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Archaic Expressions in Films

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An Automat, I imagine would be like being inside of a giant vending machine. Roy Cronin's article states that the last automat closed in NYC in 1991.  Unfortunately, I only had a 7 year shot to make it to one.  Lol.  Apparently 2006 was the last time you could have sent a paper telegram with Western Union.  I had a much better chance at receiving one of those, but never did :( If I'd known that telegrams were going to close up shop in 2006, I would have sent myself one. 

HI SPEEDRACER5, STOP

I AM SENDING YOU A TELEGRAM STOP

HAVE A GOOD DAY STOP

 

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7 hours ago, Roy Cronin said:

Last Automat Closes, Its Era Long Gone

  • April 11, 1991

The last Automat in the country, in midtown Manhattan, closed on Tuesday, a victim of changing eating habits.

"That's dreadful," said Henry J. Stern, the former Parks Commissioner who now heads the Citizens Union. "It was equivalent to the Woolworth Building and Macy's windows as the most public place in town. It was everything."

"This is what my mother told me," Mr. Stern said. "One day in the Depression, a man came to the Automat and wanted to commit suicide. So he found a roll -- his last nickel for a roll -- and spread it with J-O Paste, which is rat poison. But at the last minute he lost his nerve and walked out. Someone else came in and saw the roll. It looked like it was buttered. He ate the roll and died. The moral, according to my mother, was, Don't eat from other people's plates."

There is actually a Cornell Woolrich mystery story along similar lines called "Death at the Automat."

Woolrich BTW was quite prolific and many of his novels were turned into films (see below)

Convicted (1938) (story Face Work)
Street of Chance (1942) (novel The Black Curtain)
The Leopard Man (1943) (novel Black Alibi), directed by Jacques Tourneur
Phantom Lady (1944) (novel), directed by Robert Siodmak
The Mark of the Whistler (1944) (story Dormant Account), directed by William Castle
Deadline at Dawn (1946) (novel)
Black Angel (1946) (novel)
The Chase (1946) (novel The Black Path of Fear)
Fall Guy (1947) (story Cocaine)
The Guilty (1947) (story He Looked Like Murder)
Fear in the Night (1947) (story Nightmare)
The Return of the Whistler (1948) (story All at Once, No Alice)
I Wouldn't Be in Your Shoes (1948) (story)
Night Has a Thousand Eyes (1948) (novel), directed by John Farrow
The Window (1949) (story The Boy Cried Murder), directed by Ted Tetzlaff
No Man of Her Own (1950) (novel I Married a Dead Man), directed by Mitchell Leisen
The Earring (1951) (story The Death Stone), directed by León Klimovsky
The Trace of Some Lips (1952) (story Collared), directed by Juan Bustillo Oro
If I Should Die Before I Wake (1952), directed by Carlos Hugo Christensen
Don't Ever Open That Door (1952) (stories Somebody on the Phone and Humming Bird Comes Home) directed by Carlos Hugo Christensen
Rear Window (1954) (story It Had to Be Murder), directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Obsession (1954) (story Silent as the Grave), directed by Jean Delannoy
The Glass Eye (1956), directed by Antonio Santillán
Nightmare (1956) (story), directed by Maxwell Shane
Escapade (1957) (story Cinderella and the Mob), directed by Ralph Habib
The Boy Cried Murder (1966) (story The Boy Cried Murder), directed by George P. Breakston
The Bride Wore Black (1968) (novel), directed by François Truffaut
Mississippi Mermaid (1969) (novel Waltz into Darkness), directed by François Truffaut
Kati Patang (1970) (novel I Married a Dead Man)[10]
Seven Blood-Stained Orchids (1972) (novel Rendezvous in Black), directed by Umberto Lenzi
Martha (1974) (story For the Rest of Her Life), directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Gun Moll (1975) (story Collared), directed by Giorgio Capitani
Union City (1980) (story The Corpse Next Door), directed by Marcus Reichert
I Married a Shadow (1983) (novel I Married a Dead Man)
Cloak & Dagger (1984) (story The Boy Who Cried Murder), directed by Richard Franklin
I'm Dangerous Tonight (1990) (story I'm Dangerous Tonight), directed by Tobe Hooper
Mrs. Winterbourne (1996) (novel I Married a Dead Man), directed by Richard Benjamin
Rear Window (1998) (story It Had to Be Murder), directed by Jeff Bleckner
Original Sin (2001) (novel Waltz into Darkness), directed by Michael Cristofer
Four O'Clock (2006) (story Three O'Clock)

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Heard this one today heard it before but got reminded of it again

I got a yen for you.

The yen in this expression comes from the Chinese yan, meaning “a craving” (probably for opium). The term was first recorded in English in 1906.

 

 

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The term "gay" as in The Gay Divorcee had a different meaning then.  Also, stoned often referred to drinking, and what did Cole Porter mean when he said he got no kick from champagne?  Sometimes I think there were veiled references to snorting coke.

Also, the terms for African Americans or blacks has evolved.  Some of Gone with the Wind is cringeworthy for the terminology used.

I remember watching Mean Streets and wondering what a Mook was.

I'm surprised also at how much Yiddish made its way into the movies.

Do many young people know which quotes come from which movies (e.g., there is no place like home and pay no attention to the man behind the curtain)?  

As for automats, I remember H&H on 42nd street in New York.

 

 

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18 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

The term "gay" as in The Gay Divorcee had a different meaning then.  Also, stoned often referred to drinking, and what did Cole Porter mean when he said he got no kick from champagne?  Sometimes I think there were veiled references to snorting coke.

 

 

 

Here is a version of I Get A Kick Out of You that doesn't make a veiled reference to snorting coke.     (starts at 1:20).

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

The term "gay" as in The Gay Divorcee had a different meaning then.  Also, stoned often referred to drinking, and what did Cole Porter mean when he said he got no kick from champagne?  Sometimes I think there were veiled references to snorting coke.

Also, the terms for African Americans or blacks has evolved.  Some of Gone with the Wind is cringeworthy for the terminology used.

I remember watching Mean Streets and wondering what a Mook was.

I'm surprised also at how much Yiddish made its way into the movies.

Do many young people know which quotes come from which movies (e.g., there is no place like home and pay no attention to the man behind the curtain)?  

As for automats, I remember H&H on 42nd street in New York.

 

 

Hold on a second here, chaya!

So, you say you remember a particular automat on 42nd Street, and YET you never heard the the word "mook" used before you watched that Scorsese flick?

(...what, like you spent all those years in the Big Apple never venturing south of 42nd or anywhere near Little Italy or somethin'???)  ;)

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In the 1968 movie HOUSE OF CARDS, George Peppard calls people 'dad' even though they aren't his Dad. 

Fresh! 

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18 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Sometimes I think there were veiled references to snorting coke.

Some get a kick from cocaine
I'm sure that if
I took even one sniff
That would bore me terrif-
Ically, too
Yet, I get a kick out of you

This verse was altered for the 1936 movie, but the original lyrics referenced cocaine explicity.

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The original lyrics back in place for Blazing Saddles. A friend I grew up with couldn't get over the way he swayed and really exaggerated the second syllable of "cocaine". I think it was maybe his favorite moment in move history.

 

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To Dargo:

Of course, I ventured into Chinatown and Little Italy (plus the Lower East Side) many times.  You could walk through all three areas.  I also lived in Queens, the great melting pot.  Sad to say that I never heard the term mook.  Never even heard the terms that Jews are called (my father personally experienced them).  I worked around 42nd street (east side) and remember walking through 42 street when it was not so nice with my Dad.  We were father and daughter (he came to NYC on business - though born there) - get your mind out of the gutter you filthy individuals who accosted us (usually ran triple X rated films or strip joints).

One other thing I only learned later.  How the term "rabbi" is used in police precincts.

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10 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

In the 1968 movie HOUSE OF CARDS, George Peppard calls people 'dad' even though they aren't his Dad. 

I watched Bedtime Story, the inspiration for Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, last year on YouTube, and as I recall, Brando referred to David Niven as "Dad" early on in the movie. Also, in Dr. Zhivago, when the older soldier asks if Lenin will be the new tsar, a younger soldier tells him, "Listen, Daddy, there are no more tsars!" I think it was just a flippant way for younger people to address their elders for a while. Sort of the '60s equivalent of "OK boomer."

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3 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I watched Bedtime Story, the inspiration for Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, last year on YouTube, and as I recall, Brando referred to David Niven as "Dad" early on in the movie. Also, in Dr. Zhivago, when the older soldier asks if Lenin will be the new tsar, a younger soldier tells him, "Listen, Daddy, there are no more tsars!" I think it was just a flippant way for younger people to address their elders for a while. Sort of the '60s equivalent of "OK boomer."

I could be wrong, but I also seem to recall Bob Hope calling Bing Cosby "Dad" or maybe it was "Pops" in one or maybe more of the road pictures, and even though they were pretty much the same age.

(...perhaps our resident road picture expert Tom could conform this for us)

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4 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

To Dargo:

Of course, I ventured into Chinatown and Little Italy (plus the Lower East Side) many times.  You could walk through all three areas.  I also lived in Queens, the great melting pot.  Sad to say that I never heard the term mook.  Never even heard the terms that Jews are called (my father personally experienced them).  I worked around 42nd street (east side) and remember walking through 42 street when it was not so nice with my Dad.  We were father and daughter (he came to NYC on business - though born there) - get your mind out of the gutter you filthy individuals who accosted us (usually ran triple X rated films or strip joints).

One other thing I only learned later.  How the term "rabbi" is used in police precincts.

This reminds me of the first time I ever heard the word "mensch" being said anywhere, and it happened when I was in my early twenties and during my initial viewing on TV of what would become my second favorite movie of all time, The Apartment.

(...you probably remember actor Jack Kruschen who played Jack Lemmon's next door neighbor Dr. Dreyfess telling Lemmon's C.C. Baxter he should try being one)

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Dargo:  Two things you wrote come to mind.  There is no female equivalent to mensch (The Apartment is a great movie and -  being a huge tennis fan - love the scene where Jack Lemmon drains the pasta using a tennis racket. I remember the doctor (plus Fred McMurray as a real cad or "****" - the English translation of that is worse than cad).

As far as the term "dad" and Bedtime Story:  I remember watching that movie years ago and I wonder how the two male leads got along.  I've seen Dirty Rotten Scoundrels recently on another channel I subscribe to (sad that the female lead - G. H. - died so young).  I would like to view Bedtime Story again; however, like many movies, it is Gone With The Wind (which is run far too often).  That brings me to the derogatory term "boy," which was used for blacks.  Also, while it isn't a phrase, the assumption that all blacks are uneducated and cannot speak proper English.

As for Jewish terminology for non-Jews generically.  Please never refer to a shegetz (male) or shiksa (female).  A former Rabbi of mine told me that.  The term translates to abomination.  If you do not know the person's religion, goy is the preferred term or non-Jew.

 

 

 

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21 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

To Dargo:

Of course, I ventured into Chinatown and Little Italy (plus the Lower East Side) many times.  You could walk through all three areas.  I also lived in Queens, the great melting pot.  Sad to say that I never heard the term mook.  Never even heard the terms that Jews are called (my father personally experienced them).  I worked around 42nd street (east side) and remember walking through 42 street when it was not so nice with my Dad.  We were father and daughter (he came to NYC on business - though born there) - get your mind out of the gutter you filthy individuals who accosted us (usually ran triple X rated films or strip joints).

One other thing I only learned later.  How the term "rabbi" is used in police precincts.

I grew up in Queens, went to a junior high-high school in Manhattan. It was an open campus. If you had  classes from say 8  to 10. and then one at 3 PM you could leave the building  walk over to Times Square and see what was there to see or go to the Playland Arcade and play some games. Or jump on a subway down to Chinatown for lunch.  Spent a lot of time around the 42nd St Times Square Area also. One of my friends father owned King Displays a company that did a lot of the Broadway signage, another owned Kaufman's Surplus, both places still in business BTW. Another friends father ran The Brass Rail restaurant that place is long gone though.

I'm part Italian decent , as far as "mook" goes, I too, never heard any of my relatives use it. My father was born in the Apsertides he was a mix of Italian and Croatian. I think mook is a second - third generational bastardization of "mamaluko" which  referred to Egyptian Mamluks who were not very good soldiers being quite easily defeated when Napoleon conquered Egypt,  and sort of got a reputation of being dumb and ineffectual. 

 

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This word hasn't dropped out of the language entirely, but it was already so out of of use even in my childhood, I had no context or point of reference for it. Yet I would see it in older movies containing some sort of swami or Eastern character purporting to have mystic powers. I always thought they were saying "faker", like the cynical Caucasian characters would think the swami was a fake.

fakir

[ fuh-keer, fey-ker ]SHOW IPA

noun

a Muslim or Hindu religious ascetic or mendicant monk commonly considered a wonder-worker.
a member of any Islamic religious order; dervish.
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OK....  first-----

I hear the term "mook" a lot in reruns of LAW AND ORDER, usually in reference( and by Lenny Briscoe)  to mob "wiseguys" who aren't really all that wise. ;) 

And WOOF-WOOF.......  (and second)

Being a tennis fan, you gotta know that racket Lemmon uses to strain the spaghetti pasta is no good anymore after pouring boiling water and boiling hot noodles through and on it.   Try it with YOUR racket and get back to me.  ;)  

As for "dad" and "pops"......

Late '50's and early '60's pseudo hip jargon( like all the other popular culture things Hollywood tries and often gets wrong) was customarily peppered with "beat generation" dudes either calling older "squares" either "dad" or "daddy-o".  and guys have always called older men "pops" for several generations.  Thing is now.....

Calling one's own Father "pops", as when referring to him  ie:  "My pops is bugging me..."  seems, for some odd reason, to be widespread.  I never understood this pluralization thing.  Like "Moms" (for only one Mother) and "Pops"( for only one guy) and even the equally dumb(IMHO) sounding "HELLS YEAH!"  

Now, yeah....   there were times I called my Dad "pops", but then I always, to others, called him "my Dad".  Get my drift?

Sepiatone

 

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12 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

 ...I never understood this pluralization thing.  Like "Moms" (for only one Mother) ...

 

Sure did work for this lady anyway...

moms1.jpg

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I called my Dad "Dad" for most of his life (died ten years ago).  My mother, I call "Mom" or (Ema - long e - means mother in Hebrew).  I never referred to my Dad by his first name - Walter.  And, I have a Hebrew name while my parents were given Yiddish names for many reasons, one of which the State of Israel (and Sephardic Hebrew) weren't established yet.

To Sepiatone (love the name) - I don't play tennis; I watch it (huge fan of Arthur Ashe and Roger Federer - he does Barilla pasta commercials - so maybe he can do it with his old rackets - although Lemmon probably used a wooden racket.  There was an interesting article in yesterday's times about John McEnroe appearing in Mindy K's new show.  He is afraid that he will become an archaic saying - i.e., people will forget who he is.

 

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I grew up in Queens, went to a junior high-high school in Manhattan. It was an open campus. If you had  classes from say 8  to 10. and then one at 3 PM you could leave the building  walk over to Times Square and see what was there to see or go to the Playland Arcade and play some games. Or jump on a subway down to Chinatown for lunch.  Spent a lot of time around the 42nd St Times Square Area also. One of my friends father owned King Displays a company that did a lot of the Broadway signage, another owned Kaufman's Surplus, both places still in business BTW. Another friends father ran The Brass Rail restaurant that place is long gone though.

I'm part Italian decent , as far as "mook" goes, I too, never heard any of my relatives use it. My father was born in the Apsertides he was a mix of Italian and Croatian. I think mook is a second - third generational bastardization of "mamaluko" which  referred to Egyptian Mamluks who were not very good soldiers being quite easily defeated when Napoleon conquered Egypt,  and sort of got a reputation of being dumb and ineffectual. 

 

Chaya and CJ, I grew up in the Bronx and lived in Queens later on and worked in Manhattan.  My neighborhood was a mix of Jewish, Italian and Irish. people. I never heard the expression "mook"  either before hearing it in movies and tv  but  I can think of some other not so flattering Italian expressions LOL.  Good explanation for mook, cigarjoe.

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

So, DARG---- Did you refer to your Mother as, "My "Moms"?  :D 

Sepiatone

Nope, just "Mom", but speaking of "plural" mothers...

 After I'd meet my Canadian birth mother a few years after my Mom died in 2001, I called her "Ma".

I told her when we first met that I felt our biological kinship called for me to call her something more than just "Elizabeth" or "Liz", but I didn't feel right calling her "Mom" because I already had had a mother who I had dearly loved who I called "Mom", and so then thinking this over I asked her how she felt about me calling her "Ma" instead.

The dear lady replied with a tear in her eye, "That would be lovely", and so "Ma" it was.

(...until she too passed away about a year and a half ago now)

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4 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

This word hasn't dropped out of the language entirely, but it was already so out of of use even in my childhood, I had no context or point of reference for it. Yet I would see it in older movies containing some sort of swami or Eastern character purporting to have mystic powers. I always thought they were saying "faker", like the cynical Caucasian characters would think the swami was a fake.

fakir

[ fuh-keer, fey-ker ]SHOW IPA

noun

a Muslim or Hindu religious ascetic or mendicant monk commonly considered a wonder-worker.
a member of any Islamic religious order; dervish.

Btw, and speaking of this AND the idea of one's maternal parent...

I would suppose in order to steer clear of any possible misunderstandings and hurt feelings it could conceivably cause others, it might be best to never precede the above word with the word "mother", and especially so if the above word was to be pronounced as the first phonetic example shown above.

(...hey, jus' sayin', and you have now been warned)

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I say:  → Any 'mystic' who rips me off while I'm trying to contact my dead, deceased stepuncle's cousin's sister's father's aunt's brother's son on his nephew's side is a MutherFakir. 

SO THERE.  :)

 

 

 

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I really don't think that word was used often enough and in enough movies to be considered an "archaic" film expression.  ;) 

And DARG-----

Having never met my "biodad", I'd feel remiss in calling him anything else but "Walt".  But our circumstances were no doubt different.------

My Mother and he were divorced before I was born, and he shortly too, before my birth, moved to California(Hanford I believe) and I recall only talking to him once on the phone.  My older brother went to live with him for a few years in the early '60's.  And he tells me I didn't really miss out on much. But I was still sort of close to his side of the family, and to my Grandfather(HIS dad) and his siblings were disappointed but not surprised they couldn't find him when that Grandfather died in '81 so they could inform him of it.  

I assume he's long gone( he'd be 96 if still alive) and nobody can say where or when his passing might have taken place.

Sepiatone

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