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cigarjoe

Archaic Expressions in Films

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Here's another

You'll hear in a film someone say that they were going to take a shower-bath.  Now I'll assume a shower bath was one of those converted setups where the house already had a, say a clawfoot bathtub and the owners then upgraded it by putting in a shower head with one of those rings around the top that held the new shower curtain. Hence it was now a shower and a bath. 

You could probably pinpoint the time period it was used in from the films obviously. I seem to remember Myrna Loy saying it in one of the Thin Man films.

 

 

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I think "Shower"  was shortened from "shower bath" over the years.  Like, how long has it been since anyone called the  automobile, which we for some time have simply called a "car"  a "MOTORCAR"? 

Sepiatone

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In H.M PULHAM, ESQ.  PHIL BROWN says to ROBERT YOUNG (about VAN HEFLIN) : "I always thought he was a long drink of water." 

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33 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

In H.M PULHAM, ESQ.  PHIL BROWN says to ROBERT YOUNG (about VAN HEFLIN) : "I always thought he was a long drink of water." 

That expression means tall-person and Van was only 6 feet tall as was Robert Young.

So I would say just a bit-above-average drink of water!

 

 

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22 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

That expression means tall-person and Van was only 6 feet tall as was Robert Young.

So I would say just a bit-above-average drink of water!

 

 

Oh, I know.  My mother used to call one of her girlhood friends as a "tall drink of water".  The lady was tall!  The expression doesn't mean just tall; it means uninteresting too, as in boring.  Or flavorless. 

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A thing and an expression. A Gas Holder or Gasometer.  Two of them  at the far right below

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and below alongside the Queensboro Bridge in the film The Unsuspected.

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I lived pretty close to the two in the top picture. We kids just called them gas tanks. They were located at the ConEd's Astoria power plant, and were  a part of  ConEd's  manufactured gas division. The  Gas Holders  got bigger or smaller depending on how much gas they held.  Operating from the early 1800s to mid-1900s, these plants used whale oil, rosin, coal, or a mixture of coal, oil, and water, to produce a gas that could be distributed and used as fuel.  The ones at Astoria used coal. However, some of the byproducts of gas production, such as coal tar (oily waste containing chemicals) are potentially hazardous to human health and the environment.

I don't think there is one these expansion type holders left anyplace in the US.

 

 

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Shower-bath reminds me of the auto-truck I saw mentioned in a newspaper article I read about my great grandfather - he took a bunch of people somewhere in his auto-truck.

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Odd’s Bodkins (Minced Oath Meaning “God’s Body”)

I Got Pinned (Hugo Peabody and I are Getting to a Serious Point in our Relationship)

And my personal favourite...

Ye Gods (An exclamation of astonishment.)

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Was watching a part of a 1945 Tyrone Power western "San Antonio" this morning mostly a dialoge driven story, but a Cavaly Officer says the below line about having to go put down a Native American revolt.

"Put the quie-at-tus on the wiggle-wag"

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An interesting related New York tidbit....

Corlear’s Hook was named for the hump of land that protrudes into the East River, Corlears hook is no longer a neighborhood and only a small park designates its existence at all. However in the 1820s, The Hook, as it was a wild place. 

Dance halls often served as brothels in Corlear’s Hook.

According to  Edwin G. Burrows & Mike Wallace’s Gotham:

“At Corlear’s Hook, Adjacent to the shipyards, coal dumps, and ironworks, droves of streetwalkers brazenly solicited industrial workers, sailors, and Brooklyn ferry commuters. So notorious was the Hook’s reputation as a site for prostitution that the local sex workers were nicknamed “Hookers,” generating a new moniker for the entire trade.”– Gotham

 

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I was walking down the street the other day and I saw this gorgeous young fit woman walking down the street with some middle-age man who looked like he was entering his third trimester and had taken one too many fist to his face.  I thought to myself what is this woman doing with a lug like that?  Why is she with him?  She ought to be hanging around with me.  Anyway, the term "lug" means a stupid, pathetic looking person.  

I was standing in a fast-food line with a co-worker who was born in the early to mid 90s.  The line was fairly long and I blurted out, "Instead of standing in this long line I wish we could go to an "Automat".  She looked at me with a puzzled look and said "Why would you want to go to a car wash for lunch?  An "Automat" is a self-service restaurant where after you deposit some coins or dollar bills you can open the small compartment and take out some hot or cold food.

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19 minutes ago, thomasterryjr said:

I was standing in a fast-food line with a co-worker who was born in the early to mid 90s.  The line was fairly long and I blurted out, "Instead of standing in this long line I wish we could go to an "Automat".  She looked at me with a puzzled look and said "Why would you want to go to a car wash for lunch?  An "Automat" is a self-service restaurant where after you deposit some coins or dollar bills you can open the small compartment and take out some hot or cold food.

Having seen them in movies, but never in real life, I always assumed they were only in big cities like New York.

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7 hours ago, thomasterryjr said:

"Instead of standing in this long line I wish we could go to an "Automat". 

I actually remember going to a Horn & Hardart with my mother as a kid.  There is a reasonable facsimile of one in the film Dark City below. 

Screenshot%2B%25282711%2529.png

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7 hours ago, Mike1951 said:

Having seen them in movies, but never in real life, I always assumed they were only in big cities like New York.

Horn & Hardart's were in  Philadelphia and New York.

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12 hours ago, Mike1951 said:

Having seen them in movies, but never in real life, I always assumed they were only in big cities like New York.

Yeah, I don't recall anything like that in Detroit.  Seeing them in movies I always thought they were kinda cool.

Sepiatone

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5 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Yeah, I don't recall anything like that in Detroit.  Seeing them in movies I always thought they were kinda cool.

Sepiatone

My fellow TCM Nation Associates, Sepiatone and Cigar Joe, just opened up a flood of memories for me by mentioning the name Horn and Hardart.  When I was living in Philadelphia in the late 80s I use to walk by the Horn and Hardart Automat on Chestnut Street I believe was the location.  My parents use to take me to an Automat in the Chicago-land area in the 60s.  That was a treat.  I don't remember if the food was any good but the experience sure was.  It was remarkable you could see through the compartment and see the people preparing the meals.  When a person would take a plate out of the compartment it would be less then a minute that another plate would appear in the same compartment.  

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Last Automat Closes, Its Era Long Gone

  • April 11, 1991

The last Automat in the country, in midtown Manhattan, closed on Tuesday, a victim of changing eating habits.

"That's dreadful," said Henry J. Stern, the former Parks Commissioner who now heads the Citizens Union. "It was equivalent to the Woolworth Building and Macy's windows as the most public place in town. It was everything."

"This is what my mother told me," Mr. Stern said. "One day in the Depression, a man came to the Automat and wanted to commit suicide. So he found a roll -- his last nickel for a roll -- and spread it with J-O Paste, which is rat poison. But at the last minute he lost his nerve and walked out. Someone else came in and saw the roll. It looked like it was buttered. He ate the roll and died. The moral, according to my mother, was, Don't eat from other people's plates."

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Growing up in NY, we loved going to Horn & Hardart. One in Manhattan and one in Yonkers. On an occasional Sunday, my parents and sister and I would go into Manhattan so that my sister and I could go ice skating and then Horn & Hardart's for hot chocolate with whipped cream and sandwiches. Sometimes my mom and I would go shopping at the Cross County Shopping Mall ( and the now defunct John Wanamakers) and then stop at the Horn & Hardart. Brings back some of the best memories of my childhood. I always get a kick when TCM shows That Touch of Mink and Doris has lunch at Horn & Hardart. So many of the restaurants and stores are gone now. Schrafft's was another we use to go to, not an Automat but fun to sit at the counter and have ice cream sundaes.

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1 minute ago, lavenderblue19 said:

 Schrafft's was another we use to go to, not an Automat but fun to sit at the counter and have ice cream sundaes.

Did you speak French to the counterman?

 

 

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On 1/27/2020 at 4:29 PM, JamesStewartFan95 said:

Odd’s Bodkins (Minced Oath Meaning “God’s Body”)

I Got Pinned (Hugo Peabody and I are Getting to a Serious Point in our Relationship)

And my personal favourite...

Ye Gods (An exclamation of astonishment.)

I remember Lou Costello using the expression "Odds Bodkins" in "The Time Of Their Lives".

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Did you speak French to the counterman?

 

 

No, just plain English spoken here. Besides I'm more the Aunte Mame type rather than Gloria. Any other questions?

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1 hour ago, lavenderblue19 said:

No, just plain English spoken here. Besides I'm more the Aunte Mame type rather than Gloria. Any other questions?

As much as I love Gloria (he stepped on the ping pong ball! Can you imagine?!), I also agree that you're more an Auntie Mame.  I enjoyed your story about growing up in NYC.  I would have loved to have visited an Automat.  Lucy and Ethel talk about going  to Schraff's in an episode or two of I Love Lucy

If I were on Auntie Mame, I'd probably be Agnes Gooch, minus the pregnancy. Lol.

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19 hours ago, Mike1951 said:

Having seen them in movies, but never in real life, I always assumed they were only in big cities like New York.

The only one I've ever seen was a beautifully preserved display in The New York State Museum.

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