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UNJUSTLY FORGOTTEN CLASSIC FILMS


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My vote would go to FRANK BORZAGE'S  1937 HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT.

This rarely seen film is full of romantic atmosphere  between lovers played by CHARLES BOYER & JEAN ARTHUR. Ms Arthur as Irene is unhappily married to her shipping magnet husband played by Colin Clive.  While in Paris, she meets the charming head waiter played by Boyer.  That is when her troubles begin.  Clive is a possessive and jealous husband who makes his wife's life a living hell.  Clive's character hounds Irene throughout the film.  The ending results in Clive's character committing suicide.I do not know how The HAYS OFFICE allowed this.


Frank Borzage was the king of romantic films that were not cloying but full of drama and suspense with great atmosphere. History is made at Night is one of his best that is never shown.

Jean Arthur and Charles Boyer in History Is Made at Night (1937)Jean Arthur in History Is Made at Night (1937)

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13 minutes ago, arpirose said:

My vote would go to FRANK BORZAGE'S  1937 HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT.

This rarely seen film is full of romantic atmosphere  between lovers played by CHARLES BOYER & JEAN ARTHUR. Ms Arthur as Irene is unhappily married to her shipping magnet husband played by Colin Clive.  While in Paris, she meets the charming head waiter played by Boyer.  That is when her troubles begin.  Clive is a possessive and jealous husband who makes his wife's life a living hell.  Clive's character hounds Irene throughout the film.  The ending results in Clive's character committing suicide.I do not know how The HAYS OFFICE allowed this.


Frank Borzage was the king of romantic films that were not cloying but full of drama and suspense with great atmosphere. History is made at Night is one of his best that is never shown.

Jean Arthur and Charles Boyer in History Is Made at Night (1937)Jean Arthur in History Is Made at Night (1937)

Big fan of History is made at Night.    Hasn't TCM shown this film in the last few years?   I know I have seen it on some station fairly recently.    

But yea,  United Artist films are not shown often on any of the 'old movie' type stations because these stations are affiliates of still existing major studios (or their corporate partners).    I just love Jean Arthur! (and Charlie isn't bad either).

Image result for jean arthur

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5 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Big fan of History is made at Night.    Hasn't TCM shown this film in the last few years?   I know I have seen it on some station fairly recently.    

But yea,  United Artist films are not shown often on any of the 'old movie' type stations because these stations are affiliates of still existing major studios (or their corporate partners).    I just love Jean Arthur! (and Charlie isn't bad either).

Image result for jean arthur

Not since 2015.

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23 hours ago, arpirose said:

My vote would go to FRANK BORZAGE'S  1937 HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT.

This rarely seen film is full of romantic atmosphere  between lovers played by CHARLES BOYER & JEAN ARTHUR. Ms Arthur as Irene is unhappily married to her shipping magnet husband played by Colin Clive.  While in Paris, she meets the charming head waiter played by Boyer.  That is when her troubles begin.  Clive is a possessive and jealous husband who makes his wife's life a living hell.  Clive's character hounds Irene throughout the film.  The ending results in Clive's character committing suicide.I do not know how The HAYS OFFICE allowed this.


Frank Borzage was the king of romantic films that were not cloying but full of drama and suspense with great atmosphere. History is made at Night is one of his best that is never shown.

Jean Arthur and Charles Boyer in History Is Made at Night (1937)Jean Arthur in History Is Made at Night (1937)

I so totally agree with you, Arpirose.

I usually am going way back in time, to the silents and Depression and war years for these forgotten classics, but there are even much more recent films which seem to be forgotten that I remember fondly like "Being John Malkovitch", "M. Butterfly" and even the controversial Jean-Luc Godard film, "Hail Mary".

Great topic to ponder...

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These are hard to find, so it could be why they are forgotten. Regular TCM viewers may know them by heart, but I hardly ever find anybody else who knows they exist. Excuse me in advance for verbally vomiting all over this thread.

Forgotten Faces (1928) Paramount - A man wants out of prison to protect his daughter from his tarantula of an ex-wife. He promises the warden he will not touch his wife if he is allowed a furlough. But does he actually keep this promise?

Nothing But the Truth (1929) Paramount -This early talkie with Richard Dix as a stock broker shows he was a natural for the talkies. What went wrong in Cimarron I will never know.

Love Parade (1929) Paramount - Such natural performances for an early talking picture you would think it was made on another planet. Being directed by Ernst Lubitsch probably helped.

Dynamite (1929) MGM - DeMille's first foray into sound was very interesting.

Young Man of Manhattan (1930) Paramount - A prohibition slice of life with Ginger Rogers as a teen flapper.

Such Men are Dangerous (1930) Fox - A wealthy but ugly man has his bride run out on him on their wedding night. He fakes his own death, has plastic surgery, then returns to seduce her.

Over The Hill (1931) Fox - Shows how having children is definitely not old age insurance.

Palmy Days (1931) Sam Goldwyn - This little fluff piece was probably a real spirit lifter during the depression.

Blonde Crazy (1931) Warner Bros. - Yes, everybody has seen this one and TCM plays it frequently. But IMHO it is the best film for demonstrating the magic and chemistry in the duo of Cagney and Blondell. And Ray Milland's actions still make no sense to me.

24 Hours (1931) Paramount - A man is accused of murdering his mistress. He and his wife rekindle their relationship over trying to prove his innocence. Only in the precode era.

Six Hours to Live (1932) Fox - Is it cruel to bring a man back to life if he only has six hours to live?

By Whose Hand? (1932) Columbia - Ben Lyon is terrific in this fast moving precode as a reporter who gets on a train on an impulse to follow a pretty girl and runs into a big story. This was shown exactly once - Jan 11, 2007 - on TCM in a beautiful print. Where is it?

The Big Broadcast (1932) Paramount - Universal (which owns the 1929-48 Paramount film library) has put out the sequels to this on DVD. Why this fun lively film with tons of surrealism that started it all is not available I do not know.

Night of June 13 (1932) Paramount - Four households on a suburban street are intertwined in various ways, and then one night one member of the four households is murdered.

Blessed Event (1932) Warner Brothers - A signature role for fast talking Lee Tracy.

Two Seconds (1932) Warner Brothers - What happens in a man's mind during the two seconds it takes to execute him by electrocution. Great acting by Edward G. Robinson.

Turn Back the Clock (1933) MGM - Lee Tracy gets to live his life over on an alternate path and learns that his original life was not so bad after all.

Terror Aboard (1933) Paramount - How do you kill over a dozen people onboard a yacht without any of them catching on as to who is to blame before you are done?

Crime of the Century (1933) Paramount  - A man confesses a murder to the police before it happens. When it does happen just as described it is not as open and shut as you would think.

Double Harness (1933) RKO - A perfectly good marriage is ruined by love. Better known since TCM got the rights problems straightened out.

Cross Fire (1933) RKO - The best B western ever. It shows a west in transition after WWI, and had a rather unique gangster angle built into. Oddly enough, TCM has shown it only three times, the last time being April 2011.

Dangerous Corner (1934) RKO - A theft and a suicide make everyone concerned believe one thing led to the other. Then a year later the truth comes out.

College Scandal (1935) Paramount - This is a very enjoyable combination college campus murder mystery, romance, and a comedy with even some musical numbers thrown in. You wouldn't think these things would mix together that well, but this film really works. Maybe the reason it is buried in obscurity is that there are no real stars in the film.

Stolen Harmony (1935) Paramount - George Raft gets out of prison and goes to work for a traveling band but he just can't shake those invisible stripes. One of the few films that shows big band leader Ben Bernie in action

Thanks a Million (1937) Fox - Great film about old time radio and blow hard politicians.

Girls Can Play (1937) Columbia - Is a druggist using a girl's baseball team as a front for a criminal enterprise? And who would ever suspect such a thing? Features a young Rita Hayworth who is a standout in the cast.

Exposed (1938) Universal - Saucy Glenda Farrell plays a reporter who gets involved in a big ruse and risks being "exposed". Shows she can sizzle with somebody other than Barton McLane. A great cameo by Eddie "Rochester" Anderson.

It All Came True (1940) Warner Brothers- Bogart would never have agreed to be in a film where he wears a hat AND pajamas just two years later. But here he hams it up and even laughs. A great musical comedy treat, but you'll never get me to believe that anyone would find Jeffrey Lynn to be the man of their dreams.

Flight From Destiny (1941) Warner Brothers- Thomas Mitchell in a rare leading role as a philosophy teacher who has a short time to live. What he chooses to do with that time is rather shocking.

Among the Living (1941) Paramount - A man has an evil twin on the loose, and Susan Hayward is helping him fit into society so that nobody would ever think he is out of place - she doesn't know he is crazy. Great early performance by Hayward.

Footsteps in the Dark (1941) Warner Brothers - Errol Flynn as a blue blood who has a secret life as an author of crime novels who winds up in a real life murder mystery.

San Diego I Love You (1944) Universal - My favorite wartime film involving the war. You have a man with an invention who wants to sell it to the military, a girl trying to keep her goofy family together as they travel to San Diego to try and make the sale, the housing shortage in San Diego caused by the war,  Buster Keaton as a bus driver, and Irene Ryan as an aircraft factory worker who knows her rights!

Nine Girls (1944) Columbia - How do you make a compelling murder mystery with few men in the cast because everybody is in the army at the time? This film answers that question.

Vacation From Marriage (1945)  MGM - A plain mousy couple is thrown from a rut by WWII, and are not sure they want to go back to that rut afterwards.

Strange Affair of Uncle Harry (1945) Republic - George Sanders plays a man whose family lost its fortune in the depression. He finds a bride in middle age, but his sister is determined to use every passive aggressive means at her disposal to stop the wedding. It's good to see Sanders play an (almost) normal person for a change.

One Way to Love  (1946)  Columbia - Misleading title. Plot is about a writing duo with a huge contract who need the third member of their team back because he is the one with the talent. He is engaged to a rich girl who thinks writing for radio is beneath him. Very funny vehicle for Chester Morris.

The Dark Mirror (1946)  Universal - One of two twins has probably murdered a man in what seems like the perfect crime.

It Had to Be You (1947) Columbia - Ginger Rogers was a little too old to be playing the runaway bride, but this one has a great fantasy angle that makes it worth it.

The Senator Was Indiscreet (1947) Universal - William Powell plays a crooked untalented blowhard who wants to be president. Sound familiar? Look for the great cameo at the end of the film.

Night Has a Thousand Eyes (1948) Paramount - Edward G. Robinson plays a psychic who can't do anything to change the premonitions that he has.

Intruder In the Dust (1949) MGM - A film about lynching and race relations in the South that shows that heroes can be found in the most unlikely places.

Mrs. Mike (1949) United Artists - Dick Powell is a Canadian Mountie  whose young bride is not prepared for the hardships of living in the arctic.

Alias Nick Beal (1949) Paramount - I can't help but think of Broadcast News and Albert Brooks' speech about the devil - "What do you think the devil's going to look like if he's around? ... Nobody is going to be taken in by a guy with a long, red, pointy tail!". Enter Ray Milland.

Dark City (1950) Paramount - Charlton Heston in a noir, if you can conceive of such a thing.

Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye (1950)  Independent - Sort of like White Heat in an alternate universe if Cody Jarrett had been sane.

September Affair (1950)  Paramount - An unhappily married man and a single woman meet in Italy, fall in love, miss a plane that crashes and are pronounced dead. This gives them the chance to start their lives over in Europe - during the production code era? Not a chance. Beautifully acted by Joseph Cotten and Joan Fontaine.

Mr. Denning Drives North (1951) British - A man kills his daughter's sleezy beau by accident, disposes of the body, then goes slowly insane when the body is never found.

The Whistle at Eaton Falls (1951) Columbia - It is not  easy to run a factory, not fire anybody, and compete, even in the days before big corporations ran everything.

Come Fill the Cup (1951) Warner Bros. - One of Cagney's best mature roles as a recovering alcoholic.

Five Fingers (1952) Fox - Spy cat and mouse film with a great ironic ending.

An Inspector Calls (1954) British - Actually it seems like either Rod Sterling or Alfred Hitchcock called in this suspense/thriller/fantasy with Alistair Sim as the titular inspector.

End of the Affair (1955) British - There is an amazing amount of human realism for the 1950s  in this film about marital infidelity.

Man in the Backseat (1960) British - When everything that could go wrong in what was supposed to be a simple theft does indeed go wrong.

Jigsaw (1962) British - Maybe Rudy Giuiliani was right. Maybe you do find the big crimes by going after the small ones.

The Slender Thread (1965) Paramount - A woman has taken an overdose and THEN calls the suicide hotline. Great acting by Sidney Poitier and Ann Bancroft.

J.T. (1969) - A Christmastime made for TV special about a poor kid bonding with a stray cat.

Wanda (1970) - Now on Criterion, so it could be argued that it is not that forgotten. About a woman who could not think less of herself unless you allowed her to use negative numbers.

The Last Child (1971) - Made for TV movie about a futuristic US where couples are limited to one child because of overpopulation.

Love Among the Ruins (1975) - Katharine Hepburn employs Lawrence Olivier as her lawyer in a  breach of promise suit and she seems to have no memory that the two were lovers decades before. The memory of her has caused him to stay single all of these years, so obviously he is annoyed.

Wise Blood (1979) - A man is a complete cynic about faith except when it comes to his broken down car. Very quirky.

Christmas Without Snow (1980) - Made for TV movie about a divorcee starting over in San Francisco.

One Dark Night (1982) - On DVD, but this teen horror flick is different.

The Paint Job (1992) - Completely lost as far as I can tell. A quirky little mystery/romantic triangle. There isn't even a Wikipedia article about it.

The Prestige (2006) Warner Brothers - WB probably didn't have much faith in this one. They released it in October of 2006. The film is like one big magic trick. What does that last line mean?

 

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4 hours ago, calvinnme said:

Nothing But the Truth (1929) Paramount -This early talkie with Richard Dix as a stock broker shows he was a natural for the talkies. What went wrong in Cimarron I will never know.

I blame whoever directed Cimarron--Dix has a BAD case of Silent Film Star Syndrome in this. It's a shame, because he's excellent in The Public Defender (1931) (speaking of films that ought to be on TCM more often...).

In the meantime, many of the films you list are controlled by studios other than Warner Bros. I've seen some of them on TCM in the last decade, but apparently the TCM programmers have to go to some extra effort and expense to license these titles from the rights-holders.

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1 minute ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

I blame whoever directed Cimarron--Dix has a BAD case of Silent Film Star Syndrome in this. It's a shame, because he's excellent in The Public Defender (1931) (speaking of films that ought to be on TCM more often...). 

In the meantime, many of the films you list are controlled by studios other than Warner Bros. I've seen some of them on TCM in the last decade, but apparently the TCM programmers have to go to some extra effort and expense to license these titles from the rights-holders. 

Funny you mention The Public Defender, because I almost put that on my list too. I love that film! Yes, I know the reason nobody knows about these films is largely because of the studios that own them - Paramount and Universal have many very good films from the classic era that nobody has seen since American Movie Classics changed format in 2002.

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Except for THE QUIET MAN (1952) most Republic feature films, and there are nearly a thousand of them, are forgotten and do not air on TCM.

Rights owner Paramount digitally restored about 800 of them a few years ago. So these films are available and ready for audiences.

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6 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Except for THE QUIET MAN (1952) most Republic feature films, and there are nearly a thousand of them, are forgotten and do not air on TCM.

Rights owner Paramount digitally restored about 800 of them a few years ago. So these films are available and ready for audiences. 

"The Cheaters" is another Republic film - not a western - that TCM aired once about 10-12 years ago at Christmastime. It seemed to be in excellent condition.

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10 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

"The Cheaters" is another Republic film - not a western - that TCM aired once about 10-12 years ago at Christmastime. It seemed to be in excellent condition.

Screen shot 2017-12-19 at 2.33.50 PM.png

Yes, thanks for mentioning that one. It aired on Christmas Eve and again on Christmas Day in 2008. Then TCM finally rebroadcast it in December 2017. It should really air each Christmas.

If they can show THE QUIET MAN without fail each year for Oscar month, they can certainly keep showing THE CHEATERS. Oscar-related scheduling shouldn't be the only time they splurge.

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On 3/30/2019 at 11:48 AM, calvinnme said:

These are hard to find, so it could be why they are forgotten. Regular TCM viewers may know them by heart, but I hardly ever find anybody else who knows they exist. Excuse me in advance for verbally vomiting all over this thread.

Forgotten Faces (1928) Paramount - A man wants out of prison to protect his daughter from his tarantula of an ex-wife. He promises the warden he will not touch his wife if he is allowed a furlough. But does he actually keep this promise?

Nothing But the Truth (1929) Paramount -This early talkie with Richard Dix as a stock broker shows he was a natural for the talkies. What went wrong in Cimarron I will never know.

Love Parade (1929) Paramount - Such natural performances for an early talking picture you would think it was made on another planet. Being directed by Ernst Lubitsch probably helped.

Dynamite (1929) MGM - DeMille's first foray into sound was very interesting.

Young Man of Manhattan (1930) Paramount - A prohibition slice of life with Ginger Rogers as a teen flapper.

Such Men are Dangerous (1930) Fox - A wealthy but ugly man has his bride run out on him on their wedding night. He fakes his own death, has plastic surgery, then returns to seduce her.

Over The Hill (1931) Fox - Shows how having children is definitely not old age insurance.

Palmy Days (1931) Sam Goldwyn - This little fluff piece was probably a real spirit lifter during the depression.

Blonde Crazy (1931) Warner Bros. - Yes, everybody has seen this one and TCM plays it frequently. But IMHO it is the best film for demonstrating the magic and chemistry in the duo of Cagney and Blondell. And Ray Milland's actions still make no sense to me.

24 Hours (1931) Paramount - A man is accused of murdering his mistress. He and his wife rekindle their relationship over trying to prove his innocence. Only in the precode era.

Six Hours to Live (1932) Fox - Is it cruel to bring a man back to life if he only has six hours to live?

By Whose Hand? (1932) Columbia - Ben Lyon is terrific in this fast moving precode as a reporter who gets on a train on an impulse to follow a pretty girl and runs into a big story. This was shown exactly once - Jan 11, 2007 - on TCM in a beautiful print. Where is it?

The Big Broadcast (1932) Paramount - Universal (which owns the 1929-48 Paramount film library) has put out the sequels to this on DVD. Why this fun lively film with tons of surrealism that started it all is not available I do not know.

Night of June 13 (1932) Paramount - Four households on a suburban street are intertwined in various ways, and then one night one member of the four households is murdered.

Blessed Event (1932) Warner Brothers - A signature role for fast talking Lee Tracy.

Turn Back the Clock (1933) MGM - Lee Tracy gets to live his life over on an alternate path and learns that his original life was not so bad after all.

Terror Aboard (1933) Paramount - How do you kill over a dozen people onboard a yacht without any of them catching on as to who is to blame before you are done?

Crime of the Century (1933) Paramount  - A man confesses a murder to the police before it happens. When it does happen just as described it is not as open and shut as you would think.

Double Harness (1933) RKO - A perfectly good marriage is ruined by love. Better known since TCM got the rights problems straightened out.

Cross Fire (1933) RKO - The best B western ever. It shows a west in transition after WWI, and had a rather unique gangster angle built into. Oddly enough, TCM has shown it only three times, the last time being April 2011.

Dangerous Corner (1934) RKO - A theft and a suicide make everyone concerned believe one thing led to the other. Then a year later the truth comes out.

College Scandal (1935) Paramount - This is a very enjoyable combination college campus murder mystery, romance, and a comedy with even some musical numbers thrown in. You wouldn't think these things would mix together that well, but this film really works. Maybe the reason it is buried in obscurity is that there are no real stars in the film.

Stolen Harmony (1935) Paramount - George Raft gets out of prison and goes to work for a traveling band but he just can't shake those invisible stripes. One of the few films that shows big band leader Ben Bernie in action

Thanks a Million (1937) Fox - Great film about old time radio and blow hard politicians.

Girls Can Play (1937) Columbia - Is a druggist using a girl's baseball team as a front for a criminal enterprise? And who would ever suspect such a thing? Features a young Rita Hayworth who is a standout in the cast.

Exposed (1938) Universal - Saucy Glenda Farrell plays a reporter who gets involved in a big ruse and risks being "exposed". Shows she can sizzle with somebody other than Barton McLane. A great cameo by Eddie "Rochester" Anderson.

It All Came True (1940) Warner Brothers- Bogart would never have agreed to be in a film where he wears a hat AND pajamas just two years later. But here he hams it up and even laughs. A great musical comedy treat, but you'll never get me to believe that anyone would find Jeffrey Lynn to be the man of their dreams.

Flight From Destiny (1941) Warner Brothers- Thomas Mitchell in a rare leading role as a philosophy teacher who has a short time to live. What he chooses to do with that time is rather shocking.

Among the Living (1941) Paramount - A man has an evil twin on the loose, and Susan Hayward is helping him fit into society so that nobody would ever think he is out of place - she doesn't know he is crazy. Great early performance by Hayward.

Footsteps in the Dark (1941) Warner Brothers - Errol Flynn as a blue blood who has a secret life as an author of crime novels who winds up in a real life murder mystery.

San Diego I Love You (1944) Universal - My favorite wartime film involving the war. You have a man with an invention who wants to sell it to the military, a girl trying to keep her goofy family together as they travel to San Diego to try and make the sale, the housing shortage in San Diego caused by the war,  Buster Keaton as a bus driver, and Irene Ryan as an aircraft factory worker who knows her rights!

Nine Girls (1944) Columbia - How do you make a compelling murder mystery with few men in the cast because everybody is in the army at the time? This film answers that question.

Vacation From Marriage (1945)  MGM - A plain mousy couple is thrown from a rut by WWII, and are not sure they want to go back to that rut afterwards.

Strange Affair of Uncle Harry (1945) Republic - George Sanders plays a man whose family lost its fortune in the depression. He finds a bride in middle age, but his sister is determined to use every passive aggressive means at her disposal to stop the wedding. It's good to see Sanders play an (almost) normal person for a change.

One Way to Love  (1946)  Columbia - Misleading title. Plot is about a writing duo with a huge contract who need the third member of their team back because he is the one with the talent. He is engaged to a rich girl who thinks writing for radio is beneath him. Very funny vehicle for Chester Morris.

The Dark Mirror (1946)  Universal - One of two twins has probably murdered a man in what seems like the perfect crime.

It Had to Be You (1947) Columbia - Ginger Rogers was a little too old to be playing the runaway bride, but this one has a great fantasy angle that makes it worth it.

The Senator Was Indiscreet (1947) Universal - William Powell plays a crooked untalented blowhard who wants to be president. Sound familiar? Look for the great cameo at the end of the film.

Night Has a Thousand Eyes (1948) - Edward G. Robinson plays a psychic who can't do anything to change the premonitions that he has.

Mrs. Mike (1949) United Artists - Dick Powell is a Canadian Mountie  whose young bride is not prepared for the hardships of living in the arctic.

Alias Nick Beal (1949) Paramount - I can't help but think of Broadcast News and Albert Brooks' speech about the devil - "What do you think the devil's going to look like if he's around? ... Nobody is going to be taken in by a guy with a long, red, pointy tail!". Enter Ray Milland.

Dark City (1950) Paramount - Charlton Heston in a noir, if you can conceive of such a thing.

Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye (1950)  Independent - Sort of like White Heat in an alternate universe if Cody Jarrett had been sane.

September Affair (1950)  Paramount - An unhappily married man and a single woman meet in Italy, fall in love, miss a plane that crashes and are pronounced dead. This gives them the chance to start their lives over in Europe - during the production code era? Not a chance. Beautifully acted by Joseph Cotten and Joan Fontaine.

Mr. Denning Drives North (1951) British - A man kills his daughter's sleezy beau by accident, disposes of the body, then goes slowly insane when the body is never found.

The Whistle at Eaton Falls (1951) Columbia - It is not  easy to run a factory, not fire anybody, and compete, even in the days before big corporations ran everything.

Come Fill the Cup (1951) Warner Bros. - One of Cagney's best mature roles as a recovering alcoholic.

Five Fingers (1952) Fox - Spy cat and mouse film with a great ironic ending.

An Inspector Calls (1954) British - Actually it seems like either Rod Sterling or Alfred Hitchcock called in this suspense/thriller/fantasy with Alistair Sim as the titular inspector.

End of the Affair (1955) British - There is an amazing amount of human realism for the 1950s  in this film about marital infidelity.

Man in the Backseat (1960) British - When everything that could go wrong in what was supposed to be a simple theft does indeed go wrong.

Jigsaw (1962) British - Maybe Rudy Giuiliani was right. Maybe you do find the big crimes by going after the small ones.

The Slender Thread (1965) Paramount - A woman has taken an overdose and THEN calls the suicide hotline. Great acting by Sidney Poitier and Ann Bancroft.

J.T. (1969) - A Christmastime made for TV special about a poor kid bonding with a stray cat.

Wanda (1970) - Now on Criterion, so it could be argued that it is not that forgotten. About a woman who could not think less of herself unless you allowed her to use negative numbers.

The Last Child (1971) - Made for TV movie about a futuristic US where couples are limited to one child because of overpopulation.

Love Among the Ruins (1975) - Katharine Hepburn employs Lawrence Olivier as her lawyer in a  breach of promise suit and she seems to have no memory that the two were lovers decades before. The memory of her has caused him to stay single all of these years, so obviously he is annoyed.

Wise Blood (1979) - A man is a complete cynic about faith except when it comes to his broken down car. Very quirky.

Christmas Without Snow (1980) - Made for TV movie about a divorcee starting over in San Francisco.

One Dark Night (1982) - On DVD, but this teen horror flick is different.

The Paint Job (1992) - Completely lost as far as I can tell. A quirky little mystery/romantic triangle. There isn't even a Wikipedia article about it.

 

How many of these have appeared on TCM?  I know Wanda and Wise Blood have.

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I love the jazzy music to 4D Man. some say it doan work with the movie but I disagree. it accentuates well with scott nelson's degeneration from dedicated scientist to a chuck everything man of thrills.

 

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19 hours ago, skimpole said:

How many of these have appeared on TCM?  I know Wanda and Wise Blood have.

MovieCollectorOH is the ultimate authority, but these are the ones I'm pretty sure of having been on TCM at least once.

Love Parade (1929) Paramount - Such natural performances for an early talking picture you would think it was made on another planet. Being directed by Ernst Lubitsch probably helped.

Dynamite (1929) MGM - DeMille's first foray into sound was very interesting.

Blonde Crazy (1931) Warner Bros. - Yes, everybody has seen this one and TCM plays it frequently. But IMHO it is the best film for demonstrating the magic and chemistry in the duo of Cagney and Blondell. And Ray Milland's actions still make no sense to me.

By Whose Hand? (1932) Columbia - Ben Lyon is terrific in this fast moving precode as a reporter who gets on a train on an impulse to follow a pretty girl and runs into a big story. This was shown exactly once - Jan 11, 2007 - on TCM in a beautiful print. Where is it?

Blessed Event (1932) Warner Brothers - A signature role for fast talking Lee Tracy.

Turn Back the Clock (1933) MGM - Lee Tracy gets to live his life over on an alternate path and learns that his original life was not so bad after all.

Double Harness (1933) RKO - A perfectly good marriage is ruined by love. Better known since TCM got the rights problems straightened out.

Cross Fire (1933) RKO - The best B western ever. It shows a west in transition after WWI, and had a rather unique gangster angle built into. Oddly enough, TCM has shown it only three times, the last time being April 2011.

Dangerous Corner (1934) RKO - A theft and a suicide make everyone concerned believe one thing led to the other. Then a year later the truth comes out.

It All Came True (1940) Warner Brothers- Bogart would never have agreed to be in a film where he wears a hat AND pajamas just two years later. But here he hams it up and even laughs. A great musical comedy treat, but you'll never get me to believe that anyone would find Jeffrey Lynn to be the man of their dreams.

Flight From Destiny (1941) Warner Brothers- Thomas Mitchell in a rare leading role as a philosophy teacher who has a short time to live. What he chooses to do with that time is rather shocking.

Footsteps in the Dark (1941) Warner Brothers - Errol Flynn as a blue blood who has a secret life as an author of crime novels who winds up in a real life murder mystery.

Vacation From Marriage (1945)  MGM - A plain mousy couple is thrown from a rut by WWII, and are not sure they want to go back to that rut afterwards.

It Had to Be You (1947) Columbia - Ginger Rogers was a little too old to be playing the runaway bride, but this one has a great fantasy angle that makes it worth it.

Jigsaw (1962) British - Maybe Rudy Giuiliani was right. Maybe you do find the big crimes by going after the small ones.

The Slender Thread (1965) Paramount - A woman has taken an overdose and THEN calls the suicide hotline. Great acting by Sidney Poitier and Ann Bancroft.

Wanda (1970) - Now on Criterion, so it could be argued that it is not that forgotten. About a woman who could not think less of herself unless you allowed her to use negative numbers.

Wise Blood (1979) - A man is a complete cynic about faith except when it comes to his broken down car. Very quirky.

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48 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

 

It Had to Be You (1947) Columbia - Ginger Rogers was a little too old to be playing the runaway bride, but this one has a great fantasy angle that makes it worth it.

 

It hasn't been on TCM for a while, but I did catch it one time it was on. It's so deliciously chaming and bright and funny. I would love to see it again some day.

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