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Ann Sheridan


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46 minutes ago, Arteesto said:

Agree...love her movies.

I found this bio on Amazon..pricey tho..approx $75.00

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Sometimes the biobibliographies are just detailed descriptions of their work, not much about their personal life. I think these are often put together by people who study film at the university level, so they're kind of dry and don't read like a life story. But at least it's something. There's another biobibliography I saw a few years ago on Ann Sothern. It included descriptions of everything she did, including TV commercials. But it didn't really provide insights into who she was as an actress or as a person.

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7 hours ago, arpirose said:

Ms Sheridan is one of my favorites.  She was one of these underrated actresses that never got her due.  IN CITY FOR CONQUEST, she is at her best, giving her heart and soul to her character.

She's gorgeous too and really does have "ooomph"!

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Ann Sheridan at the peak of her glamour, singing "Love Isn't Born, It's Made" in Thank Your Lucky Stars. No one looked quite so good in a snood as Annie. Something else Sheridan demonstrates in this musical number, along with a contemporary sounding singing voice: Style, baby, style!

 

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11 hours ago, arpirose said:

Ms Sheridan is one of my favorites.  She was one of these underrated actresses that never got her due.  IN CITY FOR CONQUEST, she is at her best, giving her heart and soul to her character.

No actress that was under contract for Warner Bros during the Bette Davis era 'got her due'  (other than Davis);    Warner films were mostly star driven male films (featuring Cagney, Flynn,  E.G. Robinson,  and later Bogie),   with the few 'women films' set aside for Davis.    This impacted the careers of DeHavilland and Lupino (who both 'got their due' once their WB contract was up) and Sheridan.     Sheridan started to 'act up' and this convinced Warner to hire Alexis Smith.      Once Crawford showed up (Jack Warner's way of trying to keep Davis 'in-line'),  there were few opportunities for any of the other WB actresses.

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

No actress that was under contract for Warner Bros during the Bette Davis era 'got her due'  (other than Davis);    Warner films were mostly star driven male films (featuring Cagney, Flynn,  E.G. Robinson,  and later Bogie),   with the few 'women films' set aside for Davis.    This impacted the careers of DeHavilland and Lupino (who both 'got their due' once there WB contract was up) and Sheridan.     Sheridan started to 'act up' and this convinced Warner to hire Alexis Smith.      Once Crawford showed up (Jack Warner's way of trying to keep Davis 'in-line'),  there were few opportunities for any of the other WB actresses.

Probably Ann Sheridan got the scraps-- scripts that Davis & Crawford didn't want to do. Things like NORA PRENTISS and THE UNFAITHFUL, where she's the lead in a woman's picture (melodrama). But one thing Sheridan had going in her favor is that she had chemistry with Cagney and Flynn...so she worked well as a female sidekick in action programmers. Plus she could sing. So she was actually more versatile than Davis & Crawford.

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Ann was one of the few leading ladies who could stand up to James Cagney. She had a way with one liners and she excelled at playing a tough dame on the outside who would soften if the right guy came along. It was Angels With Dirty Faces, in a supporting role to Cagney, which really put Sheridan on the map and made Warners decide to groom her into a star. The price she paid was all that "oomph girl" publicity.

But in her second film with Cagney, Torrid Zone, Sheridan stole the picture away from the studio's foremost tough guy. That, plus the delicious chemistry the two had on screen, made the film a memorable fun time. Plus all those great one liners. Next came City for Conquest, with Jim as a boxer and Ann ambitious to be a dancer (with Anthony Quinn yet). Cagney gave of his best in that film, but Sheridan held her own.

There could have been a fourth film with the two of them together, but, alas, it was not to be. Sheridan was on strike with Warners over money and turned down the title role in The Strawberry Blonde. Too bad, though a break for Rita Hayworth, of course.

Cagney and Sheridan were never co-starred again. He was gone from Warners by the end of 1942 and by the time he returned in '49 Sheridan was then gone from the studio.

Such is fate, but the three times they were teamed together remain memorable occasions. For my money, Cagney never had a better leading lady.

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After watching STEEL TOWN, I rewatched COME NEXT SPRING (1956) last night.

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Ann Sheridan and Steve Cochran do some of their best acting in this late Republic crowd pleaser. Sheridan has a lot of chemistry with Cochran, which is essential for the plot to work. He plays a Depression era drifter returning home after several years away. When he shows up, he realizes that his estranged wife is still trying to shut him out of her life. But of course she still loves him and can't be without him. The kids need him too.

The day for night photography is a little off in spots (too bright to be believed as night time), and the ending is a bit sappy but for the most part, it's a very good film. The supporting cast is excellent (Walter Brennan, Edgar Buchanan, Mae Clarke, James Best) and the child actors (Sherry Jackson & Richard Eyer) give sincere performances. 

It's currently on YouTube.

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9 hours ago, shutoo said:

I loved her as the self centered actress in The Man Who Came to Dinner...and those fantastic hand clips on her blouse!  Image result for the man who came to dinner 1942

To give you an idea of what slave drivers Warner Brothers were with those under contract, Sheridan later related that she was jumping back and forth between the set of this comedy and Kings Row at the same time. But she still only got paid one paycheck for the two films. There was no extra money - she was paid for her time on the set, not how many films she was appearing in simultaneously.

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Sheridan called Kings Row her favourite film, by the way.

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Sheridan could really sell a song. Here she not only brings old time turn-of-the-century glamour but a sense of soulfulness to "Time Waits For No One," from SHINE ON HARVEST MOON.

Years later, in an interview, the actress was informed that her singing voice had been dubbed by the studio in this film. I guess Ann never watched the movie because she seemed surprised by the news and said that she had sung her numbers on the set. She seemed to have a shrug of the shoulders, what-can-you-do attitude about it. Besides she was more interested in making a living in the '60s (the time of the interview) than whatever may have happened in an old film of her's.

Sorry the quality of the video is so poor. SHINE ON HARVEST MOON comes on TCM once in a while, looking a lot better than this clip.

 

 

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In ERROL FLYNN'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY MY WICKED, WICKED WAYS, he recalled how he and his pal, Ann Sheridan would imbibe on Vodka to cover their tracks on the set  I believe she developed a dr***ing problem.If it is true, addiction problems are harder for women to lick. Here is an article about Ann that seems interesting.  There is no sugar coating here.

https://www.dametown.com/you-dont-get-called-the-oomph-girl-for-nothing/

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