Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Martin Scorsese's Favorite Films


CinemaInternational
 Share

Recommended Posts

This has been making the rounds on the internet in the last few days, thought it would be interesting to share (although it should be stated some of the photos are emphatically not safe for work; nudity on the thumbnails for A Bigger Splash and Bad Lieutenant). All were films that Scorsese went on the record for really liking. Its a list of almost 900 films; 800 were done before 1980, so it seems fair to share it here (though I am still baffled by Exorcist II and Problem Child, but that's a different story)

https://mubi.com/lists/martin-scorseses-favorite-films

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He's definitely gotten quirky in the twilight of his years. I used to respect him immensely but not anymore. You never can tell about these artsy types. For me, he went south when he started using clownish starbage like Leonardo Duh-Caprio in his movies; and the movies themselves have gotten increasingly self-indulgent. Wth is 'The Aviator'? Wth is 'Hugo Chabert'? Bizarre.

Anyway thanks for posting. Thoughtful gesture on your part citizen!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta say you'd think a guy responsible for making some of the better films in the past 4 decades or so would have better taste than this.

(...as it seems his taste in films runs pretty similar to mine overall, and I'm about as "middlebrow" as they come) 

;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ALWAYS LEAVE THEM LAUGHING??? Hey, I have a print but I certainly wouldn't say it's one of my favorites, not even in a sea of (Scorcese's) 900 titles. I'd yank that one and slip in ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN. And interesting he included the 1943 PHANTOM OF THE OPERA over the 1925 Lon Chaney version.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

This has been making the rounds on the internet in the last few days, thought it would be interesting to share (although it should be stated some of the photos are emphatically not safe for work; nudity on the thumbnails for A Bigger Splash and Bad Lieutenant). All were films that Scorsese went on the record for really liking. Its a list of almost 900 films; 800 were done before 1980, so it seems fair to share it here (though I am still baffled by Exorcist II and Problem Child, but that's a different story)

https://mubi.com/lists/martin-scorseses-favorite-films

Two films out of almost 900 that have small thumbnails showing some nudity? Whats the big deal? If someone was going to import this list into some kind of downloadable file at a workplace, then yeah, there might be a problem. But being that there has been no other comments about this, I think since it his own "favorite" list, I'd classify it as "art", which cinema is a major part of.

As far as his choices are concerned... well this is where subjectivity comes into play. These are "his" favorites. Who knows why he chose Exorcist II or Problem Child? Hell, if you were to view some of my favorites, you'd probably see some questionable selections as well. For instance... Chisum, Ice Station Zebra, Capricorn One, Crocodile Dundee, The Electric Horseman, and so on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah he might have chosen 'Exorcist II' for the use of doves or the high camera-angle on the balcony; maybe one of his ex GFs lived on the street where they shot that scene; 'Bad Lieutenant' he might really like because Kietel stars...who knows.

Unrelated: I see Scorcese lately has joined the ranks of Hollywood gurus offering 'master classes' (writing classes) to amateurs and wannabes, similar to James Patterson et al. Odd.

--Markoff

(p.s. 'Capricorn One' --I'm a big fan of that flick. It has TWO --not just one but TWO--of my favorite actor's monologues of all-time. There's only like, five such speeches on the entire list so this one film nabbing two slots is stellar)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kind of odd that Curb Your Enthusiasm is on the list. If it were a short miniseries or something like Twin Peaks: Season 3 that was structured like a movie I would understand it but Curb is really more of a TV show. It is refreshing to see X: the Man With the X Ray Eyes and Shock Corridor on the same list as Aguirre and Fellini. B films are often overlooked but many of them are very entertaining. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, fxreyman said:

Two films out of almost 900 that have small thumbnails showing some nudity? Whats the big deal? If someone was going to import this list into some kind of downloadable file at a workplace, then yeah, there might be a problem. But being that there has been no other comments about this, I think since it his own "favorite" list, I'd classify it as "art", which cinema is a major part of.

As far as his choices are concerned... well this is where subjectivity comes into play. These are "his" favorites. Who knows why he chose Exorcist II or Problem Child? Hell, if you were to view some of my favorites, you'd probably see some questionable selections as well. For instance... Chisum, Ice Station Zebra, Capricorn One, Crocodile Dundee, The Electric Horseman, and so on.

Mine would have Dr. No, Cannibal Holocaust and Conan the Barbarian. :lol: 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Yeah he might have chosen 'Exorcist II' for the use of doves or the high camera-angle on the balcony; maybe one of his ex GFs lived on the street where they shot that scene; 'Bad Lieutenant' he might really like because Kietel stars...who knows.

Unrelated: I see Scorcese lately has joined the ranks of Hollywood gurus offering 'master classes' (writing classes) to amateurs and wannabes, similar to James Patterson et al. Odd.

--Markoff

(p.s. 'Capricorn One' --I'm a big fan of that flick. It has TWO --not just one but TWO--of my favorite actor's monologues of all-time. There's only like, five such speeches on the entire list so this one film nabbing two slots is stellar)

Now c'mon here, Sarge. Are you sure the reason you like this flick isn't really more 'cause it's the only movie I can think of where one can watch O.J. Simpson getting his (ahem) 'just deserts' in??? ;)

LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Yeah he might have chosen 'Exorcist II' for the use of doves or the high camera-angle on the balcony; maybe one of his ex GFs lived on the street where they shot that scene; 'Bad Lieutenant' he might really like because Kietel stars...who knows.

Unrelated: I see Scorcese lately has joined the ranks of Hollywood gurus offering 'master classes' (writing classes) to amateurs and wannabes, similar to James Patterson et al. Odd.

--Markoff

(p.s. 'Capricorn One' --I'm a big fan of that flick. It has TWO --not just one but TWO--of my favorite actor's monologues of all-time. There's only like, five such speeches on the entire list so this one film nabbing two slots is stellar)

Please, do not mention James Patterson. Do we not have to see him enuf already on those cheezy tv commercials for his supposed novels?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/16/2019 at 7:20 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Wow, just read the whole list and thanks for posting this.

I'm gonna be serious for the first time in my life and say, gotta give Scorsese credit for having the guts and assurance to post this list. This odd assortment of films that many would rate as combining the highbrow with the lowbrow shows a man who is a true film buff and one who knows his stuff. The fact he is mixing stuff by heavyweights like Bergman, Lang, Bresson, Dreyer, Fellini with things many would consider tacky like by Tashlin or Bava shows that he sees quality where others might not and I applaud that. He has a giant group of early films that many would discount as being revelant anymore like He Who Gets Slapped or The Strange Love of Molly Louvain and it's great to see something like Day of Wrath be mentioned. We've got Chaplin of course on the list but how many expected to see a William Castle film. Good also to see something like Renoir's The Souterner and The River along with classics like Visconti's Senso, but then mix in some Hammer and Gilling, and a film a neophyte might make fun of like The Horrors of the Black Museum. This is a hearty brew by putting alongside such to some questionable films also those of Pasolini, Resnais and Wajda. Only a real film fan who's seen countless films would have things like The Saragossa Manuscript along with Bava and Wenders, whose The American Friend is a true classic but not as well known as something like Stagecoach for sure. For me, Scorsese has covered all the bases of what makes a film worth watching with this list, and I was really impressed with it though I can't say it is due to any special reverence for Scorsese since if anyone here had posted this same list, I would be just as impressed. Bravo to for him putting The Housemaid and I Am Cuba on the list. Whether one likes or dislikes some of these films or thinks they are worthy, it cannot be debated that this man is a true connoisseur of film and film history to my mind, which you are welcome to agree or disagree with as believed.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm totally serious when I exclaim my admiration for Hal Holbrook in 'Capricorn One'. He's always been a fine actor and in this innocuous thriller he was given superb opportunity to show his skill in single/long takes for speech-making. He nails it. Telling (astronaut) James Brolin that unless he goes along with his underhanded scheme that Brolin would be 'ruining American hopes'. Hoot!

And then incredibly, same movie, an even better monologue by--who would ever have guessed it--by none other than paunchy, frog-voiced David Doyle of 'Charlie's Angels' TV fame. He has a running gag with his hoax-obsessed reporter Elliott Gould in this flick--they constantly riff classic movie lines off each other--and then when Gould finally gets called on the carpet by Doyle its one of the greatest 'newspaper editor lectures his cub reporter' speeches ever.

This flick put Peter Yates' career back on the map. Its a clinic in action-adventure-comedy. But to find two amazing monologues contained in it as well....whew

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

And then incredibly, same movie, an even better monologue by--who would ever have guessed it--by none other than paunchy, frog-voiced David Doyle of 'Charlie's Angels' TV fame.

I'll try to rewatch your selection, Sgt. Markoff but I always get Doyle confused with Tom Bosley and fear I may find myself in the Cunningham's living room on Happy Days which is abhorrent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...