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cigarjoe

Archaic Expressions in Films

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I just heard, "If you want customer service, DIAL two". 

While I still have dial phones in service, I don't think the rotary dial works with new technology. Have you ever seen a kid try to use a dial phone? I've had kids CALL my phone from within the house just to prove to them that's what that black heavy metal thing on the desk really is.

51Yap3PjgVL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg

And the rotary says GR-97681. The GR stands for "granite" although there's no granite here. I think they just chose some random word. You can always tell a longtime Eastwood resident if their phone number starts with "479"

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I just heard, "If you want customer service, DIAL two". 

While I still have dial phones in service, I don't think the rotary dial works with new technology. Have you ever seen a kid try to use a dial phone? I've had kids CALL my phone from within the house just to prove to them that's what that black heavy metal thing on the desk really is.

51Yap3PjgVL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg

And the rotary says GR-97681. The GR stands for "granite" although there's no granite here. I think they just chose some random word. You can always tell a longtime Eastwood resident if their phone number starts with "479"

I recently had a college kid in my residence.  I think you can call her a millennial.  I had a vinyl record album, more specifically, a vinyl picture disc album on my desk.  She thought it was a Frisbee and started handling it like a Frisbee.  I quickly took it away from her fearing she would break it.   I played the vinyl album for her on a turntable and she was amazed and confused.  This was the first time she had ever seen a vinyl record album played in her life.  

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I just heard, "If you want customer service, DIAL two". 

While I still have dial phones in service, I don't think the rotary dial works with new technology. Have you ever seen a kid try to use a dial phone? I've had kids CALL my phone from within the house just to prove to them that's what that black heavy metal thing on the desk really is.

51Yap3PjgVL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg

And the rotary says GR-97681. The GR stands for "granite" although there's no granite here. I think they just chose some random word. You can always tell a longtime Eastwood resident if their phone number starts with "479"

I'm thinking the pre-recorded instruction to "dial" two was meant for those who(like many I know) still use the term "dial" when referring to the use of their push-button or digital cell phones.  And remember....   That accidental call you got from someone else's cell phone was referred to as(and still is) "BUTT DIALING

I remember those old phone number prefixes.  The two predominant ones in my area were "WARWICK"( 9-2)  and "DUNKIRK"(3-8)  But when relating a number(yours or what) people would usually just SAY the first two letters.  ie: "Double-U -A  80688" or.... "Dee-You 60699".  ;)  That little strip in the middle of the dial would have the first two letters of that prefix in larger print, like--- DUnkirk 6-0699.  What also makes me feel old is that both my kids grew up with dial phones and record players and went through the evolution of "cordless" -to-cell and vinyl-to-CD  with their parents.  And too, recall the "pre-VCR days"  and the advent of DVDs. Of course though, they have friends with kids in THEIR 20's who are unfamiliar with ANY of that. :( 

AND there are a few "tweens" and a bit older punks in my family who, when over to my house, are astonished that it's possible to listen to music WITHOUT earbuds and through something that sounds so LIFELIKE!   As a home stereo unit.  Ha!  The biggest "speaker" in THEIR homes is the AMAZON ECHO coaster looking like device on a side table that sounds as good(IMO) as ANY '50's pocket transistor radio. :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

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13 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I just heard, "If you want customer service, DIAL two". 

While I still have dial phones in service, I don't think the rotary dial works with new technology. Have you ever seen a kid try to use a dial phone? I've had kids CALL my phone from within the house just to prove to them that's what that black heavy metal thing on the desk really is.

51Yap3PjgVL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg

And the rotary says GR-97681. The GR stands for "granite" although there's no granite here. I think they just chose some random word. You can always tell a longtime Eastwood resident if their phone number starts with "479"

Exchange names often had no real connection to a local area, especially after AT&T issued a list of standardized exchange names to use as they converted their entire network to 2L-5N telephone numbers in the 1940s and 1950s (in preparation for direct-dialed long distance calls using area codes, they were standardizing local numbers across the network to 7 digits in length).   AT&T chose names that were easily understood when spoken by a variety of accents (operators still placed a lot of calls during this time period), and were unlikely to be misspelled.  

Exchange names started to be phased out in the late 1950s, and the greatest resistance to conversion was in the largest cities (New York, San Francisco, Philadelphia), where there were significant connections between the exchange names and local neighborhoods.  There's an All in the Family episode from the mid-1970s where Edith is dialing a number, reciting it with an exchange name, and then saying something like "Oh no!  It's all numbers now...", and then she dials it, has a puzzled look on her face, and realizes it's the same number whether you use letters or numbers.

I'm old enough to remember our beige desk phone having our exchange (letters only, no name) CA on it, but by the time I was old enough to use the phone in the late 60s, we had long switched over to all number dialing and phone directories.  Our neighbors' Dad worked for Southwestern Bell, and they had those newfangled TouchTone phones installed in 1967 or 1968.  We didn't switch until around 1974, when my Dad's office modernized their phone system and they upgraded to TouchTone phones with number storage units and something called speed-dial!

Our house also had something that went out sometime in the 50s I guess: A telephone nook built into the wall.  Ours was in the most inconvenient place: the hall.  My grandmother's house had one in the same place.  We never used it for the phone.  My Dad kept his keys there forever, until they remodeled the house and the caddy was covered up with fresh sheetrock.

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8 hours ago, thomasterryjr said:

I recently had a college kid in my residence.  I think you can call her a millennial.  I had a vinyl record album, more specifically, a vinyl picture disc album on my desk.  She thought it was a Frisbee and started handling it like a Frisbee.  I quickly took it away from her fearing she would break it.   I played the vinyl album for her on a turntable and she was amazed and confused.  This was the first time she had ever seen a vinyl record album played in her life.  

That's a pretty extraordinary story, especially since I keep reading vinyl sales have surpassed CDs in the past year or two. But I guess it's not college students buying vinyl records. I assume she knows what a CD is.

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10 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

That's a pretty extraordinary story, especially since I keep reading vinyl sales have surpassed CDs in the past year or two. But I guess it's not college students buying vinyl records. I assume she knows what a CD is.

 I did not ask college student at the time but I think she was confused by seeing a picture image on vinyl and that's why she thought it was a Frisbee or plastic toy.  The picture disc was "The Beatles' Abbey Road" by the way.  Millennials download their music, see a thumbnail image of the artist on their phones and hear their music on their earbuds.  They may not know how it feels to hold a brand new vinyl album, read the album notes,  go to a listening party to hear and experience the album with their friends as the album rotates on the turntable, the entire room filled with music from two speakers.  Afterwards, there is a discussion on what was just heard and how the music made you feel, favorite cuts on the album, etc.

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9 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

 

I remember those old phone number prefixes.  The two predominant ones in my area were "WARWICK"( 9-2)  and "DUNKIRK"(3-8)  ....

Sepiatone

 

6 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

...Exchange names often had no real connection to a local area...

Well, I'd say in the case of Sepia's old Detroit area alpha-prefix of "Dunkirk", there might be a bit of a connection here, anyway.

AND, seein' as how after The Motor City's Big Three began laying people off in droves starting back in the 1970s and '80s, there commenced  an "orderly evacuation " from that town afterward!

LOL

(...sorry Sepia, just couldn't resist...but you know my fondness for historical references, don't ya) ;) 

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18 hours ago, thomasterryjr said:

I played the vinyl album for her on a turntable and she was amazed and confused.  This was the first time she had ever seen a vinyl record album played in her life.  

She's never seen YouTube videos of records playing on a turntable? First time I saw one of those it cracked me up.

Picture disks....most are never played. 

14 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Exchange names often had no real connection to a local area, especially after AT&T issued a list of standardized exchange names to use as they converted their entire network (snipped)  AT&T chose names that were easily understood when spoken by a variety of accents 

Wow thanks for that explanation! I never knew any of the backstory on exchange "names".

Several years ago, I took my Mother was to see a Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade & we stayed at the Hotel Pennsylvania. She asked if it was "PEnnsylvania 65000" & sure enough it IS!

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No worries DARG.  ;) 

I still recall all those old T-shirts, bumper stickers and wall plaques that read:

"Will the last person to leave Michigan please turn off the lights?"   :D 

Between Nov. '79 and March '80  I was laid off, but did get called back to my old plant and department( but on a different job) and remained until the plant closed for good in  Jan. '88.

Sepiatone

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On 6/9/2020 at 3:04 PM, txfilmfan said:

Exchange names often had no real connection to a local area, especially after AT&T issued a list of standardized exchange names to use as they converted their entire network to 2L-5N telephone numbers in the 1940s and 1950s (in preparation for direct-dialed long distance calls using area codes, they were standardizing local numbers across the network to 7 digits in length).   AT&T chose names that were easily understood when spoken by a variety of accents (operators still placed a lot of calls during this time period), and were unlikely to be misspelled.  

Exchange names started to be phased out in the late 1950s, and the greatest resistance to conversion was in the largest cities (New York, San Francisco, Philadelphia), where there were significant connections between the exchange names and local neighborhoods.  There's an All in the Family episode from the mid-1970s where Edith is dialing a number, reciting it with an exchange name, and then saying something like "Oh no!  It's all numbers now...", and then she dials it, has a puzzled look on her face, and realizes it's the same number whether you use letters or numbers.

I'm old enough to remember our beige desk phone having our exchange (letters only, no name) CA on it, but by the time I was old enough to use the phone in the late 60s, we had long switched over to all number dialing and phone directories.  Our neighbors' Dad worked for Southwestern Bell, and they had those newfangled TouchTone phones installed in 1967 or 1968.  We didn't switch until around 1974, when my Dad's office modernized their phone system and they upgraded to TouchTone phones with number storage units and something called speed-dial!

Our house also had something that went out sometime in the 50s I guess: A telephone nook built into the wall.  Ours was in the most inconvenient place: the hall.  My grandmother's house had one in the same place.  We never used it for the phone.  My Dad kept his keys there forever, until they remodeled the house and the caddy was covered up with fresh sheetrock.

I have lived through the rotary to touch-tone days and the speed-dial and automatic redial technology.  One piece of technology, if you want to call it that, has escaped me.  They no longer make this type of telephone but I will try my best to describe it.  Back in the late 60s and early 70s there were telephones which would dial the phone number you wanted automatically.  You had to take the receiver off the hook,  place a small card which had holes strategically placed on them into the telephone and somehow this made the telephone dial the phone number.   I have seen this type of phone on television and movie programs from this era but never had the chance to see this type of telephone in person.

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1 minute ago, thomasterryjr said:

I have lived through the rotary to touch-tone days and the speed-dial and automatic redial technology.  One piece of technology, if you want to call it that, has escaped me.  They no longer make this type of telephone but I will try my best to describe it.  Back in the late 60s and early 70s there were telephones which would dial the phone number you wanted automatically.  You had to take the receiver off the hook,  place a small card which had holes strategically placed on them into the telephone and somehow this made the telephone dial the phone number.   I have seen this type of phone on television and movie programs from this era but never had the chance to see this type of telephone in person.

Here's a variety of them...

http://www.paul-f.com/weCardDialers.htm

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I still have a landline because I live in a rather woodsy area and the cell phone service is ♦spotty♦, to say the least.  You really cannot depend upon cell phone service on the side of a mountain (albeit a gently-sloping mountain) with a lot of trees everywhere.  And if the power should go out the phone line generally does not so I can still call out because my landline has a cord.  

 

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4 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I still have a landline because I live in a rather woodsy area and the cell phone service is ♦spotty♦, to say the least.  You really cannot depend upon cell phone service on the side of a mountain (albeit a gently-sloping mountain) with a lot of trees everywhere.  And if the power should go out the phone line generally does not so I can still call out because my landline has a cord.  

 

The AT&T landline network was the most reliable network ever built.

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8 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

The AT&T landline network was the most reliable network ever built.

Agreed. I'm always amazed at what people "settle" for- cel phones are great when there's an emergency, but the sound quality does not compare to a landline, even cordless receivers. Same inferior sound quality today for listening to music.

I keep my old "Gotham" phone plugged in just in case the cordless ones fail. It's funny when someone calls here you hear all the phones chirp while the one old one has a raspy buzz. 

Anyone remember department store pager bells? It wasn't until I was window dresser in a big department store that I realized what that "bink-bong-bink-bong" sound was. Of course mine was the longest: 5/6 meaning five bells followed by six bells. To this day when I hear bells trilling, I count them.

 

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Agreed. I'm always amazed at what people "settle" for- cel phones are great when there's an emergency, but the sound quality does not compare to a landline, even cordless receivers. Same inferior sound quality today for listening to music.

I keep my old "Gotham" phone plugged in just in case the cordless ones fail. It's funny when someone calls here you hear all the phones chirp while the one old one has a raspy buzz. 

Anyone remember department store pager bells? It wasn't until I was window dresser in a big department store that I realized what that "bink-bong-bink-bong" sound was. Of course mine was the longest: 5/6 meaning five bells followed by six bells. To this day when I hear bells trilling, I count them.

 

Some department stores here still use paging chimes.  Dillard's is a regional (though rather large) chain, and while waiting in the gift wrapping department back in December, I heard the chimes there.  Brought a smile to my face.

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21 hours ago, thomasterryjr said:

I have lived through the rotary to touch-tone days and the speed-dial and automatic redial technology.  One piece of technology, if you want to call it that, has escaped me.  They no longer make this type of telephone but I will try my best to describe it.  Back in the late 60s and early 70s there were telephones which would dial the phone number you wanted automatically.  You had to take the receiver off the hook,  place a small card which had holes strategically placed on them into the telephone and somehow this made the telephone dial the phone number.   I have seen this type of phone on television and movie programs from this era but never had the chance to see this type of telephone in person.

I remember those!  Well, one in particular...

My best friend in the '60s had one.  His dad was some management level Western Electric employee.  It was SOOOO cool back then!

19 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I still have a landline because I live in a rather woodsy area and the cell phone service is ♦spotty♦, to say the least.  You really cannot depend upon cell phone service on the side of a mountain (albeit a gently-sloping mountain) with a lot of trees everywhere.  And if the power should go out the phone line generally does not so I can still call out because my landline has a cord.  

 

I still keep one because power outages happen on their own time.  And my cell might be on the charger and shy of a useful charge when the power goes out, or it might be lost or some other issue.  It all reminds me of an old joke(which might not be so much of a joke these days :( ) .....

A man comes home from work looking completely frazzled.  His wife says, "Why dear, you look exhausted.  Have a hard day at work today?"  And the man replied;  "MAN!  It was rough!.  All of our computers broke down and we had to THINK!"  :D 

Sepiatone

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Haha, the fire truck drove by yesterday on the week's check of empty house status and I saw "DIAL 911" on the side of the truck in big gold letters.

Just an aside, I have a book on my shelf from 1994 (when I was an editor/reviewer) called GOING GOING GONE-Vanishing Americana. Each entry has a few pages if text/photos. A few not already discussed here:

  • Balsa wood airplanes
  • Carbon Paper
  • Enclosed Telephone Booths
  • Fur Coats
  • Gas Station Attendants
  • Mending
  • Men's Clubs
  • Nuns
  • Paper Boys
  • Paper Dolls
  • Penmanship
  • Sanitary Napkin Belts (thank god)
  • Smell of burning leaves
  • Stockings
  • Suntans
  • Telegrams
  • The unanswered phone

We are familiar with many of the items in the book just from watching old movies. Actually, B&W Movies is represented in the book!  I use carbon paper to transfer designs and it's very hard finding it in art supply stores.

With the big change in our society, I wonder if "mending" will come back? I wear hand-me-downs & am often amazed the reason my benefactors tossed an item is a MISSING BUTTON!

 

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Haha, the fire truck drove by yesterday on the week's check of empty house status and I saw "DIAL 911" on the side of the truck in big gold letters.

Just an aside, I have a book on my shelf from 1994 (when I was an editor/reviewer) called GOING GOING GONE-Vanishing Americana. Each entry has a few pages if text/photos. A few not already discussed here:

  • Balsa wood airplanes
  • Carbon Paper
  • Enclosed Telephone Booths
  • Fur Coats
  • Gas Station Attendants
  • Mending
  • Men's Clubs
  • Nuns
  • Paper Boys
  • Paper Dolls
  • Penmanship
  • Sanitary Napkin Belts (thank god)
  • Smell of burning leaves
  • Stockings
  • Suntans
  • Telegrams
  • The unanswered phone

We are familiar with many of the items in the book just from watching old movies. Actually, B&W Movies is represented in the book!  I use carbon paper to transfer designs and it's very hard finding it in art supply stores.

With the big change in our society, I wonder if "mending" will come back? I wear hand-me-downs & am often amazed the reason my benefactors tossed an item is a MISSING BUTTON!

 

Nice list, and I get it.  But too, I took the time to "bold" those items I still notice remaining with us. Let's review.....

MENDING.  Yep.  I still mend what I can. THEN discard when it requires mending beyond my ability.

I still see NUNS from time to time, as I often drive by a Catholic parochial school to certain destinations.

And probably less PAPER BOYS these days as the last few persons who delivered my newspapers were adults.  And yes, I still get home delivery in this day of "virtual" newspapers as The Detroit Free Press still home delivers a newspaper, but only on Thursday, Friday and Sunday. I have to go online the remaining days.

THE UNANSWERED PHONE?  Well, since the advent of the days of the cell phone, I probably missed many calls due to my refusal to blithely answer a phone when that phone's ID won't proffer proper identification as to whom is calling.  And usually the calls that don't ID themselves clearly come from cell phones.  I'll usually get something like "Name unavailable" or "Wireless caller" for those, and too, I get a LOT of calls from cities I've never heard of in Michigan, or cities in other states in which I know nobody from there.  I answered them (a few) early on and found myself trying to be talked into buying...

Home security systems,  Automobile warranty policies, Life Alert systems, etc.  Or some charity I never heard of asking for a donation.  So, for several years now I stopped answering calls that aren't properly identified.  And anyone I know and CARE to talk to has their name and number in my "contacts" list so when the call from the number associated to them, their name will show up clearly on the phones caller ID.

Sepiatone

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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 I use carbon paper to transfer designs and it's very hard finding it in art supply stores.

With the big change in our society, I wonder if "mending" will come back? I wear hand-me-downs & am often amazed the reason my benefactors tossed an item is a MISSING BUTTON!

 

You may wish to try this site: https://www.crecrafts.com/collections/carbon-paper/products/bulk-buy-carbon-transfer-tracing-paper-for-woodworking-patterns-15-sheets-26-x-42-per-sheet

I can give no definite recommendation for the company because I never deal with them directly. I belong to a circle where we state what we intend to order so that we may find if any other person wants part of a bulk order or wants us to order multiples of an item to save on shipping and ordering costs. I often take a sheet or two of this when some other person orders it from them. The transfer paper itself is good.

 You did mention that: "Men's Clubs" are archaic. This is a shame because there are so many men who need a good clubbing. 

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49 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

THE UNANSWERED PHONE? 

Honestly I think they're referring to the sound of a phone ringing and ringing without anyone (or machine) answering it.

Has anyone noticed this scenario when watching a movie with an unanswered phone ringing..... silently counting the rings waiting to listen if the caller is going to leave a message? 🙋‍♀️

I just recently watched Stiller & Meara on the Ed Sullivan Show doing a hilarious skit of two people making a blind date. Both of them just installed NEW answering machines & were checking on their messages. It was in B&W I believe, so early 60's? They were in costume, Stiller was a painter in whites. (Please someone find & post it)

I remember the joy of FINALLY using interoffice phones that put people on hold, conference called & had a "double ring" code for in-house calls at my job as window dresser in the early to late 80's. I thought I was SO COOL....I loved working in that big Main St department store, it was a different era for sure, for many reasons. They had their own employee cafeteria! 

 

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13 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Honestly I think they're referring to the sound of a phone ringing and ringing without anyone (or machine) answering it.

Has anyone noticed this scenario when watching a movie with an unanswered phone ringing..... silently counting the rings waiting to listen if the caller is going to leave a message? 🙋‍♀️

I just recently watched Stiller & Meara on the Ed Sullivan Show doing a hilarious skit of two people making a blind date. Both of them just installed NEW answering machines & were checking on their messages. It was in B&W I believe, so early 60's? They were in costume, Stiller was a painter in whites. (Please someone find & post it)

I remember the joy of FINALLY using interoffice phones that put people on hold, conference called & had a "double ring" code for in-house calls at my job as window dresser in the early to late 80's. I thought I was SO COOL....I loved working in that big Main St department store, it was a different era for sure, for many reasons. They had their own employee cafeteria! 

 

 

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I guess that clip points out it was your TV that was black and white!  ;) 

One of my favorite memories of my recently deceased sister in law goes back to the early days of cell phones.  My wife was checking the voicemail log on hers and got this mesage from Anita, who obviously didn't realize the difference from  cell phone voicemail and a telephone answering machine.....

She kept urging my wife to ....

"Pick up, pick up, pick UP!"  :D 

Sepiatone

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Speaking of things that are relics from the past . . . 

American passenger cars with 2-speed automatic transmissions.   

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The following may have been mentioned before in this thread, but...

97539_full.jpg?w=676

And playing the lead "stewardess" onboard Trans Global Airlines Flt. 2 from Chicago to Rome, and who is having an affair with Captain Dino to her right here, is lovely actress Jacqueline Bisset.

This of course being a time before that job description would become known as the gender nonspecific "flight attendant".

AND of course, back in that bygone era when air travel was considered "glamorous".

(...btw, I think Jackie there is the only one still  kickin' around who's in that photo, isn't she)

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