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Archaic Expressions in Films


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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

I really don't think that word was used often enough and in enough movies to be considered an "archaic" film expression. 

I have zero idea what amount of use then  has to do with being archaic.

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I take it all to mean a request for expressions that were of common use in "classic" film that were also once known to have common use in the culture of the times that are now(decades later) considered "archaic".  And, as "FAKIR" wasn't either commonly used in "classic" movies or in the popular culture of the vernacular of the "classic" film periods of the '30's and '40's (and beyond) I wondered at the need of mentioning it in this thread.  For all we know, it might still have common usage somewhere.

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Having never met my "biodad",

 

I apologize that this is so very far off-topic for the thread but I wonder if any person can tell me if there is an equivalent to: "biodad" to denote the man who was a father in all sense except biology. 

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

I apologize that this is so very far off-topic for the thread but I wonder if any person can tell me if there is an equivalent to: "biodad" to denote the man who was a father in all sense except biology. 

"The man who was a father in all sense except biology" you ask, Sans?

Well, all I can tell ya here is that in my case and when I was little, I just called him "Dad", and then somewhere around my teen years I started calling him "Pop".

(...but other than those, I can't think of any other here)

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Btw, I've just now remembered why I started calling him "Pop".

It was because when our family sat around that old Philco TV set in the living room and watched the The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, smart-alecky little Ricky Nelson always called HIS father "Pop", and I guess I thought that that was kind'a cool.

(...and being the impressionable little smart-aleck that I WAS back then, of course)  ;)

 

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I've been reading Henry Roth's Call It Sleep and one of the characters refers to his mother (who was probably young) as his old lady.  I've also heard husbands use that term for a wife.  On the subject of "pop," many Buffalonians use the term "pop" rather than "soda."  Many people have no idea what a selzer (sp?) bottle is.

 

Is there another topic re: quotes that people use from films that younger people (and others) fail to understand (i.e., they have never seen the film or why someone is saying it)?  For example, Strother Martin's comment to Paul Newman in Cool Hand Luke about a failure to communicate.  Too many things from The Godfather (I and II).  Even with terminology, the term Don not being a person's name.  I've sometimes asked people if they are looking at me as if I were Robert De Niro in Taxi Driver.

 

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

"The man who was a father in all sense except biology" you ask, Sans?

Well, all I can tell ya here is that in my case and when I was little, I just called him "Dad", and then somewhere around my teen years I started calling him "Pop".

(...but other than those, I can't think of any other here)

I am sorry to say that my life was not that simple. My mother divorced while I was on the way and remarried prior to my arrival. Both men were very much part of my life. What I called either one at any given moment depended on how strict he was being, which other people were present and how much I wanted something.

For the sake of the thread: the phrases: "a bun in the oven" and "in a family way" are not as popular as they were at one time.

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20 hours ago, SansFin said:

I apologize that this is so very far off-topic for the thread but I wonder if any person can tell me if there is an equivalent to: "biodad" to denote the man who was a father in all sense except biology. 

Sure.  The man I called "Dad"----my stepfather.  ;)  As I was just a couple of months away from turning 8 years old when Mom married him,  and he was the only "Father figure" I was familiar with, I started calling him "Dad" right off. 

16 hours ago, SansFin said:

 

For the sake of the thread: the phrases: "a bun in the oven" and "in a family way" are not as popular as they were at one time.

"In a(or "the") family way"  would be archaic.  "a bun in the oven"  is so crass it never deserved to be dignified with acknowledgement or consideration.

Sepiatone

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19 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Sure.  The man I called "Dad"----my stepfather.  ;)  As I was just a couple of months away from turning 8 years old when Mom married him,  and he was the only "Father figure" I was familiar with, I started calling him "Dad" right off. 

"In a(or "the") family way"  would be archaic.  "a bun in the oven"  is so crass it never deserved to be dignified with acknowledgement or consideration.

Sepiatone

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"Crass"?! So whaddaya mean by THAT here, buddy???"

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5 minutes ago, SansFin said:

IX3hsLL.jpg

LOL

"Dill Dough"! I love it!!!

(...the play-on-words, that is)

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

Sure.  The man I called "Dad"----my stepfather.  ;)  As I was just a couple of months away from turning 8 years old when Mom married him,  and he was the only "Father figure" I was familiar with, I started calling him "Dad" right off. 

"In a(or "the") family way"  would be archaic.  "a bun in the oven"  is so crass it never deserved to be dignified with acknowledgement or consideration.

Sepiatone

I am a little ashamed to say that your mention of: stepfather reminded me of the first time I saw on television a comedian who was among tools and reached out and stated: "This is my stepladder. I never knew my real ladder."

A fairly recent episode of: NCIS had Dr. Palmer's wife send him a pictographic message which deciphered as: "a bun in the oven" to announce her condition. I recall it well as that is the first time I had heard the phrase in many years.

I was reduced at times to saying: "my father" or "my other father" but I would mix which was which that I meant depending on context. It would be nice to have 'biodad' and a nonbiological equivalent when speaking of them.

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5 minutes ago, Dargo said:

LOL

"Dill Dough"! I love it!!!

(...the play-on-words, that is)

Oh my!

I did not notice that! I googled "Pillsbury Doughboy Obituary" and the results were all text as I remembered it. They mention John and Jane only. I finally reached that image and so I copied it but did not read it. 

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That comedian could have been TIM ALLEN, who coincidentally(for here) back in his earlier stand-up days in the Detroit area, did a gag about how he hated the Pillsbury dough boy, and had a desire to..."BAKE the little sucker."  Going on (and politically incorrectly  ;) )  "He'd bake to a crisp, dark golden brown, pop out of the oven carrying a little boombox on his shoulder.  THEN he'd be known as..

THE PILLSBURY SOULBOY!"   :D

Tim was much funnier before his "men are pigs" routines and animal grunts.

Sepiatone

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My grandfather passed away several years before I was born.  My grandmother remarried 2 years before I was born to a widower she had known since her college days (all 4 of them were friends in college).  I guess that's your step-grandfather, but we just called him by his first name, which seemed a bit odd to me growing up.  His family also called my grandmother by her first name.

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50 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

NOTE:  I am sorry to report Dill Dough died of an overdoughs.  So Sad.  :o

Then shouldn't you also post this in that "Death Takes No Holiday" thread, Mr.G???

(...I would, but then again maybe that's just me)

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A swell - In the 1930s, swell became a popular slang term meaning great or excellent. But it also can describe a wealthy, elegant person, like a group of swells at a fancy restaurant.

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So, when they said, "You can tell it's Mattel...IT'S SWELL!"  did it mean it was good, or wealthy and elegant?  And what would that slogan have been if the company manufactured SEX TOYS......

"You can tell it's Mattel....IT SWELLS!"?    :o

Sepiatone

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9 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

So, when they said, "You can tell it's Mattel...IT'S SWELL!"  did it mean it was good, or wealthy and elegant?  And what would that slogan have been if the company manufactured SEX TOYS......

"You can tell it's Mattel....IT SWELLS!"?    :o

Sepiatone

So, are we back on that whole "Dill Dough" thing again here???

;)

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

A swell - In the 1930s, swell became a popular slang term meaning great or excellent. But it also can describe a wealthy, elegant person, like a group of swells at a fancy restaurant.

Then there's this Rodgers & Hart song from 1927, mixing really archaic language with then-current slang:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thou_Swell  

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1 minute ago, txfilmfan said:

Then there's this Rodgers & Hart song from 1927, mixing really archaic language with then-current slang:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thou_Swell  

And if you're not familiar with the song directly, if you've ever seen All About Eve, specifically, the "fasten your seat belts ..." scene, then you've heard the song.  It's playing in the background during that famous line.

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A  Shamus (Bogart's pronunciation ) or Shaymus (Lloyd Nolan's pronunciation) depending on which film you watch is a slang term for detective. Bogart was NYC born and Nolan was San Francisco. 

 

I've read that it could be derived from a Yiddish word shames shammes a word  for a sexton of a synagogue who is in the know as to what is going on in the community. 

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"Gumshoe" was another old name for private detectives, due mostly to the gummed soled shoes they were believed to have worn so as to not be detected while shadowing somebody.  And then there's------  ;)

Sepiatone

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I watched GREASE a few weeks ago and there's a scene at the drive-in where the gossip chain is going about Rizzo having a bun in the over.  I think that's more polite than saying 'knocked up' -- which I believe was the title of a movie I haven't seen. 

I remember watching THE CAREY TREATMENT (1972) and an unexpectedly pregnant girl was sometimes noted to be "in trouble". 

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