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There were a lot of groovy movies in the 1960's and the way to identify them often is by their peace signs, psychedelic music, flower power clothing, strobe lights, beaded curtains, trippy rabbit posters, rad pads and..sometimes if you are lucky, Vladimir Tretchikoff's famous "Chinese Girl" portrait [aka The Green Lady].

I tend to be more partial to the Swinging London scene films, though American ones are fun to watch also, so my choice is "I Love You, Alice B. Toklas" which seems to have a true hippie vibe. 

Second place for me, for grooviest movie ever not set necessarily in London, is "Barbarella".

I'm always open to new and unseen groovy flicks though, so what's your suggestion?

Addendum: Tretchikoff's Green Lady was first painted in 1952, and graced many a mantle in  British homes in its numerous prints. It has often been used in British films to show a dichotomy between the classic times of the 1950's in those environs, as contrasted with the new swinging lifestyles in the 1960's. Carnaby Street and Portobello Road boutiques were even selling kitschy clothes adorned with such Tretchi prints of mysterious Orientalism subjects by the time of the British Invasion. Hence The Green Lady has been used in films like "Alfie", "Performance" and "Frenzy" and has been rediscovered numerous times since it seems to be an indelible image in the popular consciousness of the British public of either bourgeois mediocrity or mysterious popular art.

If you've seen Bowie's video called "The Stars Are Out Tonight", or ones by the White Stripes, or even a Monty Python video, you might remember the greenish-hued lady on the wall.

Tretchikoff's masterpiece and original painting sold at auction in 2013 for almost a million pounds [982,050.00 to be exact!].

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Hmm. My first vote goes to the wonderfully entertaining 'The Touchables' set in mod London. Four stuck-on-themselves ditzy girls kidnap their favorite pop star for a night of would-be debauchery. To cover up their misdeed, they turn to their good friend, nice guy and pro wrestler (a beau whose name I can't recall) to fend off the inevitable bad guys raining on their parade. It's really a swank romp of a flick.

Another: the infamous Donald Camel's 'Performance' starring one of the Fox brothers (Michael?) and Mick Jagger. Avante-garde film-making. Odd.

 

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11 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

It wouldn't hurt TCM to run a Tom Laughlin series either, starting with 'Born Losers' ...eh Dargo? Your 'yondering days' finally deserve some recognition! y'ole reprobate! ;)

Ya know here Sarge, Laughlin's next Billy Jack movie (the 1971 one that used the titular character as the title) was filmed in Prescott AZ, a town I would first retire to about 9 years ago and before then moving here to Sedona a couple of years later. 

(...Prescott was also where the following year in 1972, Peckinpah would film the Steve McQueen starring movie Junior Bonner)

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For "swinging London" you could also watch The Knack and Smashing Time, among others. A Hard Day's Night and Help! are definitely groovy. Head tries too hard for my taste, but it's trying its best to be groovy. Blow-Up and Petulia have the "groovy gone sour" thing going on. And don't forget The Trip and Chappaqua.

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My fave is definitely The Cool Ones (1967), Warner Bros.' attempt to do an American-International-style teen musical. It starts on a TV show called Whiz Bam, an obvious homage (?) to Hullaballoo. Debbie Watson is a go-go dancer who dreams of being a singer, so she crashes a musical number by Glenn Campbell and wrestles the mike away from him, inspiring a new teen dance craze, the Tantrum. Phil Spector-like music mogul Roddy McDowell (!) catches the act and decides to pair her with a former teen idol on the skids to make a Sonny and Cher-type duo and the sky's the limit. They clash, fall in love, all the usual stuff. Luckily they know a bunch of chorus boys and girls who can break out into nonsensical musical numbers at any moment, which they do frequently. A special added treat is Mrs. Miller as the wardrobe lady who has to fill in at the last minute and sing. (She was a real, grandmotherly type who had her 15 minutes of fame singing standards off-key and got a couple of albums out of it.) My favorite line of dialogue is when the TV producer (Phil Harris) yells at her: "How dare you flip your wig on my program!" Its one legitimate credit is that it was directed by Gene Nelson, who was Warner's top dance guy back in the 1950's.  TCM has shown this gem a few times.

Another good one from the same year is The Love-Ins, about "underground" journalists James MacArthur and Susan Somebody who fall out when she becomes a follower of a "free-spirited" guru, Richard Todd, who turns out to be a charlatan. Lots of fun scenes of Central Casting "hippies" gamboling in the park and protesting in the streets. They all lay on the "groovy" really thickly and, of course, there are love beads and peace signs galore.

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9 hours ago, DougieB said:

 

I confess, I was having trouble thinking of any, until your avatar's Boob shot from Yellow Submarine (1968).

Searching Amazon, a recent package of low-rent "Mondo" movies included a BFI restoration of Primitive London (1965)--Which promised its exploitation goers "shocking" sights of strip clubs, but only offered a documentary on the changing trends and attitudes of Swingin' proto-Beatles mid-60's London, including a segment on the Mods vs. Rockers rivalry, for those establishment folk who didn't know what our young people were up to.

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On ‎3‎/‎16‎/‎2019 at 7:04 PM, EricJ said:

 

Searching Amazon, a recent package of low-rent "Mondo" movies included a BFI restoration of Primitive London (1965)--Which promised its exploitation goers "shocking" sights of strip clubs, but only offered a documentary on the changing trends and attitudes of Swingin' proto-Beatles mid-60's London, including a segment on the Mods vs. Rockers rivalry, for those establishment folk who didn't know what our young people were up to.

The "Mondo" series of films reminded me of The Wild Wild World of Jayne Mansfield (1968) in which "tour guide" Jayne surveys European nightlife as she twists and frugs to Rocky Roberts and the Airdailes and a topless female rock band. Throw in a nude beach, roadside hookers and some drag queens and you've got yourself a "groovy" movie.

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Oh God now you've reminded me of Girl on a Motorcycle.  Marianne Faithfull couldn't act, and she could barely sit on a motorcycle in front of rear-projection photography.

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Here's a couple fun ones: "I'll Never Forget What's-His-Name" starring Oliver Reed and a small appearance by Orson Welles. It's got a hilarious opening sequence where Reed, a fed-up corporate minion, strides through London in a business suit, clearly on his way to his office but scowling and carrying a hefty fire-axe. When he arrives at his place of employ, he savagely chops his own desk in half and declares himself through!

Another Reed film of that period, co-starring Michael Redgrave, is 'The Jokers'. Its a fairly nifty caper film. Reed and Redgrave play a couple of carousing, party-going decadents (brothers) who heist some jewels as a prank and to prove some philosophical point about class corruption and capitalism in English society. They intend to give the loot back afterwards. Only, when they go to retrieve the goods from where they stashed it, its gone missing.

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