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Black Face in Mary Poppins


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6 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

I've often looked into the history of blackface due to the interest I have in early vaudeville. Its a fascinating topic with lots of not-generally-well-known angles.

Thank God for small favors!

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15 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

All it is is soot. Let's not make this into more than it has to be. Chimney sweeps would naturally be clouded over with soot. Soot is black. Nothing unusual there. I never took the scene as blackface.

Tell that to Admiral Boom (Reginald Owen) from the first movie. He fired upon the sweeps believing they were Hottentots. Guess he had a South Africa flashback.

 

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4 minutes ago, jakeem said:

Tell that to Admiral Boom (Reginald Owen) from the first movie. He fired upon the sweeps believing they were Hottentots. Guess he had a South Africa flashback.

 

Yes, BUT let us not forget what MADE the Hottentots so hot!

(...courage)

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Didn't read total posted article, but found this, in relation to the origin of the word "Hottentot".

And DARG!  Beat me to it, old boy!  ;)

The Khoikhoi[a] (updated orthography Khoekhoe, from Khoekhoegowab Khoekhoen [kxʰoekxʰoen]; formerly also Hottentots[2]) are the traditionally nomadic pastoralist non-Bantu indigenous population of southwestern Africa. They are grouped with the hunter-gatherer San under the compound term Khoisan.[3]

While it is clear that the presence of the Khoikhoi in southern Africa predates the Bantu expansion, it is not certain by how much, possibly in the Late Stone Age, or displaced by the Bantu expansion to Southeastern Africa.[3] The Khoikhoi maintained large herds of Nguni cattle in the Cape region at the time of Dutch colonisation in the 17th century. Their nomadic pastoralism was mostly discontinued in the 19th to 20th century.

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

All it is is soot. Let's not make this into more than it has to be. Chimney sweeps would naturally be clouded over with soot. Soot is black. Nothing unusual there. I never took the scene as blackface.

Well then CI, I certainly hope you're not now implying that SOOT would somehow be inferior to, say, dust or any other dirty substance to be found on earth.

'Cause if you ARE, then you DO know what that would make you, don't ya?

Uh-huh, a "Dirtist", or at the very least showing the signs of being an "Anti-Dirtite"!

(...yep, kind'a like what Jerry was once called by Kramer...an "Anti-Dentite")

;)

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6 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

All it is is soot. Let's not make this into more than it has to be. Chimney sweeps would naturally be clouded over with soot. Soot is black. Nothing unusual there. I never took the scene as blackface.

Agree

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7 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

All it is is soot. Let's not make this into more than it has to be. Chimney sweeps would naturally be clouded over with soot. Soot is black. Nothing unusual there. I never took the scene as blackface.

Dick Van Dyke's character even explains so, when the kids first meet him on the run from the bank--"Oh, a little dusty, maybe..."

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8 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

All it is is soot. Let's not make this into more than it has to be. Chimney sweeps would naturally be clouded over with soot. Soot is black. Nothing unusual there. I never took the scene as blackface.

Explain the entire episode to the so-called Hottentots.

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14 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

I've often looked into the history of blackface due to the interest I have in early vaudeville. Its a fascinating topic with lots of not-generally-well-known angles.

Fred Mertz appears in blackface in Harmony Lane (1935), a biopic about Stephen Foster. Fred (i.e. William Frawley) plays Edwin Christy of the Christy Minstrels. It's rather a good, low budget movie, with excellent performances by Douglass Montgomery and Evelyn Venable.

91HkX5OEb9L._SX679_.jpg

 

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10 hours ago, Dargo said:

Well then CI, I certainly hope you're not now implying that SOOT would somehow be inferior to, say, dust or any other dirty substance to be found on earth.

'Cause if you ARE, then you DO know what that would make you, don't ya?

Uh-huh, a "Dirtist", or at the very least showing the signs of being an "Anti-Dirtite"!

(...yep, kind'a like what Jerry was once called by Kramer...an "Anti-Dentite")

;)

 

You should see some of our coal miners.

coalminers.jpg

 

Maybe that's why some wants a ban on coal....miners looks so racist. ;)

 

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19 minutes ago, jakeem said:

I wonder when President Wilson will be screening "The Birth of a Nation" at the White House?

Image result for the birth of a nation

 In Woodrow Wilson's day of course there was no television. But he made up for it by screening " The Birth of a Nation " numerous times. Reportedly especially after he had a stroke it was the one thing that he was doing.

And now just a hundred years later we've got a president who's doing the same thing. Just watches  racist programming all day long.

It seems like I can recall that Woodrow Wilson said "The Birth of a Nation " was " history written with lightning ".

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