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Credits Not Shown...One Reason


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Are you talking about end credits on the majority of films that run on TCM?

 

Most films back then did not have end credits. Occasional films would have a credit roll of the actors at the end but from the 1920s-1960s, credit rolls at the end of the movie were not common. Back then, all the credits appeared at the beginning of the movie.

 

It wasn't until the late 1960s that the trend towards both front (for the actors, directors, etc) and end titles (for all the other people working on the film) began.

 

Message was edited by: lzcutter because role and roll are two different things

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I don't know whats worst, having no end titles or having titles zipping by at 5 times normal speed. TCM is one of the FEW channels outside Pay-per-view that shows the original movie tiltles - especially the end titles. ( on later movies )

 

Most channels shows the end titles zipping by so fast, there is no way anyone can read them unless you record them and play them back at slower speeds. Some channels even crops the titles to one side while advertizing upcoming movies.

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I honestly could care less about title sequences or credits. Unless a film has a great title sequence like *Vertigo* and the credits have an original song like "The Wrestler" from the film *The Wrestler* I don't mind just seeing the movie and nothing else. If more filmmakers would use the title sequences as well as Hitchcock did, then I would have a problem. But that is one thing I like about classic films......quick title sequences and a *The End* at the end of the film......short and sweet!!

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> {quote:title=ChipHeartsMovies wrote:}{quote}

> In New York, many if not most people at new movies sit through credits and actively read them. Where my family lives (outside Atlanta), no one does. Wonder why?

 

I think the same goes for L.A., because so many people in the industry live there. And I assume some of them live in NYC, too.

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> {quote:title=ChipHeartsMovies wrote:}{quote}

> That's true, I am partially reading them to see if people I know were involved somewhere behind the scenes.

 

Sometimes it's also nice to see them if the movie you just watched was filmed in your hometown, they'll probably thank the mayor and the local chief of police, stuff like that.

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It depends on the studio. During the "Golden Age", Columbia rarely had closing credits, while Universal almost always did (and they had familiar theme music as accompaniment). During the pre-Code era, Warner Brothers did not. But later in the 30s it did.

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TV networks would be so happy if they didn't have to show credits at all. However, they are legally required by the studios to run them just like the studios are required by contracts with performers and the various unions to have credits.

 

There is a loophole that the networks have found however. Nothing in the contracts say how big the credits should be or how long they have to be on the screen. So they make them as small as they can and as fast as possible. They really don't care if the viewer can read them or not. They want them to get hooked on the start of the next show without giving them time to change the channel.

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> {quote:title=markfp2 wrote:}{quote}

> There is a loophole that the networks have found however. Nothing in the contracts say how big the credits should be or how long they have to be on the screen. So they make them as small as they can and as fast as possible. They really don't care if the viewer can read them or not. They want them to get hooked on the start of the next show without giving them time to change the channel.

 

I almost wish there was an easy way to close that legal loophole, so they'd have to show the credits at the same size and speed as the rest of the movie, but it'll probably never happen.

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If cable channels are forced to show credits at normal speed and not cropped then they would probably cut down the movie to fit into the block. Uncut movie channels are just the best movie channels out there because there are no commercials and without commercials means that they don't care about ratings.

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PrinceSaliano:

 

You mentioned the familiar theme music used for the end cast lists for Universal movies. We've all heard it hundreds of times.

Have you ever wondered what the name of that tune is, who composed it, and exactly when and how often it was used?

 

The name of the music is "Strange Faces", composed by Frank Skinner for the 1938 Universal picture "Strange Faces".

It was used as end cast list music for a total of 219 different Universal movies between 1938 and 1945.

In 1938 it was used 4 times.

In 1939: 35 times.

In 1940: 43 times.

In 1941: 38 times.

In 1942: 39 times.

In 1943: 31 times.

In 1944: 26 times.

In 1945: 3 times.

 

It was heard incidentally in two other Universal movies and in at least two trailers.

 

I wrote a detailed article on that music, along with a complete listing of usages, appearing in the March 2008 issue of "Classic Images".

 

.

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> {quote:title=musicalnovelty wrote:}{quote}

> PrinceSaliano:

>

> You mentioned the familiar theme music used for the end cast lists for Universal movies. We've all heard it hundreds of times.

> Have you ever wondered what the name of that tune is, who composed it, and exactly when and how often it was used?

>

> The name of the music is "Strange Faces", composed by Frank Skinner for the 1938 Universal picture "Strange Faces".

> It was used as end cast list music for a total of 219 different Universal movies between 1938 and 1945.

> In 1938 it was used 4 times.

> In 1939: 35 times.

> In 1940: 43 times.

> In 1941: 38 times.

> In 1942: 39 times.

> In 1943: 31 times.

> In 1944: 26 times.

> In 1945: 3 times.

>

> It was heard incidentally in two other Universal movies and in at least two trailers.

>

> I wrote a detailed article on that music, along with a complete listing of usages, appearing in the March 2008 issue of "Classic Images".

>

> .

Fascinating! I must dig out that issue. Thanks.

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