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cigarjoe

Archaic Expressions in Films

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On 3/1/2019 at 8:32 AM, Sepiatone said:

You forgot "TOMATO".  (The Stardust Ballroom has a LOT of them!  ;) )

Sepiatone

I bet you've met some "hot tamales" in your time also, Sepia?

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Yeah, and I have a couple of nieces who are COLLEGE GIRLS!  :o

You know----

"One Step-a from the STREET!"  :wacko:

Sepiatone

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before 'tomato' there was 'doxie' as a slur for a loose or fast woman. late 1800s.

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I'm still thinking this thread was intended to point out those "archaic" phrases heard in movies that refer to things and/or actions that have long been obsolete.  Or too, showing some of those obsolete things.  Like the toilet with the tank high up on the wall requiring a long chain to pull in order to flush it.  Or, maybe somebody saying, "Hitch up the team and let's go to town." --- "Get on the horn and give 'em the lowdown."

Sepiatone

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On 2/19/2019 at 6:27 PM, cigarjoe said:

stick your neck out

Heh, I said in class "I'll go out on a limb here and....." the kids said "Whaaaa?" and I had to explain what it meant. And Barney Google's horse was called Spark Plug. Wonder if that was the origin of the phrase? When my horse misbehaves I say "glue or dog food?"

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Did we do...

"it's your dime start talking" when pay phones were a dime. On the same track...

To drop a dime on someone was to rat them out to the cops or other crooks.

two bits was a quarter, 25 cents, a dime was a short bit fifteen cents was the long bit.

A dime a dance hall girl was a taxi dancer

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I love hearing these expressions immortalized in movies that would otherwise be forgotten.  Two things:

Movie dialog didn't and doesn't necessary mirror real-life language.  If a line is used in a movie, that doesn't mean it came from real life.  It might have been invented, modified, or paraphrased by the screenwriters.  In short, people in the movies don't and didn't always talk like people in real life. 

Another kind of expressions immortalized in movies are those involving contemporary topical subjects.  Some movie dialog may refer to news events that occurred around the time the movie was made.  If the news events are forgotten, then the meaning of the dialog is hard to understand for modern viewers.  This is akin to watching those old SNL skits, many of which lampooned events of the day that are now forgotten.  In A Night at the Opera (1935), when Harpo refers to those "five kids up in Canada," he refers to a set of Canadian quintuplets that were quite famous at the time, but are quite unknown to us today.

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2 hours ago, DVDPhreak said:

....This is akin to watching those old SNL skits, many of which lampooned events of the day that are now forgotten.  In A Night at the Opera (1935), when Harpo refers to those "five kids up in Canada," he refers to a set of Canadian quintuplets that were quite famous at the time, which many people today probably don't know about.

Poor ol' Chico. As it seems few remember him now days either.

(...that was my way of saying that it was of course Chico who says that line in that movie, as I'm sure you remember Harpo never says a word in any of their movies) ;)

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21 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Poor ol' Chico. As it seems few remember him now days either.

(...that was my way of saying that it was of course Chico who says that line in that movie, as I'm sure you remember Harpo never says a word in any of their movies) ;)

LOL, excellent comeback!!  Uh, Targo?  Taco?  Da..r..g, something... 

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9 hours ago, DVDPhreak said:

Movie dialog didn't and doesn't necessary mirror real-life language.  If a line is used in a movie, that doesn't mean it came from real life.  It might have been invented, modified, or paraphrased by the screenwriters.  In short, people in the movies don't and didn't always talk like people in real life. 

Yes this fits genuine Western Gibberish, ya know the stuff they made up instead of real cuss words....

Dad Bust It!

Dad Gum It!

dang blammit!

sidewindin'

bushwackin'

hornswagglin' 

by ginger

Jumpin Jehosephat

 

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53 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Yes this fits genuine Western Gibberish, ya know the stuff they made up instead of real cuss words....

Dad Bust It!

Dad Gum It!

dang blammit!

sidewindin'

bushwackin'

hornswagglin' 

by ginger

Jumpin Jehosephat

 

In this same vein, I now seem to hear a lot of: "Shut the front door!".

(...and which of course is really just a cleaned up version of "Shut the......", well, YOU know) ;)

 

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Quote

Movie dialog didn't and doesn't necessary mirror real-life language.  If a line is used in a movie, that doesn't mean it came from real life.  It might have been invented, modified, or paraphrased by the screenwriters.  In short, people in the movies don't and didn't always talk like people in real life. 

--DVDPhreak

Well said, sirrah. There's a lot of responses one could make to complement or (gently) contradict or add-on to your interesting observations here. There's something in what you say, after all. It's mostly true. But in many ways an opposing interpretation can be argued just as well.

For example. there's an increasing number of fun books on vanished slang which attest that the diversity of forgotten dialect is richer than we can imagine. Americans have a short memory. One such book is 'Dewdroppers, Waldos, and Slackers' by Rosemarie Ostler. But even this kind of lightweight compendium of course, is nothing compared to more weighty tomes like the infamous 'Dictionary of American Slang' (which retails at $250 for guys like you and me!)

Another example are the books by David Maurer like 'The Big Con' or his arcane study of the specialized argot used by pickpocket gangs of the 1930s. These two works of nonfiction--let's generously call them "modern anthropology"--directly inspired the famous 1973 movie, 'The Sting'.

My very mild point here is that even if movie dialogue is often 'invented', there was still very flavorful slang history, which existed in reality, and which wasn't fictitious at all.

 

Quote

Another kind of expressions immortalized in movies are those involving contemporary topical subjects.  Some movie dialog may refer to news events that occurred around the time the movie was made.  If the news events are forgotten, then the meaning of the dialog is hard to understand for modern viewers.

--DVDPhreak

Indeed, this phenomenon even has an industry name. It's the acrid, pungent, "You've Got Mail" blunder and wise writers and directors usually try not to flaunt it. They were aware of the reek of this kind of thing long before the advent of this notoriously short-sighted movie premise, but this remains the definitive instance of 'doing it wrong'.

Naturally, even in the 1950s it was understood that if you wanted your work to be 'timeless' and 'durable' then you wouldn't base it on anything which might quickly become an anachronism. But the mistake continues to be compounded and repeated even unto our own day. It's just the way Hollywood behaves.

Topical humor: I agree with you, up to a point. Some old jokes are inscrutable. Nevertheless, one might say that the political humor of early SNL still functions, since a story about bumbling or incompetent or draconian US Presidents is never not timely, in our nation. Its a recurring circumstance. Context is the handmade of comedy, one might say.

Plenty more aspects to cover here but I'll pause since its late night in my timezone. Oh well. Good stuff...

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More money....

do a dime or do a nickel do ten years or five in prison.

A fin is a five dollar bill, a slat a single dollar, a C note a hundred dollar bill a G or a Grand a thousand dollars

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21 hours ago, DVDPhreak said:

Movie dialog didn't and doesn't necessary mirror real-life language. 

I've found that to be very true concerning "diner lingo". It's mostly legend and I'd guess from movies or DIME novels.

2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

do a dime or do a nickel do ten years or five in prison.

Well in the 70's a "dime" or "nickel" was a unit of measurement to those selling the hippie weed.

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11 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Yes this fits genuine Western Gibberish, ya know the stuff they made up instead of real cuss words....

Dad Bust It!

Dad Gum It!

dang blammit!

sidewindin'

bushwackin'

hornswagglin' 

by ginger

Jumpin Jehosephat

 

You forgot---

"Dad burn it!"

"Gol durn( or dang) it!"

And I think it was actually---

"Dad blast it!"  ;)

Sepiatone

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More...

middlin'

Want it straight or wrapped up in Christmas Paper?

a buzzer (badge)

a drinking spell

a jam

a jasper

lay another plate on the table

played for a sucker

douse the light

 

 

 

 

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39 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Want it straight or wrapped up in Christmas Paper?

OK well now you're just picking out great lines of dialogue in a movie. I don't think that was a commonly used phrase.

My favorite in that category? Don't recall the film, but Betty Hutton says "You've got more nerve than a bad tooth!" (I use that phrase often)

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I was thinking more of the Christmas paper part of the phrase, nobody I know uses that anymore....

There's another odd phrase that uses "school"  in it that I just can't recall, I know Gloria Grahame uses it in one of her Film Noir, and I've heard Burgess Meredith use it in another also.

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When was the last time any of you used, or heard anyone else use the word "juice" to refer to electricity?

I recently used it with a nephew, helping me with setting up the charger for my wife's Rascal scooter.  I asked him to flip a switch on a nearby wall and "cut the juice".  He had NO idea what the hell I was talking about. He thought I was asking him to get me a glass of juice!  :D 

Sepiatone

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On 3/12/2019 at 10:35 AM, DVDPhreak said:

I love hearing these expressions immortalized in movies that would otherwise be forgotten.  Two things:

Movie dialog didn't and doesn't necessary mirror real-life language.  If a line is used in a movie, that doesn't mean it came from real life.  It might have been invented, modified, or paraphrased by the screenwriters.  In short, people in the movies don't and didn't always talk like people in real life. 

Another kind of expressions immortalized in movies are those involving contemporary topical subjects.  Some movie dialog may refer to news events that occurred around the time the movie was made.  If the news events are forgotten, then the meaning of the dialog is hard to understand for modern viewers.  This is akin to watching those old SNL skits, many of which lampooned events of the day that are now forgotten.  In A Night at the Opera (1935), when Harpo refers to those "five kids up in Canada," he refers to a set of Canadian quintuplets that were quite famous at the time, but are quite unknown to us today.

 

I just want to amend my views above a little bit by saying sometimes movies and pop culture in general DO affect the way real-life people talk, as we all well know.  A memorable thing or line of a dialog in a movie may have been invented by the filmmakers, but it may enter into our language (go viral, so to speak) and become a real thing.  For instance, there wouldn't be the English expression "bunny-boiler" if it weren't for Fatal Attraction (1987).

 

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

When was the last time any of you used, or heard anyone else use the word "juice" to refer to electricity?

I recently used it with a nephew, helping me with setting up the charger for my wife's Rascal scooter.  I asked him to flip a switch on a nearby wall and "cut the juice".  He had NO idea what the hell I was talking about. He thought I was asking him to get me a glass of juice!  :D 

Sepiatone

For that matter I grew up with my folks saying "turn" the lights off and on, I think its a hold over from the gas light days when you had a gas **** that you turned off and on to light your fixtures.

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43 minutes ago, DVDPhreak said:

I just want to amend my views above a little bit by saying sometimes movies and pop culture in general DO affect the way real-life people talk, as we all well know.

My favorite thing in gangsta films is holding a pistol sideways when shooting. C'mon. Whomever thought that looked cool sure was a dummy. I see jerks do that on surveillance videos.

And guns that have hair triggers & go off unexpectedly? Only in the movies. Most real hand gun triggers have a release you have to press first, like the old fashioned "c o c k". (Dirty minded Otto)

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17 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

For that matter I grew up with my folks saying "turn" the lights off and on, I think its a hold over from the gas light days when you had a gas **** that you turned off and on to light your fixtures.

:o

What COULD that "4-star" word possibly have been?  :)

But too, many electric table lamps had and STILL have an "on/off" switch that you turn to operate.  But in a room with NO lamp providing the light, requesting the light be "turned" off is out of place.  And in many "classic" movies( "pre code" and earlier) electric lights were operated with "push-button" switches, so then "hit the lights" was too, probably pretty common.  Alicia and I, after moving out of our first apartment together, rented a house that had those kind of "push-button" fixtures, and with good aim you actually COULD "hit" the lights either on or off.  :) 

Sepiatone

Sepiatone 

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And re this whole "turning the lights on and off" thing here...

I now have to ask if back in the day when Dandy Don Meredith sang his old signature closing line song on Monday Night Football and when there was no doubt as to the outcome of the game, if it would have really had the same ring to it had he sang instead, "Switch out the lights, the party's over"???

(...probably not, huh) ;)

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Here ya go, CJ! HERE'S ya an old expression you don't hear much anymore and which was probably said by some characters in some movies back in the day:

"Now, THAT boy ought'a be bent over somebody's knee and taught some manners!"

(...I was reminded of THIS one while channel surfing last night, and when this certain big-butted and big-gutted man-child with this funny orange-y colored hair suddenly appeared on my TV set while he was mouthin' off about somethin' again with those thin little protruding lips of his)

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