Africa, Southwest Asia.

We once had an extremely plentiful species of pigeon, the Passenger Pigeon.  It flew in flocks of millions , if not billions, that could block out the sun for days.  Indiscriminate hunting and destruction of its habitat led to their extinction a little over an century ago.  It was closely related to our extant mourning dove.

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On 2/9/2019 at 7:28 AM, hamradio said:

Another introduced bird to the US

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Another native species, our only native species of parrot (other than some that occasionally cross into southeast Arizona from Sonora) was the Carolina Parakeet.  Again, it became extinct @ 100 years ago.  The usual culprits: indiscriminate hunting. Habitat destruction; but also the pet trade.

Interesting by sad fact:  the last known survivors of both the Carolina Parakeet and the Passenger Pigeon each died at the Cincinnati Zoo in 1914.

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On 2/9/2019 at 9:18 AM, TomJH said:

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Well, the pigeon's karma came back to our barn cat-it died suddenly from an incurable respiratory disease caught from contact with a pidgeon. That'll larn 'em.

I heard the news story about fewer birds too. I still have big gangs of English sparrows & grackles, but fewer songbirds. I keep a bird/bee/butterfly habitat on my property with many nesting clutches all summer trying to combat the decline. The dog helps keep predators out.

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