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Pregnant and showing in 1952!


slaytonf
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Couldn't believe my eyes and ears this morning watching You For Me (1952).  Jane Greer herself says the word of her sister.  The sister herself wears maternity clothes and is distinctly swelled.  They still don't say prostitute, tho. . . .

 

So was this the first?  Hard to think so for such a low-profile, and low- other things movie--regardless of Herself's appearance.  And when did prostitute first appear?

 

Oh, and there is butt humor, too.  Foreshadowings of the Farrelly Bros.?

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12 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I never saw it but had read that the 1948 "Apartment For Peggy" was the first that had a pregnant woman "showing", don't know if they said the word pregnant in it. 

Apartment for Peggy (1948) is a favorite that I've seen several times.  Jeanne Crain was shown in maternity clothes that made Peggy's pregnancy pretty obvious.  I don't remember if the word "pregnant" was used, however.

Image result for apartment for peggy

 

And Elizabeth Taylor was similarly shown in maternity clothes in Father's Little Dividend (1951):

Image result for father's little dividend

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No question -- Lucy was as authentic as she could be in showing her real-life pregnancy on I Love Lucy -- even if they couldn't use the word "pregnant."  (The name of the 1952 episode in which Lucy finds out she's pregnant is entitled "Lucy Is Enceinte.")

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15 minutes ago, BingFan said:

No question -- Lucy was as authentic as she could be in showing her pregnancy on I Love Lucy -- even if they couldn't use the word "pregnant."  (The name of the 1952 episode in which Lucy finds out she's pregnant is entitled "Lucy Is Enceinte.")

Even being married and pregnant, they still had to use separate beds.

i-love-lucy-separate-beds.jpg?q=65&enabl

 

Can't find the hospital scene but "Lucy Goes Into Labor" broke TV viewer records. Received a lot of hate mail as well.  Hard to believe today how uptight some were on the subject.

 

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During the filming of SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS, VERONICA LAKE was six months pregnant.  Sturges was quite upset about this development.  If you watch the film, you will notice a very pregnant Veronica Lake. Here is blurb from Wikipedia describing the situation.

Veronica Lake was six months pregnant at the beginning of production, a fact she did not disclose to Sturges until filming began. Sturges was so furious that, according to Lake, he had to be physically restrained.[8] Sturges consulted with Lake's doctor to see if she could perform the part, and hired former Tournament of Roses queen Cheryl Walker as Lake's double.[5] Edith Head, Hollywood's most renowned costume designer, was tasked to find ways of concealing Lake's condition. Reportedly, Lake was disliked by some of her co-stars. McCrea refused to work with her again, and subsequently turned down a lead role with her in I Married a Witch. Fredric March, who took the latter part, didn't much enjoy Lake either.[9] However, McCrea got along famously with Sturges, and afterward presented him with a watch engraved "for the finest direction I've ever had." Sturges' assistant director, Anthony Mann, also was influenced heavily by his experience on the production.[10]

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14 minutes ago, Hibi said:

THIS IS IT! No matter how many times I watch that scene I still crack up at the trio running around then leaving Lucy there by herself!

Absolutely one of my favorite scenes in all of I Love Lucy!  I love it when they yell at each other, in unison, "Somebody call a cab!!!"

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I'm confused what is being discussed here;  Is it that no American film showed "pregnant and showing" until the late 40s, REGARDLESS of their martial status,  OR that wasn't shown for a NEVER married women until then?

Hey that production code was restrictive in many silly ways,  but I can't see what would be objectionable about showing a women that had been married (or is still married)  as "pregnant and showing".

PS:  I could somewhat understand not showing a women like Kitty Foyle as "pregnant and showing" since she quickly divorced after getting pregnant and divorced was frowned upon.

 

 

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7 hours ago, hamradio said:

Even being married and pregnant, they still had to use separate beds.

i-love-lucy-separate-beds.jpg?q=65&enabl

I believe the only reason they were able to even show couple's beds at all on TV during this time was because Lucy and Desi were married in real life.

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16 minutes ago, sagebrush said:

I believe the only reason they were able to even show couple's beds at all on TV during this time was because Lucy and Desi were married in real life.

I Love Lucy was not the first TV show to depict a pregnancy. It was an earlier sitcom called Mary Kay and Johnny starring real-life marrieds Mary Kay and Johnny Stearns. Their series ran from 1947 to 1950.

Mary Kay Stearns became pregnant in real life in 1948, and it was written into the plot. The Stearnses were also shown sharing a double bed.

At the end of 1948, the Stearnses real-life son Christopher, a newborn who was only a few weeks old at the time, appeared on the program and he became a regularly featured character in 1949.

Screen Shot 2019-03-28 at 4.39.30 PM.png

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7 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I Love Lucy was not the first TV show to depict a pregnancy. It was an earlier sitcom called Mary Kay and Johnny starring real-life marrieds Mary Kay and Johnny Stearns. Their series ran from 1947 to 1950.

Mary Kay Stearns became pregnant in real life in 1948, and it was written into the plot. The Stearnses were also shown sharing a double bed.

At the end of 1948, the Stearnses real-life son Christopher, a newborn who was only a few weeks old at the time, appeared on the program and he became a regularly featured character in 1949.

Screen Shot 2019-03-28 at 4.39.30 PM.png

Wow, I've never even heard of that show! It was much earlier than I LOVE LUCY, too. Thanks for the clarification. :)

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3 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

We don't need no stinking walls of Jericho!!       

If you want to see over the top sensitivity on the subject of pregnancy / where do babies come from, watch "The Bluebird" (1940).  It's the expecting mother's scene. During the early 20th century even making that subtle innuendo in the film raised eyebrows.  Fairy tale was written during the Edwardian time period.

The sillinest of the scene shows how taboo this subject matter was.  DON"T EVEN THINK of trying to sneak in the truth on screen unless one wants the theatre torched and the manager tarred and feathered.

BB-Frame05a-lovers.jpg

 

Trivia...The 1917 silent version portrayed the high infant mortality rate before modern medicine (all the dead brothers and sisters)

 

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9 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I'm confused what is being discussed here;  Is it that no American film showed "pregnant and showing" until the late 40s, REGARDLESS of their martial status,  OR that wasn't shown for a NEVER married women until then?

Hey that production code was restrictive in many silly ways,  but I can't see what would be objectionable about showing a women that had been married (or is still married)  as "pregnant and showing".

PS:  I could somewhat understand not showing a women like Kitty Foyle as "pregnant and showing" since she quickly divorced after getting pregnant and divorced was frowned upon.

 

 

That was my point.  Until, as posted here, the late 40s, women even at the point of labor remained svelte and lissome.  And the most elaborate and circumlocutory euphemisms were used to describe the condition.  Even the phrase 'going to have a baby' is rare.  It's my impression that even under the sanction of marriage, the censors at the Hays office were still uncomfortable with this most intimate aspect of human biology.

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38 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

That was my point.  Until, as posted here, the late 40s, women even at the point of labor remained svelte and lissome.  And the most elaborate and circumlocutory euphemisms were used to describe the condition.  Even the phrase 'going to have a baby' is rare.  It's my impression that even under the sanction of marriage, the censors at the Hays office were still uncomfortable with this most intimate aspect of human biology.

One of the best is "a cake in the oven".

In an episode of "Law and Order SVU", Ice-T said "a devil cake in the oven". :lol:

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19 hours ago, hamradio said:

Regarding the subject when dealing with kids, Hanna Barbera took the bold initiative of having a cartoon character pregnant and showing in "The Flintstones" - 1963.

5df89b88d5b92ef3cc65b543efb3cae1.jpg

 

 

Gotta remember that the "target" audience of THE FLINTSTONES weren't kids, but their parents.  But we kids did take it over,and too, most of US were "boomers" who by that time had younger and "kid" brothers and sisters and saw Mom pregnant a few times, so the image wasn't that confusing or upsetting.   And an OT but amusing(to me) aside.....

On a rerun episode last night of CBC's excellent "Schitts Creek" , Chris Elliott, trying to get Catherine O'Hara to guess the sex of him and his wife's impending newborn, tries to cajole her with the incentive, " C'mon.  I'll give you THREE GUESSES!"  :D 

Sepiatone

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